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 Hey all,

 

New to the group here but I just picked up this 1941 dodge Kingsway and am looking for some more information on it. It runs and drives and has the original engine in it. I'm new to mopar vehicles but couldn't pass up the opportunity to have it. I've gone through the threads regarding brake drum removal but am looking for additional information on wiring diagrams and component names for under the hood. Appreciate any and all help.

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You have a Canadian  built car, twin to a Plymouth Road King.   The engine is a 3 3/8 bore 218 which is 25 inches along the cylinder head.

This is in comparison to the USA built engine which is 23 inches.  It is a smaller car than the US model.

You will find that the grille is smaller than the US model and the park and headlight are the same as Plymouth

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I just went through the absolute pain of removing the rear brake drums and assemblies this weekend. The previous owner opted for welding one of the rims to the hub and drum. Thank God I'm a machinist and have access to a lathe to knock the excess weld off the original hub. Are there any rear axle parts from these (brakes, drums, hub) that are the same as other years and models? How long was a tapered/keyed axle used? 

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drums would be the same 37 to 41....maybe 42  depends on the seal   ( National 5797 )

 

axles 37 t0 48 all DPCD 6 cyl

 

shoes  35 to 42 and light truck to 41 light truck front only to 54 (ten inch)     WC 17789 is a truck cylinder, not stepped which works well for me.

 

Tapered axles to 63.  not all the same taper though.

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Have never heard of someone welding the rim to the hub....a Jackass?............I think you are being too generous in your description of them............if you are going to perservere with the original rear axle and tapered hub etc then you need the biggest axle puller you can find.....this is one that I bought 45 yrs ago when I 1st got my 1940 Dodge and it hasn't met a rear hub/brake drum it didn't like..........nice car BTW........whats the white stuff on the ground ?........we don't see that here in Oz.........lol.......Welcome aboard the best Mopar forum........Andy Douglas.

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Hey, can you do me a favour on that 8.8? I have the same back end on my D20, albeit with drums not discs, but can you check the width? Mine was up on the ramp yesterday and this morning, and it looks like the back axle has shifted sideways slightly. I know the rear leaf springs are shot and most of the support comes from the optional 'heavy duty' coilovers, but it looks like one spring has slid sideways. On the front end, someone also made homemade shock mounts, but managed to make one taller than the other, and whoever put the SBC and TH350 in obviously thought bellhousings were for wimps...

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From my research the axles with drums are just a little bit shorter sitting somewhere around 59". The stock D20 rear end is 60" and the 8.8 with discs is 59.81"

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Edited by Damcow88

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Ok, thanks for that. So maybe the spring mounts are slightly further apart on the Ford axle...

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Ooof! 318 pages, it's the official Shop Manual. Ask me nicely, and I'm happy to scan and email/post specific pages, but to scan the whole thing would take a month of Sundays...

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This might help, too: http://www.pwchryslerclub.org/PlymouthManual_OCR.pdf

 

Edited by Wiggo

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