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kope49

Which Diamondback tire?

45 posts in this topic

There are numerous threads on wide whitewalls and classic tires on here. My question is more specific directed at others who bought Diamondbacks.  I am likely going with 215-75-15 tires for my 50 Wayfarer but am not sure which makes more sense the Diamondback II or the AS4.  I see one is made by Hancock the other by Toyo but those of you that have bought what brand did you choose and why? I suppose Randy can give me the merits of both but maybe someone who is running one or the other can tell me how satisfied they are with their choice. $1100 for tires is a lot of money to some of us. :)

 

In other news my rebuilt 230 is being dropped into the car this week. It will be nice this year to be able to go touring without feeling I was working for the mosquito control district.

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my first car was a 1950 dodge meadowbrook, a hand me down in the family. $19.95 earl schieb paint job. I still love the fake woodgrain dash and the square gauges.huge backseat that was a bonus at the drive-in.the wide whites will look great, but they are overpriced in my opinion. however,there are only a few companies that sell them, so you have to pay to play.my car would have to be restored to justify the expense, so I went with a standard whitewall, about $400.i wish I had the wide whites. good luck with your choice. capt den

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I'm in the same situation. I have BF Goodrich Silver Town bias from Coker on my '52 wayfarer. I want to put radials from Diamond Back on mine, but I am holding off as long as I can to see what people have to say about the Auburn Deluxe they are supposed to have soon. From pictures it looks like bias, but is a true radial. No reviews yet that I can find. If not the Auburn I will probably go with the AS4 just for lower price. Mine will probably dry rot before wearing out from use. I think Hankook and Toyo both have decent reputations.

Bob

PS You can see a picture of the Auburn on page 22 of the on line catalog.

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I haven't used the diamond backs, but I've used Toyos and hancooks on my modern cars - I'd go with the Toyo's.. had them on a 1983 BMW 528 and could push it hard around a race track. The Hancooks on another car went lumpy.

 

Rick

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DK,

If I were you I'd loose my fixation of the fattest Diamond white wall thing and go to Coker Tire. Their Firestone 6.70x15 Bias Ply is a 3 1/4" wide white and sells for $188. That's four tires for under $800. I have used Coker tires on every one of the 12 restorations I have done with no problems. There are no bumps at 75 mph either and I have received my share of trophies with them on these cars.

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For some reason I can't get the pics to post

Edited by bob westphal

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DK,

If I were you I'd loose my fixation of the fattest Diamond white wall thing and go to Coker Tire. Their Firestone 6.70x15 Bias Ply is a 3 1/4" wide white and sells for $188. That's four tires for under $800. I have used Coker tires on every one of the 12 restorations I have done with no problems. There are no bumps at 75 mph either and I have received my share of trophies with them on these cars.

Bob I had a 53 DeSoto that I put the Coker bias ply tires on and while they were better than what I took off I have gotten spoiled with years of radials and like the way they track and handle corners better than bias ply.  I hear the other people on here who think the price of these wide whites is ridiculous unless you have money to burn or a show car.  I have neither but managed to stash away enough money from a part time job to pay for re-chroming my back bumper(badly needed) and new tires.  I guess the silliest part of it is these cars didn't have whites at all when they were new.  My Wayfarer sedan was the cheapest Dodge you could buy in 1950 and I'm not even sure you could order whites.  I just like the look.

 

The person i bought my car from put 235-70-15 narrow whitewall tires on it and they are so wide the rear fenders rub around corners. They have a lot of tread but I don't like the 70 profile or extra wide tires on my stock car.

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I currently have 6.70 x 15 ww bias plys on my 47 P15....from Coker. I think they are Firestones (havent looked at them for a while). They have been a good set of tires. I ran some used radials for a while a few years ago...and indeed they handled better. Actually compensated for some play in the steering. Would like to replace the current bias with radials next time...just hate to pay those high prices. So we shall see. The worst thing I found with radials was--harder to turn when stopped or going very slow....like parking.

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Coker carries wide white radials starting at around $200.

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I just received my Hagerty Magazine in the mail last week (Spring 2014 Issue)

In the Q&A (Question and Answer page 62) a guy asks about "shelf Life" of Tires.

The Answer was: "tires are rubber based, and rubber deteriorates" it goes on to say "experts consulted suggest 

Tires should be replaced every 5-7 years, and that goes for Classics as well as modern Tires".

I think the experts are either rich or getting kick back for their opinion, because I have driven on Tires that have

been 10 years old and older with no problems, for decades. The Answer does wind up saying "Tires are sold (After 2000)

with a 4-Digit code on them". "For Instance, a Tire coded 3303 was manufactured during the 33rd week of 2003".

So I at least learned something from reading the magazine - not the throw out your tires every 5-7 years thing,

but the coded part - L.O.L. Who's got a Grand for New Tires every 5 years? Maybe Jay Leno.

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. . .  L.O.L. Who's got a Grand for New Tires every 5 years? Maybe Jay Leno.

I'm finding the bias ply tires available for my narrow 17" rims only seem to last for 10K to 15K miles which works out to 5 to 7 years with the number of miles I drive per year. Must be a conspiracy by the manufacturers to have them wear out at the same time as the rubber officially ages too much. :)

 

I will be considering radials (there is now one brand available in the size needed) next time.

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I don't think the age thing applies to bias, but it's pretty well proven that radials can fly apart after about 6 years. We've had a number of them fail in our family, causing considerable damage.

For my trailers that don't get used much I get bias ply tires. The 2 that I haul often input radials on.

Radials really are a problem once they pass that 6 year mark.

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I don't think the age thing applies to bias, but it's pretty well proven that radials can fly apart after about 6 years. We've had a number of them fail in our family, causing considerable damage.

