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Has anyone ever had to deal with a aggressive neighbor?

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38 minutes ago, lonejacklarry said:

 

Apparently, she never saw what injuries automobiles can inflict.  Must have been a small hospital.  Anyhow, I think you did the right thing--I wouldn't want a person like that around either.

 

You're right, it is a small hospital. I mentioned to her that my brother and two of his friends were killed in an automobile accident in '77 but she was unfazed... Realizing that prejudices, including my own; are irrational I let it go. 

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4 hours ago, lonejacklarry said:

 

Apparently, she never saw what injuries automobiles can inflict.  Must have been a small hospital.  Anyhow, I think you did the right thing--I wouldn't want a person like that around either.

I've rode motorcycles all my life. They are dangerous, so are cars. Going out in public can be dangerous. Home invasion robberies also make it dangerous to be at home.  How safe is anything?

 

Edited by Flatie46
Not sure, smart phone sometimes not so smart.

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7 hours ago, Flatie46 said:

( I've rode motorcycles all my life. They are dangerous, so are cars. Going out in public can be dangerous. Home invasion robberies also make it dangerous to be at home.  How safe is anything?

 

I've rode motorcycles since 1958 when I got my driver's license and I still ride today and I have several  motorcycles. It's not for everyone - my wife doesn't care for them. I realize my reaction time is not what it was back then, but I'm not about to quit as yet. One thing I did a few years ago, was to successfully complete a course endorsed by the MSF through the University of Northern Montana, (MSU - Northern ), to ensure my skill level was still up to par..:)

Edited by T120
added a word

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5 hours ago, Flatie46 said:

I've rode motorcycles all my life. They are dangerous, so are cars. Going out in public can be dangerous. Home invasion robberies also make it dangerous to be at home.  How safe is anything?

 

 

You will always find antidotal evidence of anything so if you go by that you'll end up believing whatever you want to believe however fallacious it is with regards to your actual odds of being injured or dying. Look at the odds (statistics) for injury or death for various ways to travel, etc. These change with time as demographics and technology change so look at as recent a set of statistics as you can. For example, violent crime rates in the US have, on average, been dropping for a couple of few decades now and on a per population basis we are about as safe now as we were in the 1950s and 1960s.

 

A quick web search indicates that in recent years on a per mile traveled basis you are about 35 times more likely to die on a motorcycle than in a car. And, on a per vehicle basis, a motorcycle is about 5 times more likely to be involved in a fatal accident than a car. Bus, train or airplane (including private airplane) are all safer ways to travel than either motorcycle or car. For motor vehicles there are currently about 43,000 deaths per year and about 2.9 million injuries in the US.

 

Regarding home invasion robberies, "on average, household members became victims of violent crimes in about 266,560 burglaries annually. Offenders known to their victims accounted for 65% of these burglaries; strangers accounted for 28%." See: https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/ascii/vdhb.txt Interesting that in nearly 2/3 of the instances, you would have needed to protect yourself from someone you know.

 

Anyway, comparing number motor vehicle injuries per year to home invasion victims per year, your odds are nearly 11:1 better at home than on the road. And if your family and friends are decent people (so you aren't part of that 65% who know their home invasion attackers), you are even safer at home.

 

You may decide not to follow your safest option for whatever reason. But you should make that decision consciously. For example, I like to drive, so I am more likely to drive than take the bus even if the bus is safer. And the new car with its radar based pre-collision braking system, its crumple zones, its side curtain air bags, etc is a lot safer than my 84 year old car with its "safety steel body". But I'll still drive the old cart because I really enjoy it. But I'm not going to claim it is a safe way to get around and I am going to be consciously concentrating on my defensive driving skills to help mitigate a bit of the odds of being injured or dying in an accident in it.

 

 

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1 hour ago, TodFitch said:

 

You will always find antidotal evidence of anything so if you go by that you'll end up believing whatever you want to believe however fallacious it is with regards to your actual odds of being injured or dying. Look at the odds (statistics) for injury or death for various ways to travel, etc. These change with time as demographics and technology change so look at as recent a set of statistics as you can. For example, violent crime rates in the US have, on average, been dropping for a couple of few decades now and on a per population basis we are about as safe now as we were in the 1950s and 1960s.

