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Andrew50

'50 Dodge B-2 Series Stepside Truck Repairs

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26 minutes ago, ggdad1951 said:

I hear ya..the flywheel on my 4 wheeler would NOT come off, I eventually gave up and figured I'd take it in to the local shop where if they break it I won't pay for it.

 

Haven't had anything fixed in a shop lately, have you? They'll charge you for all of it. Been there, done that.

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3 hours ago, austinsailor said:

 

Haven't had anything fixed in a shop lately, have you? They'll charge you for all of it. Been there, done that.

 

well I did all I could to get it off...my fear is/was damaging the engine whacking on it too hard since it's on the crank.  They might actually have a trick or two, or at least parts when something breaks.

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On ‎6‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 11:33 PM, FlashBuddy said:

I used a five pound sledge hammer. I thought my puller was going to explode, then POP!

 

On ‎6‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 12:38 AM, P15-D24 said:

If you have one my favorite weapon of choice is a pneumatic air gun.  Between the torque and vibration from the gun action they come off in seconds. Otherwise a 5 pounder is a good choice. 

 

When I get back home I'll first try my largest impact wrench and then grab a bigger hammer.  I might move things to the driver's side to see if it might come loose a little easier.  I need a victory here. 

 

Reading the other discussions about the shoes:  This drum will turn with minimal drag.  It won't be hanging on the drums until/unless it first pops loose from the taper.  I am hoping to get the drums off without disturbing the setting of the shoes as I don't have the proper tools to reset them.  I do have dial indicators but not the mechanism to attach to the hub centerline and trace the outer diameter of the shoes.

 

I find the front shoes are pretty fresh and am hoping to find the same in the rear.

 

I dislike working in my little shop this time of the year with the heat and humidity.  For the next few months most of the work will be in the AM hours.

Edited by Andrew50

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A word of caution. If these are riveted shoes you can probably tell their shape. If bonded, I've found many that have set for years the lining will come loose from the metal. Rust between them, aging of the glue or whatever.

 

also, you might think of adding your state to your profile. If you are anywhere near you could borrow my brake adjusting tools. I have no idea where you are, though. Right now you'd have to wait till a guy in Kansas City is finished, though.

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I am in Greenwood, South Carolina. Centrally located on the western side of the state.

 

I'll take a hard look at the shoes for deterioration.  If the brake adjusting tools become available I don't mind paying shipping both ways.

 

Thank you,

Andrew

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☹️

Well this morning I connect my larger impact wrench (560 ft lb) backed by 130 PSI and the screw turns a couple turns and something pops and I am happy.   For a few moments.   Then I notice the arm of the puller broke and the drum didn't budge.  😨😖

I'll check with the folks I bought this from to see if replacement arms are available.

49AAD6BF-B211-4A89-A0F2-B8C26DF9D274.jpeg

Edited by Andrew50

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I wouldn't be asking about a replacement part.  Rather a refund so I could locate a better quality replacement tool

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Where are you located? Maybe their is a member near you that can assist with the correct tool. 

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4 hours ago, Dodgeb4ya said:

Looks like another Chinese tool failure.🙁

 

Indeed it is

 

4 hours ago, kencombs said:

I wouldn't be asking about a replacement part.  Rather a refund so I could locate a better quality replacement tool

 

After not hearing from them all day I have now sent a request for a return label.  It being Saturday they may not see my requests until Monday.

 

19 minutes ago, P15-D24 said:

Where are you located? Maybe their is a member near you that can assist with the correct tool. 

 

I am in small town Greenwood, SC.  An hour south of Greenville, SC.  An hour east of Athens, GA.  An hour and 15 minutes north of Augusta, GA.  We are really not near anywhere.  I would be willing to pay someone for their troubles if someone is nearby.  I do know of a guy in the area with a pair of the old Power Wagon trucks, but I don't know his name.  He occasional brings them to our local car shows.   If I can figure out how to contact him he might have a quality drum puller.

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The supplier is sending me at no charge two more arms for the drum puller.  My thinking is this....   It is Chinese made and hopefully I can get away with successfully using it this one time.  Also, I am going to do additional modification before using it again.  Earlier I wrote how I ground some clearance to allow the swing to the Dodge bolt circle.  But the result was contact of the arm at the disc at the tip of the finger.  This puts maximum pressure at the radius of the arm's end.

I am going to grind more to allow contact at the radius of the finger.  That should put full strength at the union.  I'll post a picture to show the current contact configuration.  If I still had access to a lathe I would reduce the diameter of the disc contact point by ~ 1/4".  But unfortunately I do not.  I hope you guys understand what I am saying.

 

I did make contact with the son of the local guy who owns the two old Dodge Powerwagons but I have received no response.  I'll leave that alone unless I see them out somewhere.  We tinkerers of old trucks should stick together, I think.      I wish I had a lathe.

