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James_Douglas

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James_Douglas last won the day on January 29

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About James_Douglas

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    Guru, have been a long time contributor

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    http://www.dacoglu.com/cars.htm
  • Biography
    I am just a geek who likes old cars. We drive a 1947 Desoto Suburban as our daily driver.
  • Occupation
    Technology

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    San Francisco
  • Interests
    Planes, Trains, and Automobiles

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  1. Time Left: 29 days and 23 hours

    • WANTED
    • USED

    I am looking for a late 1953 or 1954 Desoto or Chrysler SIX powerflite transmission and all its associated items. I plan on retro-fitting it into my 1947 Desoto. I need not only the six cylinder transmission and the bell housing to block adapter and the torque converter, which is different than the 8 cylinder, but I need all the linkage, the brackets on the firewall and the brackets on the engine block, the linkage from the steering column to the transmission, the block to transmission bell housing brackets (different than the stick or fluid drive ones), the cable for the parking brake, the transmission cross member which bolts out (just the center part). Basically, all the items related to the transmission. In 99.9% of the cases, people will just junk all of that. For a successful retrofit, I will need all of it. If anyone has recently found a 265 and has any of those parts, please do not toss them and let me know. If someone runs across a car and plans on pulling the engine and does not need all those parts, then please let me know. Thanks, James