 

A quick web search indicates that in recent years on a per mile traveled basis you are about 35 times more likely to die on a motorcycle than in a car. And, on a per vehicle basis, a motorcycle is about 5 times more likely to be involved in a fatal accident than a car. Bus, train or airplane (including private airplane) are all safer ways to travel than either motorcycle or car. For motor vehicles there are currently about 43,000 deaths per year and about 2.9 million injuries in the US.

 

Regarding home invasion robberies, "on average, household members became victims of violent crimes in about 266,560 burglaries annually. Offenders known to their victims accounted for 65% of these burglaries; strangers accounted for 28%." See: https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/ascii/vdhb.txt Interesting that in nearly 2/3 of the instances, you would have needed to protect yourself from someone you know.

 

Anyway, comparing number motor vehicle injuries per year to home invasion victims per year, your odds are nearly 11:1 better at home than on the road. And if your family and friends are decent people (so you aren't part of that 65% who know their home invasion attackers), you are even safer at home.

 

You may decide not to follow your safest option for whatever reason. But you should make that decision consciously. For example, I like to drive, so I am more likely to drive than take the bus even if the bus is safer. And the new car with its radar based pre-collision braking system, its crumple zones, its side curtain air bags, etc is a lot safer than my 84 year old car with its "safety steel body". But I'll still drive the old cart because I really enjoy it. But I'm not going to claim it is a safe way to get around and I am going to be consciously concentrating on my defensive driving skills to help mitigate a bit of the odds of being injured or dying in an accident in it.

 

 

  I will agree on one point for sure,  better to make a conscious decision.

 

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1 hour ago, T120 said:

I've rode motorcycles since 1958 when I got my driver's license and I still ride today and I have several  motorcycles. It's not for everyone - my wife doesn't care for them. I realize my reaction time is not what it was back then, but I'm not about to quit as yet. One thing I did a few years ago, was to successfully complete a course endorsed by the MSF through the University of Northern Montana, (MSU - Northern ), to ensure my skill level was still up to par..:)

I've said for years I would like to take a MSF course. My wife took one when she got her  motorcycle license but I missed out.  I hope to maybe take one with my son.

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Had a good friend survive 3 motorbike accidents....2 of them serious....but one day at work he tried tipping a dr pepper machine for some free drinks. He had done this on numerous occasions without incident.....he couldn't keep his footing slipped and the machine fully loaded at 800 lbs crushed him.

So you never know when or how........

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1 hour ago, Frank Elder said:

Had a good friend survive 3 motorbike accidents....2 of them serious....but one day at work he tried tipping a dr pepper machine for some free drinks. He had done this on numerous occasions without incident.....he couldn't keep his footing slipped and the machine fully loaded at 800 lbs crushed him.

So you never know when or how........

but but...those were SOFT drinks....

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21 hours ago, MackTheFinger said:

 

Had a new neighbor move in next to my primary residence 12-15 years ago. He and his OL were talking to me right after they moved in, the guy said his wife wouldn't let him have a Harley and I immediately repeated what I've always heard, "What you need is a new OL." She pipes up "I'm a trauma nurse, I know what motorcycles can do." Next day the surveyors were out and the privacy fence was up within a week.. Old double bubble didn't hang around long and that neighbor was gone in less than a year.. Me and the fence are still here..

 

The horses are at my other place and I really don't mind them.. Sometimes I'm not fond of the flies.. One of them, the horses, not the flies; has me and my wife trained. We always have an apple for her.. :D

 

I sincerely hope things work out with your neighbor.. He sounds like someone I wouldn't like and I can get along with practically anyone..

 

I am easy going to, this whole thing is complete BS.

 

We are filing a Cease and Desist letter, the lawyer and our family trust are reviewing the details.  Step one has begun...

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16 hours ago, Flatie46 said:

I've rode motorcycles all my life. They are dangerous, so are cars. Going out in public can be dangerous. Home invasion robberies also make it dangerous to be at home.  How safe is anything?

 

Great point!  LOL

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14 hours ago, Plymouthy Adams said:

forget the cars and cycles...horses can do a number on folks also.........