73F2D551-E642-455C-BBED-C246D5C85818.jpeg

Edited by Andrew50

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Maybe using a hi-torque impact wrench on the screw is a little much...try using a 5# hammer on the wrench arm that comes with the kit.  This slow application of torque may allow you to see when hitting with a hammer stops turning the wrench.  That's the point where I would walk away for awhile before trying again.  Notice on the original style tools how much beefier the cast arms are in comparison to the asian version, especially on the original style that is the basis for the asian version.  The original style tools could take a pounding (literally) for years of service life; the asian versions of the original pullers, not so much as they are (unfortunately) disposable by design...also, apply some Marvel Mystery Oil at the hub and shaft interface, that may soak in while torque is being applied while you're off doing something else :cool:

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14 minutes ago, JBNeal said:

Maybe using a hi-torque impact wrench on the screw is a little much...try using a 5# hammer on the wrench arm that comes with the kit.  This slow application of torque may allow you to see when hitting with a hammer stops turning the wrench.  That's the point where I would walk away for awhile before trying again.  Notice on the original style tools how much beefier the cast arms are in comparison to the asian version, especially on the original style that is the basis for the asian version.  The original style tools could take a pounding (literally) for years of service life; the asian versions of the original pullers, not so much as they are (unfortunately) disposable by design...also, apply some Marvel Mystery Oil at the hub and shaft interface, that may soak in while torque is being applied while you're off doing something else :cool:

Excellent advice.  And I might add,  I'd run it up tight with the impact but not continue to hammer with it.  Switch to the hammer arm, set it tightly with a couple of good licks.  Then, using at least 3 lb hammer, smack the end of the screw.  alternate hitting the arm and screw with the hammer.  Works for me.

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I expect the replacement arms delivered Tuesday so I've turned my attention elsewhere. 

 

The new brake master & slave cylinders and lines are to deliver today.  I'll be reassembling the front brakes, running the lines and installing the master cylinder.  I understand the reasons to bench bleeding a master cylinder, but aren't these master cylinders kind of self bleeding with the holes between the piston and reservoir?  It seems any air in the piston area will bubble up into the reservoir after the piston is withdrawn.

What am I missing?

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1 hour ago, Andrew50 said:

I expect the replacement arms delivered Tuesday so I've turned my attention elsewhere. 

 

The new brake master & slave cylinders and lines are to deliver today.  I'll be reassembling the front brakes, running the lines and installing the master cylinder.  I understand the reasons to bench bleeding a master cylinder, but aren't these master cylinders kind of self bleeding with the holes between the piston and reservoir?  It seems any air in the piston area will bubble up into the reservoir after the piston is withdrawn.

What am I missing?

some will, some won't, don't risk it.  A lot depends on the angle of the cylinder.  If it's dead level, the surface tension of the fluid will keep the air from moving, it the hole location is higher it may work, if it's lower, not a chance.

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Thanks.  Does one use Teflon tape on the 3 tapered threads on the master cylinder?  I am wondering if eventually the brake fluid will eat through it. 

 

Edit:  I have a tube of Permatex Ultra Copper high temp silicone.  Might that work?

 

Edit2: I bought a tube of black Permatex and will use it.

 

Edit3:  Added picture of bench bleed 

DA5EA788-E8E3-4B9B-A031-8A487371504A.jpeg

Edited by Andrew50

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Well the replacement puller arms delivered today.  I ground clearance to allow radius support and applied pressure.  With some big hammer application, impact wrench and whacking the end of the puller shaft the drum popped loose.  I then turned my attention the other side and after applying the same it too popped loose.  ☺️

 

There is no noticeable ridge from shoe/drum wear but there is a lot of brake fluid contamination.  After being soaked in brake fluid for an extended period are the shoes toast?  Or can they be degreased and cleaned up?  I figured I might just replace them.

 

Is there anyone out there who will let me lease the tool to correctly set the shoes?

 

Now let's discuss the master cylinder. 😖 With the brake line attached as pictured above it is impossible to thread it through the framework and parts of the truck to install.   The steering box is in the way.   So I removed the bellow and clevis hardware and got it installed.  Then I couldn't get the bellow reinstalled on the back of the master cylinder.  Worked with it for more than an hour.  There is limited space and much grease and dirt on the underside of the truck.   So the master cylinder had to come back out for reinstall of the bellow.  In doing so I spilled most of the fluid, a lot of it on me and the remainder on the floor.  😞  Net result I lost my fluid and bench bleed.  So I emptied out the fluid, removed the brake line, reapplied the bellow and reinstalled the master cylinder.  Then screwed the clevis pin into the back and reinstalled the brake line.  I'll have to gently bleed the master cylinder after I get it all back together.

 

Whoever "restored" this truck did a great job on the sheet metal and interior but just painted black over everything underneath.  I can scrape 68 years of grease off surfaces and I often find surface rust under washers and other areas of the frame and suspension.  I wish I had the space, time and equipment to remove the body and completely restore the frame.

 

Edited by Andrew50

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Here are photos of two home - made brake shoe adjusting tools . I copied these photos from this forum a long time ago . Those shoes that are saturated need to be replaced or relined . 

IMG_5019.jpg

IMG_4066.jpg

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FWIW I used brake cleaner on my fluid soaked shoes, then boiled them for twenty minutes in my wife’s big spaghetti pot. Truck is stopping great. I read about the boiling technique somewhere on this forum.

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Jerry, good info, thank you.  I can make a variation of one of those.

 

Larry, thank you.  Since these have material remaining I'll do some more research and decide if these can be salvaged.

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FWIW I have seen bonded shoes delaminate and linings tear up hardware inside the drum...contaminated shoes of indeterminate age may be excellent candidates for replacement as new shoes would be cheap insurance against complete brake failure if that rear axle crossover line ruptures :cool:

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11 hours ago, FlashBuddy said:

FWIW I used brake cleaner on my fluid soaked shoes, then boiled them for twenty minutes in my wife’s big spaghetti pot. Truck is stopping great. I read about the boiling technique somewhere on this forum.

 

Yeah, but how's your spaghetti tasting these days?   "Don't worry honey, I wiped it out real good with lacquer thinner!"

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