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Brent B3B

Valves, springs and guides... (oh my)

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Briggs & Stratton and Tecumseh need the valve tipped for setting the valves. Oh and maybe Clinton garden engines.

Not a MoPar flathead Brent! :eek:    :D  

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On ‎7‎/‎30‎/‎2017 at 1:51 PM, Brent B3B said:

I removed and cleaned up the adjuster screws with very little improvement. considering grinding the valve stems to gain the difference

 

Do you mean they're bottomed out in the lifters / no improvement in adjustment?

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6 hours ago, John-T-53 said:

Do you mean they're bottomed out in the lifters / no improvement in adjustment?

I am not proud of it,  i'll delete the video soon but this is what I am looking at.

my other trucks don't have this problem............

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Yup, you gotta grind the end of the valve stems, which is part of the normal to-do list of a valve job. Grind them 2-3x more than you need for clearance as you'll have plenty of adjustment in the "up" direction. I assume that you have the #6 exhaust lifter bottomed out?

Must take them to the shop for this. they have to be ground on a valve grinder that makes the right kind of finish, exactly perpendicular to the stem. It's a 10-minute task for all 12 valves. At least you don't have the springs back in yet!

When you get them back, install the springs then check the clearance. Don't forget you have to re-adjust when hot. Also, the clearance will sometimes decrease over time as the valves seat, so check them after about 1k miles. On mine, there was no change.

 

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When I rebuilt my engine I installed Chevy valves and new valve springs. I did not have to grind my valve bottoms as I had ample adjustment room. Per my cam grinders instructions I adjusted all my valves cold and I have not had to readjust them. I also used a dial indicator to confirm the valve lift was exactly what the cam grinder said it was and to make sure I had ample clearance so the valves would not hit the head.

MVC-026F-1.jpg

Springs-1.jpg

Valvelift-1-1.jpg

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Do you have the part number or application for the Chevy valve that you used? Are the springs Chevy as well? (I've heard that some people have used Chevy valve springs in this application).

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13 minutes ago, HotRodTractor said:

Do you have the part number or application for the Chevy valve that you used? Are the springs Chevy as well? (I've heard that some people have used Chevy valve springs in this application).

I do not have a part number for the valves. The springs are Mopar.

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I used Chevy valves (made by SBI)  too only because I couldn't find a stock Mopar valve and guide combo that would give the proper stem to guide clearance (all were excessive).

Found some SBI valves that had a thicker stem, then honed out the guides. The valve faces had to be turned way down on the lathe to make 'em fit, it was a biotch.

I would do it differently now, keep the stock valves and install bronze guide inserts like Marty had in his hopped up flattie.

IMG_7563.JPG

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Edited by John-T-53

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What was the trouble getting factory Mopar or replacement old stock parts  (valves and guides) that had correct stem to guide clearance?

Modern day replacement parts I'm sure would not be good.

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Ordered through machine shop, they don't deal with nos parts, no suppliers carry them usually. Where would one find nos valves or guides? VPW?

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Hi, I am working on a 235, and trying to get guides out.  I have used an air chisel like Brent did in his video but have not been able to free one yet.  One question is,  should it require heating the block and cooling the guide possibly??  I used an infrared light which did bring the chamber area up significantly, I then put an ice cube on guide and let it melt, then pushed away to no avail.  I noticed in the manual which was provided to this thread they use a hammer and pilot type tool.  I'm concerned, and don't want to break or wreck anything.  I did machine down a blunt tool from my air chisel for a good fit.  My plan was to build up the o.d. of the chisel bit to totally cover the o.d. of top of guide if I was able to budge them loose to avoid breaking top off of guide.  I was also thinking of using an air saw to cut the guide down the side being it appears to be of cast thinking it would cut rather easy to relieve the guide for easier removal.  

Anyone willing to mentor, I am all yours..

Thank you,

Doug

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Dang it!, sorry your having such troubles Doug.

when you say you can't "free one yet" do you mean any of them or just one of them?

I had a bare with the number one and number four exhaust valve guides. I got frustrated but I figured I was at the point of no return and beat them down with a BFH (big flippin' hammer :))

because my old guides were at the correct height from the face of the block, (7/8") i did one at a time. drove the old one out and used a straight edge on the underside, against the others, installed the new one and repeated.

i like the idea of the saw to score the guides to relieve the pressure (thought about it myself on the number 1 and 4)  but, it would be a bad deal if the cut went too deep or slipped......

i know i am not much help.....

 

      

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So no heat!?  I was worried about using a bfh... Think I will keep the heating and cooling going and give the bfh some consideration... Thanks Brent, your input is helpful.  I'm so excited to get these huggers out I can hardly stand it, bUT trying to be cautious...

 

 

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You have to drive them out from the top with a pilot drift and a BFH. The pilot must be slightly smaller in diameter than the guide so you don't mushroom the end of the guide, and so you can drive it through the bore. You can make a pilot quite easily if you have a lathe. A good piece of stock to start with is a differential cross shaft, or a king pin.

Pound away, you can't really hurt anything as long as the pilot doesn't slip and you don't hit anything else. It takes quite a few blows, you'll only moving the guide about .030" - .050" at the most with each blow.

You can break the guides in half when they've been driven half way through with a cold chisel and your trusty BFH, or a reciprocating type "saw thing" like Brent used. Only need to do this if the lifters are in place. Good luck!!!

 

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