My horseback riding injuries far exceeded injuries sustained on my bike.  I went down 17 years ago, and bounced off the CA 94 freeway at 75 MPH.  The worst part of it all was the motorcycle bounced off of me, that saved the left side of it from damage.  Because I am big on wearing leather protection, my injuries were a sprained shoulder and some bruises and minor road rash....  I still own that same Harley Davidson today.  The horses kick, bite, and aim you towards large bodies of water and tree limbs during training.  I broke my wrist once, and have sustained some aweful abrasions while training.  One of my student horses encountered a rattle snake, being startled and fearing of being bit, I got a full on rodeo experience and lost my grip.  I landed on my right palm, which bent my hand up against my forearm.  Cracked 4 bones in my wrist.  I finished the training that day, and I am against spurs btw, I still have the horse it's reward(sweet feed) before driving to the hospital.

 

Being a mechanic can do a number on you too!  LOL

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10 hours ago, TodFitch said:

 

You will always find antidotal evidence of anything so if you go by that you'll end up believing whatever you want to believe however fallacious it is with regards to your actual odds of being injured or dying. Look at the odds (statistics) for injury or death for various ways to travel, etc. These change with time as demographics and technology change so look at as recent a set of statistics as you can. For example, violent crime rates in the US have, on average, been dropping for a couple of few decades now and on a per population basis we are about as safe now as we were in the 1950s and 1960s.

 

A quick web search indicates that in recent years on a per mile traveled basis you are about 35 times more likely to die on a motorcycle than in a car. And, on a per vehicle basis, a motorcycle is about 5 times more likely to be involved in a fatal accident than a car. Bus, train or airplane (including private airplane) are all safer ways to travel than either motorcycle or car. For motor vehicles there are currently about 43,000 deaths per year and about 2.9 million injuries in the US.

 

Regarding home invasion robberies, "on average, household members became victims of violent crimes in about 266,560 burglaries annually. Offenders known to their victims accounted for 65% of these burglaries; strangers accounted for 28%." See: https://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/ascii/vdhb.txt Interesting that in nearly 2/3 of the instances, you would have needed to protect yourself from someone you know.

 

Anyway, comparing number motor vehicle injuries per year to home invasion victims per year, your odds are nearly 11:1 better at home than on the road. And if your family and friends are decent people (so you aren't part of that 65% who know their home invasion attackers), you are even safer at home.

 

You may decide not to follow your safest option for whatever reason. But you should make that decision consciously. For example, I like to drive, so I am more likely to drive than take the bus even if the bus is safer. And the new car with its radar based pre-collision braking system, its crumple zones, its side curtain air bags, etc is a lot safer than my 84 year old car with its "safety steel body". But I'll still drive the old cart because I really enjoy it. But I'm not going to claim it is a safe way to get around and I am going to be consciously concentrating on my defensive driving skills to help mitigate a bit of the odds of being injured or dying in an accident in it.

 

 

One thing I learned in life is Fun=Risk taking....  If I die riding my bike, or driving my 1930's Mopar, then I will die happy. 

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11 hours ago, T120 said:

I've rode motorcycles since 1958 when I got my driver's license and I still ride today and I have several  motorcycles. It's not for everyone - my wife doesn't care for them. I realize my reaction time is not what it was back then, but I'm not about to quit as yet. One thing I did a few years ago, was to successfully complete a course endorsed by the MSF through the University of Northern Montana, (MSU - Northern ), to ensure my skill level was still up to par..:)

One of my riding buddies just retired his Harley Davidson.  He bought a convertible T-Bird to take it's place.  His knees are failing and he could no longer pick up his bike.  The down side of making it into your 80's...  

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2 hours ago, Frank Elder said:

Had a good friend survive 3 motorbike accidents....2 of them serious....but one day at work he tried tipping a dr pepper machine for some free drinks. He had done this on numerous occasions without incident.....he couldn't keep his footing slipped and the machine fully loaded at 800 lbs crushed him.

So you never know when or how........

Karma laid a hand in in that one...  Crime doesn't pay!  Youza!

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43 minutes ago, classiccarjack said:

One thing I learned in life is Fun=Risk taking....  If I die riding my bike, or driving my 1930's Mopar, then I will die happy. 

 

so true, I have about 2800 jumps, only 2 reserve rides and one broken leg (all 3 incidents totally preventable, but young, dumb and full of...)

