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pflaming

1954 Plymouth Suburban Project

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I presented Rusty Hopes list of require parts to three parts stores today. All three at $340 +\-.  One offered a cash discount at $280 which I took. It still pays to shop around.

now I have a question. My truck spindle had a bolt that centered and locked the king pin in place. This '53 Plymouth apparently has a driven in pin. I spect it will require a good punch and a heavy hammer to drive it out. Maybe an  opposing "anvil" as well. Is this how it comes out? 

Edit:

After some more research, that is a pressed in pin. The non-head end will have a deep chisel mark which spreads that part of the pin and secures it. Use a dremmel tool and grind away that swelled edge and the pin the drives out. 

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Edited by pflaming

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On 11/21/2017 at 9:56 PM, pflaming said:

I have this '89 Wrangler dual cylinder mounted in my suburban. Lines are now installed and tonight I lengthened the push rod so it now reaches the wrangler MC.  Question: does that MC need to be bled before it will move fluid? 

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do the reservoir(s )stick up thru the floor?

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i could not get that pin to move so I'm drilling it out!  The drill bit is all the way through, diiner call stopped the task for tonight.  I hope I can drive the other pin. I drilled out where the chisel mark is but no go. 

 

Edited by pflaming

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One spindle is removed. That pin was really tight. All looks good though, now to drill out the holes and tap for the new bolts. 

 

Edited by pflaming

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On ‎2017‎-‎11‎-‎30 at 10:09 AM, pflaming said:

i could not get that pin to move so I'm drilling it out!  The drill bit is all the way through, diiner call stopped the task for tonight.  I hope I can drive the other pin. I drilled out where the chisel mark is but no go. 

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You do realize, I assume, that those pins are tapered and only come out in one direction. Never heard of one being drilled out before but they can be bu**ers!

Edited by RobertKB

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The pin shown came out,  for the other side I bought a quality short punch and started to drive it with a 30 oz small sledge, it moved an 1/8 of an inch and went solid. I even heated it yellow hot and it still won't move any further. So, will have to drill it out as well. Little stubborn items like this eat up lots of time and energy. 

Update: I just added up the hard numbers to install disc brakes up front and put new shoes and cylinder kits in the rear, replacement master cylinder and new lines. Currently I have nearly $700 invested. Labor is NOT included.  It does add up. Fortunately for me I just sold $1,000 in parts and have been building this Suburban from used  parts  sales from the other two suburbans I had. Patience on  partsneeded can save a ton of $$$.  

Edited by pflaming

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Paul they also go opposite directions. So if you are hammering the second one from the same side as the first you're going the wrong way!

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TKS  for the tip, I knew that, the pin moved then no go. Got to rest the new knee today, overworked it yesterday. But I'll get it out. 

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The problem with driving out the pin is its location. There is little sledge head swing room. I now have the second pin drilled out. Seems the best way for me. I would guess those pins were pressed in at the factory. 

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Here are the  parts required with Rusty Hopes' kit. The spindle and  steering arm are from the vehicle. Now I have work to do. For me, this is the only way to go. Now, no brake adjusting, so fade on wet roads or long down grades and straight stopping every time. I have a similar set on my truck, obviously I am very pleased with the results.

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Edited by pflaming

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Drilling out to size and tapping the new holes is where the rebuild starts. I marked the spindles so they return to their original axle. My drill press is not large enough for this task.  Remember, if the king pins are not good, fix them. 

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Drilled and tapped the required holes and finally starting to reassemble. This is the enjoyable part, disassembly can be tough as I discovered with those pins. I had to drill them both out.

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The Emperor is getting some new shoes. Now to connect the brake lines and button up some other items and I can bleed the front pair. I have the rear lines capped off, will order shoes and cylinder kits tomorrow. 

About an hour ago I removed the shoes and cylinder from the rear brakes. The shoes have ample remaining lining and the cylinder only needs to be shined and a new kit installed. Some afternoons are better than others.

So. . . Now I have a pair of front brake drums. 

 

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Edited by pflaming

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They now are ready to torque. I slipped a rim and tire on momentarily and all fit and clear.  Bearings may be pre packed, yet I always press as much grease into them as I can.  These are Dodge rotors, they weigh 30# each and are really quite massive for my little suburban.

 

 

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Edited by pflaming

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Never Torqued front tapered wheel bearings, only live axle rears? Did new parts  come with some torque specs?  :confused:

Just asking about new stuff?

DJ

Edited by DJ194950

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With a fresh cup of coffee in front of me, I'm studying how to replace those rear seals. I know I must remove the axle, bummer. Good news is that the cylinders are clean and smooth, even the inside seals are good, and so are the shoes and drums. The PO must have repaired all just before the car was parked. The passenger side is the same, so I'm not going to touch that side. Will have pictures later today. 

 

Edited by pflaming

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Neil,  NO need to pull the axle on my '53 in order to replace the outer seal. Just remove the backing plate and drive the seal out of the backing plate and press in a new seal. The outer bearing is fully exposed but I haven't figured out how to remove it. It  may come off with the axle. I'm confident my bearing is OK so I will repack it and leave it at rest.

        I raised the rear up high with a winch from above then set back down on substantial stands and that really helps under car work, but when I see that unclean frame, an exhaust to install, brake and fuel lines that need to be secured, etc., I may still lift the body off the frame and clean it all and secure as required. 

       If I do that, what major item(s) should I keep in mind? 

Edit:

There is no way I can or should complete this task from below. So late this afternoon I put the cutting disc to the s bolts that hold the rear bumper. I discovered that the splash pan comes off with the bumper, so two more bolts and it all drops to the floor, then eight body mount bolts and the body is separated from the frame. So the decision has been made.

Tomorrow Darlene and I drive up to the Bay Area so she can fly to Indianapolis to spend a week with our daughter and her husband, I'll be back to the car Wednesday afternoon. I'm going to roll the chassis forward so I can roll a low bed trailer under the body and take it to storage. 

Wish me luck, maybe I'll finish this task before my 80th birthday! 

 

 

Edited by pflaming

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Back from the Bay Area, I removed the rear bumper this afternoon. The splash pan removes with the bumper. Now I can get to the back body mounts, will cut them with my Sawzall. One of the most useful tools in my shop. Once all body bolts are cut, I will hoist the body up into the top of the shop. I can hoist it high enough so I can walk under it. Pictures tomorrow. 

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Update:  the body is now free from the chassis, but I'm watching the buildings structure and I now doubt that I should try to hang it from the building, so tomorrow I will raise it up from the floor to roll the chassis out, then back a low trailer under the body and haul it to storage. This is my first time to remove a body from the chassis. Very educational. 

Edit:  on second thought, I'm going to replace the body on the chassis pull the vehicle to where I can remove the body with a fork lift and store it there. Storage and forklift are free. I'll then return the chassis to my shop.  A much better  plan. 

Edit update: sat am. The body is back on the chassis, now arranging for a car trailer to haul it, remove the body, clean the chassis with a high powered steam pressure cleaner, then return the chassis to my shop. 

Edit:  when I got on the floor to cut those body mount bolts and I cleaned and primered the OD, I severely wretched my back and set off my carpel tunnel, darn, so will have to give this old body a good rest over the holidays. I guess I best not lift these transmissions any longer, got to find an easier way. 

 

 

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Edited by pflaming

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Doing small but necessary items. While working on electrical I scratched my dash so I pulled, resanded, primered and painted it. Will be very careful when I install it. Nicely polished chrome knobs, etc will liven it up. 

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