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dpollo

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dpollo last won the day on June 13 2018

dpollo had the most liked content!

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About dpollo

  • Rank
    Zen Master, I breathe vintage mopar!

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Vancouver Island BC
  • Interests
    Chrysler products, farm machinery, off grid power
  • My Project Cars
    in process 52 Dodge convertible . Finished : 35 Ply. coupe, 40 Ply. coupe 50 Ply sedan, 51 Ply Convertible 52 Fargo half ton , 28 Chrys roadster

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  • Biography
    have never been without a Plymouth or Dodge six since 1956
  • Occupation
    farmer

Converted

  • Location
    Vancouver Island BC Canada
  • Interests
    Old Farm machinery, Off grid power, Chrysler's products

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2,130 profile views
  1. Years ago I built a 265 for a friend with a 50 Plymouth. 040 overbore nice standard crank everything basically stock . This was to replace the tired out Canadian 218. two clutches, two transmissions and one differential later the thrill of extra horsepower and torque finally wore off. Good fun though.
  2. Bob is actually Dave. Strangely enough that confusion has followed me all my life.
  3. you will need to use the rear sump oil pan from your 218 as well as the oil pickup and the dip stick . It all fits.
  4. somewhere I have a book which lists rebuilt engine specs. Engines were grouped by what the rebuilt was intended to fit . This did not necessarily reflect the engine's original engineering code which was stamped along with the engine number. Most tags I have seen gave the bore OS and the main and rod US . These, if standard, were marked std. I do not have time to search this out for you today but will follow your thread. Independent rebuilders had a number of codes . The only reliable way to determine what any particular engine may be at this late date is to tear it down and measure everything.
  5. if you look on the door flange level with the lock you will find a set screw which holds the lock cylinder in place, be careful, if you strip out the slot, you will have to drill this out. soak first, good luck.
  6. better send me a PM with your # and I will call close to the estimated time of arrival
  7. i think that you are correct. I will be passing through Kamloops on Thursday and usually stop at the A&W near Vicars Rd and the Hwy. usually it is after 2 by the time I get that far if you want the cylinder. head perhaps we can meet or I can simply take it as far as Enderby.
  8. only three bolts hold the MC in place. It may be the easiest part of the job.
  9. remove the master cylinder and then remove the nut on the clutch pedal arm there is a tapered pin which can be driven out with a punch, remove the grease fitting and slide the pedal arm off its shaft. the shaft will then slide out towards the middle of the car.
  10. directional signals first made their appearance on the 39 Buick
  11. as Dodge B4ya says, line locks are not intended to be parking brakes. The option offered in 49-50 was called a hill-holder which kept the rear brakes on until you drove away making it easier to start off on hills. By law, a parking brake must be mechanical. They are easily understood.
  12. don't forget, your pistons are .060 over so displacement is now 260 cu. inches. another bonus may be that the crankshaft you are planning to use is still standard and in serviceable condition. dp
  13. most of these cars had a link which opened the throttle about 1/3 way when the starter pedal was pushed. Trucks still used foot starters well into the 50s. Ford trucks, had a button on the dash. ( advanced design.... not really, the location of the starting motor made it impossible to use a foot starter unless it was just a switch )
  14. Probably this is the first time off the island since it arrived in '38. My 37 Plymouth which I owned from '68 to '98 was an island car. It sold new in Victoria for $1173 at Begg Motors. Just before I got it, it had completed a trip to Trail BC and back. A leaky head gasket and bad water distribution tube caused piston failure in # 4 cylinder . Surprisingly, no ring failure but it could not have run very well. An overbore of .050 was needed to clean things up. ( at 54000 miles) Before BC Ferries started operation in the mid 50s, it was not so very easy to come and go by car to the mainland. As a result there were a lot of older low mileage cars available in the Victoria area.
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