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Best thing I did with my not so neighborly neighbor was to have my property surveyed and found the actual property lines. Gained 4 trees (that he had planted on "his" property) and he was pissed!

Edited by iowa51

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Good fences make good neighbours.

Just bought a house, very first thing that will happen is a 6 foot privacy fence around the back. 3' around the front.

 

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We sold our next-door lot when the kids went off to college.  The first occupants of the new house on the lot were extremely quiet and private, behind their new 6-foot high fence.  One Christmas the husband was over to our house, for a rare visit, and was shocked to see that our kitchen window overlooked his back deck.  A trellis went up in a hurry.  The second family was more normal,  but we have had little interaction with them.  (We seem to be at opposite ends of the political spectrum, but the matter doesn't come up.)

 

On the other side of our house, I erected a 3-foot fence,  just to delineate the property line, to know how far to mow the lawn.   We got along well with the widow there, and later her daughter and family.  Next came a young couple, who have been gifted with three daughters.  When the first daughter was two, she wandered through a gap between the fence and our house, which fostered considerable famliarity between us neighbors.  The gap has since been called the Serena Pass.  We get along great with the family, to the point of collecting each others' mail and having a key to each others' house.  We are unofficial family. 

 

The height of the fence has an effect on neighborliness.  So build your fence accordingly.     

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12 minutes ago, DonaldSmith said:

We get along great with the family, to the point of collecting each others' mail and having a key to each others' house.  We are unofficial family. 

 

The height of the fence has an effect on neighborliness.  So build your fence accordingly.  

 

I sure hope we are that lucky, I am always friendly and try to be helpful where I can.

Honestly people are just not the way I remember them.

My uncles new neighbour is a real peach. My uncle owns 2 acres since 1960 and he knows his property lines.

New neighbour moves in and right away tries grabbing 20'x300' because of some google map he downloaded. The guy comes over and stands in your face, tells you you need to move your **** now or he is going to kick your ass.

He drives his tractor onto your property and threatens to drag your **** away, he uses his tractor and removes ground cover from your property ....

I cant tell you how many times the police were called and reports filed.

Finally uncle spent $1200 and had the property surveyed, the lines were exactly where he said they were, neighbour started pulling out the survey stakes, we called the police again.

Then when my cousin and her grandson was out looking in a storage shed at 10:00 at night, 500' away from the neighbours, he comes out and starts calling her a crack hoe and every name in the book in front of the kid, because his dogs would not stop barking.

 

I hope I have good luck with my new neighbours, but I lack  real trust in human nature today, way kids have been raised with no supervision. They feel they can scream and cry and get their way .... not for me.

I want a tall fence!

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2 hours ago, DonaldSmith said:

We sold our next-door lot when the kids went off to college.  The first occupants of the new house on the lot were extremely quiet and private, behind their new 6-foot high fence.  One Christmas the husband was over to our house, for a rare visit, and was shocked to see that our kitchen window overlooked his back deck.  A trellis went up in a hurry.  The second family was more normal,  but we have had little interaction with them.  (We seem to be at opposite ends of the political spectrum, but the matter doesn't come up.)

 

On the other side of our house, I erected a 3-foot fence,  just to delineate the property line, to know how far to mow the lawn.   We got along well with the widow there, and later her daughter and family.  Next came a young couple, who have been gifted with three daughters.  When the first daughter was two, she wandered through a gap between the fence and our house, which fostered considerable famliarity between us neighbors.  The gap has since been called the Serena Pass.  We get along great with the family, to the point of collecting each others' mail and having a key to each others' house.  We are unofficial family. 

 

The height of the fence has an effect on neighborliness.  So build your fence accordingly.     

This is the first time that I have ever had an issue.  I normally get along with everyone I meet.  But it is what it is....

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9 hours ago, classiccarjack said:

One of my riding buddies just retired his Harley Davidson.  He bought a convertible T-Bird to take it's place.  His knees are failing and he could no longer pick up his bike.  The down side of making it into your 80's...  

The time will come for me when I have to give up riding a heavy bike and I've given it some thought. I spoke with someone the other day in the same circumstances. He is not ready yet to give up riding altogether but is considering buying a lighter bike for the same reason.

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