For my trailers that don't get used much I get bias ply tires. The 2 that I haul often input radials on.

Radials really are a problem once they pass that 6 year mark.

I can just see myself in 6 years with new looking radials on my car with about 8,000 miles and little noticeable wear telling my wife I need to invest another $1100 (maybe $1400 by then) to replace them.  I'll just have to take my chances on tread separation... :D

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I think I'm going back to Coker for bias ties in a few years.

Mine will be 10 years old by then. I won't mind replacing them by then.

I will go for the Firestone Wide Whites Look. It just seems right to put them

on my 48 Chrysler Royal

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I'm in the same situation. I have BF Goodrich Silver Town bias from Coker on my '52 wayfarer. I want to put radials from Diamond Back on mine, but I am holding off as long as I can to see what people have to say about the Auburn Deluxe they are supposed to have soon. From pictures it looks like bias, but is a true radial. No reviews yet that I can find. If not the Auburn I will probably go with the AS4 just for lower price. Mine will probably dry rot before wearing out from use. I think Hankook and Toyo both have decent reputations.

Bob

PS You can see a picture of the Auburn on page 22 of the on line catalog.

 

I was interested in the Auburn Deluxe tires about 6+ months ago, but after 2 unanswered emails to Diamondback, I gave up. I know I could've called, but you guys on the east coast close too early & not really convenient to call from work. Not here to slam Diamondback, I'm sure they make a great product, just didn't like their customer service...or lack there of. I ended up going with the Firestone Champion Deluxe bias ply wide whites (6.00 x 16) & very happy with them. I personally don't like the look of radials on these old cars. My .02 & doesn't really answer the OP's question.

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I went with the AS4 in the second widest side wall. My 49' came to me with WW 770 cokers that were slightly over sized. I decided on the 205/75/15.

For my spare I already went to a black wall hahaha they better all wear out together or I'll be flipping some WW over because 1 grand for WW tires is abit much. 

Plus the black walls will look good on a Maron car with 1 1/2" beauty rings! I like Diamondbacks staff they were straight forward and their service as to shipping was excellant. Plus the Hankook Tires have been a good buy at decent prices for some time. Their opening a U.S.A. plant this year. If your going any distances I think radials are needed, the roads where I am in Florida are grooved out for the most part so bias is an adventure!  

Doc.

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I know that you specifically asked about Diamondback tyres so disregard my 2 cents worth if you wish.........when I was looking for tyres/tires(lol) for my 41 Plymouth I contacted the importers of both Diamondback and Coker tyres here in Oz, pricewise they were almost identical in price but the Diamondbacks in the size I wanted were not available...........I wanted and purchased 195/75x15 and 235/75x15 Coker Classic Wide Whitewall Radials and was very pleased with the difference they made to the steering, handling and general "feel" of the car...........admittedly they replaced Columbia(?) brand 6.00 x 16 crossplies that I think were probably past their use by date although they looked still fine with plenty of tread left...........I'm a hotrodder so it was decided to replace them.....lol............I would assume that Diamondback tyres would offer a similar improvement............regards, andyd    

post-612-0-84754800-1392449061_thumb.jpg

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Are you guys putting tubeless tires on your original tube-type rims? 

 

 

The original rims of 1948 D24 are good for tubeless, they have the safety rim feature - You may even check it and read it on the owners manual.

When I replaced the dry rotted bias ply tires by tubeless radials on my D24, I merely sanded and painted the rims. Tubeless type valve seat fits tight on the original hole on the rim.

No any problems ever since.

 

Besides, in case you really want to gamble your safety, put inner tubes inside tubeless type radials. I have experienced flat on 55mph with that kind of setup (assembled by previous owner),

Definetely never will allow that set on any of my cars ever.

Inner surface of the tubeless tire slowly rubs the tube resulting large hole blow of the tube. Air escapes in fraction of second because blown tube leaves valve hole of the rim open.

This is exactly the reason why tubeless are superior in safety, they leak slow, giving driver time to stop safely. Tubes blow.

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you should really have a safety rim design..you should have a slightly wider rim also for modern radials..again SHOULD.....your rim's very integrity is the limiting factor....and I have seen older rims fail as much with bias ply as radial...construction of some rims were riveted halves..others welded...some folks will blast and paint the older rims well with a POR 15 providing increased protection against leakage..some rims have oval holes for the valve stem..you can buy these ovals stems for install and use with tubeless tires.  There is always a certain risk using the older rims, bias or radial tires but most tire retailers will for liability reasons tell you not to do it.  Or you can move up to some more modern rim and still have your hub cap clips so to run stock caps and retain original looks.  (thinking 53/54 year) Again..still not quite the radial era.  I can also attest that 1988 5th Ave/Diplomat rims will not look that out of place on your car if you have a full dish covers, I used the wire baskets from the 5th ave for a great look but alas for a purist this is not stock....hubcaps are usually your sole concern on newer rims...with some attention to front tie rod clearance where on the application of the newer rim to the 49 Plymouth, the front required a 1/4 spacer to allow proper clearance between the tire and the tie rod end.  All this is yours to digest and make the best call for you own application/wants..

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I personally did not want to run the risk of using 60 year old rims. So I bought new rims manufactured by Wheelvintiques and purchased through Summit Racing. Here is a link to there webpage.

 

http://www.wheelvintiques.com/

 

I like chrome wheels so that is what I bought. But they have many choices. I bought my rims about 12 years ago and at the time they were around a hundred bucks each.

 

gold3.jpg

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Great posts from the veterans, I forgot to mention that my car came with Coker bias AND cocker rims that were built in 2007! Good tires need good rims no doubt!

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