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rwood64083

1949 - My First (vintage) Dodge Truck

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Picked up a new project last week.  Really, really excited about it.  I'm over 50 and have always had vintage cars, trucks, motorcycles and tractors.  Have an extensive background in mechanics.  Although, this truck has me a little stumped.  The the previous owner bought this 1949 but never got around to working on it or get it running.  He said it was a one ton truck.  From the research I've been doing it looks more like a 1.5 ton truck.  By the remnants of the door lettering this vehicle was once a Phillips 66 oil company truck out of Aurora Colorado.  At some point it ended up in Louisiana.  I can't seem to locate any info online regarding Dodge oil company or oil field trucks with exception to fuel trucks.  Not sure what this truck was used for or what type of bed was originally on it.  Appears a different bed was installed and homemade rear fender wells mounted.  You can see center of rear axle doesn't line up with center of bed/fender well area.  

 

Kind of have the feeling someone shortened the wheelbase.  Even is this is true I find the short wheel base large dual wheeled truck fascinating and very appealing.  I also think it had a two speed rear axle, but it doesn't look to have it anymore.  It still retains the flat head six cylinder coupled to a four speed transmission.  There is a pull knob, left of the steering wheel, for a PTO.  And the PTO cable routes under the cab ending near the right side of the transmission but is sitting in the right side of the frame.  The is nothing attached to the transmission.  Just the pto block off plate.

In front the the rear differential, on the left inside of frame, is a large vacuum diaphragm.  Not certain yet but appears to be a master cylinder attached to the vacuum diaphragm with brake lines going to it.  Think it was used to trailer pulling purposes?  

Enough of my talk for now.  Check out photos and please share feedback.
Thanks 

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1a.jpg

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Cool. It certainly looks like a 1.5 ton truck, shortened with a pickup body attached. The wheels probably didn't fit into the fenders so window wells were used to make larger ones.

Is the ID tag still on the drivers side A-pillar? The model ID would help identify what it was originally.

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For now it's just getting it up and running.  Find out what I have to work with.  Hoping the engine is in decent shape.  It's loose.  Know it will need brake lines.  One of them is leaking somewhere. 

 

Once all the operating things are lined out, the plan is to drive it.  Town is only 3+ miles away.  I see making a lot of trips to Home Depot in this thing.  

 

Maybe someday down the road a rebuild will happen.  

Rebuilt and restored a 1/2 ton Dodge for a customer about 7 or 8 years ago.  That was a ground up, frame off build.  Will see if I can find photos. 

Edited by rwood64083
Bad grammar.

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That's one beefy pick-up, very cool!  

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The only reason to cut a truck that short would be a space restriction.  I wonder if it was a trailer house mover or an airplane tug in its past.

 

Any evidence of a heavy duty tow bar on the rear somewhere?   A very cool truck by any measure except for the ride--I'm guessing it would be a little choppy.

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Looks to be a fun truck.  You'll certainly turn some heads.  If I get a chance next weekend,  I'll get a few pics of the 2 speed rear you requested.  I have 3 of them, a 47 a 49 and a 51.  If you were close to PA I'd make you a good deal on a rear.  Not that you would probably ever need it.   Your wheels look really nice.  I really like the short wheel base with that bed.   You'll have to run your engine numbers to see what you have.  I bought 2 trucks ( 1.5 toners) that had different engines transplanted.  Its always fun finding out that the 251 you just bought turns out to be a 265.  Have fun with it! 

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Checked out your profile picture Todd. That is a great looking truck. Have never seen a Dodge semi in that body style.  What does it have for an engine and transmission? 

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the brake cylinder & diaphragm behind the gas tank is a midland booster.  it was not for trailer applications, it is part of the original braking system.  with the booster, the brakes on your truck will work VERY well; no need for disc brakes up front.

 

IMG_0883.jpg

 

the original axle was an eaton 1350 2-speed, vacuum operated.  if you look closely, you can see the vacuum shift diaphragm on the rear differential.

 

P1120005.jpg

 

closeup of the numbers on the case of my 1350.

 

P3010004.jpg

Edited by wallytoo

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2 hours ago, rwood64083 said:

Checked out your profile picture Todd. That is a great looking truck. Have never seen a Dodge semi in that body style.  What does it have for an engine and transmission

Unfortunately it’s the original 251 that I had rebuilt. I always wanted to drop a monster motor in there. Your truck reminds me of “Stubby Bob”. It’s a furd truck but still cool. 

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16 hours ago, rwood64083 said:

For now it's just getting it up and running.  Find out what I have to work with.  Hoping the engine is in decent shape.  It's loose.  Know it will need brake lines.  One of them is leaking somewhere. 

 

Once all the operating things are lined out, the plan is to drive it.  Town is only 3+ miles away.  I see making a lot of trips to Home Depot in this thing.  

 

Maybe someday down the road a rebuild will happen.  

Rebuilt and restored a 1/2 ton Dodge for a customer about 7 or 8 years ago.  That was a ground up, frame off build.  Will see if I can find photos. 

 

cool.  Might I suggest using CuNi for your brake lines?  Super easy to use.  Bends like copper, strong as steel (and won't rust), but isn't as cheap.

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