    NO VALUE SPECIFIED

  2. People with or looking for a 265 - A request View Advert I am looking for a late 1953 or 1954 Desoto or Chrysler SIX powerflite transmission and all its associated items. I plan on retro-fitting it into my 1947 Desoto. I need not only the six cylinder transmission and the bell housing to block adapter and the torque converter, which is different than the 8 cylinder, but I need all the linkage, the brackets on the firewall and the brackets on the engine block, the linkage from the steering column to the transmission, the block to transmission bell housing brackets (different than the stick or fluid drive ones), the cable for the parking brake, the transmission cross member which bolts out (just the center part). Basically, all the items related to the transmission. In 99.9% of the cases, people will just junk all of that. For a successful retrofit, I will need all of it. If anyone has recently found a 265 and has any of those parts, please told toss them and let me know. If someone runs across a car and plans on pulling the engine and does not need all thos parts, then please let me know. Thanks, James Advertiser James_Douglas Date 09/19/2019 Price Category Individual Member Classified Wanted Ad  
  3. I went and looked at some old photos of my body, 1947 Desoto, with the front clip off and I counted at least 5 bolts on each side at the cowl. James
  4. If you swap the head onto a new block, use clay and check the valve to head clearance. Sometimes the DECK of the blocks have been cut and you can stick a head on that has been milled and the valves will hit. Better to be safe than sorry.... James
  5. As someone who has used a fluid drive in a daily driver for 18 years, they can be fine. I have had a seal go, even one that was supposedly rebuilt. Once you get one that is good and take care of it, it will last a very long time. Since I run mine in a Desoto Suburban, with the very high curb weight, if it will live in that car and the hills of San Francisco from a dead stop, it will live in anything else. A few thoughts. Read my long winded paper on fluid to use so you get a good understanding on how the thing works. If one goes to take it out, make 4 wooden wedges with a slot on the large end and tap them in light between the flywheel and the coupling BEFORE you take a transmission out. What you do it take the lightly the 4 blocks then run a length of bailing wire around them to keep them in place. You have to spin it around to do this. You do this for shipping and on the installation as well. If you do not, the flexing of the plate can crack the carbon seal and it will leak. The special products shop at DACCO transmission was closed down about 24 months ago then they went bankrupt and was purchased by another company. So as of today, I do not know of anyone that can cut open a fluid coupling and replace the inner bearing. The pinion bushing and seal can be done from the outside, but that bearing requires it to be cut open. The issues, unlike a torque converter, is that without a flex plate, the two sides of the coupling have to be perfect when welded together. Even a couple of torque converter shops I have talked with say they do not have the jigs to do it. They could make up a jig, but the cost would be in the 3K to 5K range for the first one. NEVER open the plug on a fluid coupling unless the engine has been off for at lease 4 hours. If you pull the plug and take a Popsicle stick, you can rotate the inner hub around you will see some larger holes than the many smaller ones as you spin it around. A local three generation repair shop, Bob Senior is 85 and looks better than most 50 year olds, told me that if the thing fails on the road, to have a correctly sized bolt in the glove box to fit the threading in the outer shell oil plug (the plug TPI) and grind lower end of the bolt to just fit the larger inner hole size, the better the fit the better as you want no slop. On the road, take the plug out and rotate the thing down to 6 O'clock and drain out all the fluid, on the ground if hung out someplace. When it is all out, rotate the unit back up to the floor board hole to get at it. Then run bolt, with a copper washer under the head into the coupling and the inner hub large hole. The inner hub is the part that is attached to the transmission pinion. The outer shell is the part that is attached to the crankshaft. The bolt "connects" the outer (the crankahsft) to the inner hub which is connected to the transmission. Use a VERY good grade 5 or 8 bolt. Once done, you can drive it like a three speed stick. Good luck, James. PS. If some of the above reads weird...I am home after two surgeons spend 4 hours in my lower back. My head is not quite clear and I am looking at a month stuck in our flat here in SF.
  6. I have been through this more times that I want to remember. In California here is the issues: 1. The local CA-DMV offices know nothing. In fact they know less than nothing when it comes to the old plates or transfering and registering old cars. They get it wrong about 90% of the time. Do not call them or go see them unless you have talked to the SPU. See item #4 below. The SPU IS THE FINAL AUTHORITY ON ALL TRANSFER, REGISTRATION, AND PLATE ISSUES IN CALIFORNIA. All DMV offices have to defer to them. 2. About 10 years ago CA-DMV sent to the garbage heap all the old records of the cars. Due to that actress that got killed 25 years ago and the state legislature prohibiting the CA-DMV from giving out personal information from its records, they had no reason and no financial incentive to hang onto the records. All they will tell you is if that plate is currently registered to a car. If the car has been out of the system for more than about 5 years, they will not have anything on it. 3. You MUST have two plates. (1946 CA cars only had one). 4. Call the CA-DMV special processing unit in Sacramento if you can get anyone to answer the phone. The last number I had for them is (916) 657-8035, it may be good or not. 5. If you really want to run that plate, Go to the local DMV and see if you can get that as a "NEW" black specialized plate. Just run one old one with one of the new ones. Even a CHP would probably not notice. Of course you can always get a set of old orange plates and use them under the YOM (Year of Manufacture program) if you want for a 1953 car. 6. Under no circumstance take an old pate to the CA-DMV and hand it to them. You will never see it again. 7. Read and understand item #1. Then read it again! Good luck, James
  7. Finally had some time to get the car apart today. I got the passenger side down to the spindle and measured it with a dial indicator and the spindle end plat was about .002 to .003. That 1954 Motors Motor Manual book had an entry that said to make sure you have .008 or tightness and wandering car happen. That is what is going on. In addition to that, the upper outer side of the king pin has some fairly good galling. You can see it in the photo. This is with 3K miles on it. I suspect that the line honing of the bushings in the Sunnen honing machine with oil provided too good of a fit. The pin fit like a high tolerance bearing. Spun perfect no movement. I suspect that the clearance was so good that no grease could get in there to create a film and hence the galling. I took out my new period reamer and ran the bushings. I did get some material. The pin now spins just the same but there must be more space given that material that was taken off. I also took out one shim and now have .0085 end play. The spindle definitely is more free than it was. It was free before, just a little more now. It will be interesting to see if the drivers side has the same issues. Once it is all done, over the next 3 to 5 days, it will be interesting to see if the steering is any different with all other things not being touched. James.
  8. On the future rebuild of my 265... I am thinking of doing a by-pass filter like this one, but, finding a VERY fine filter for it. In addition to this, I plan on doing a modification I saw some years back. That owner drilled and tapped the area of the oil pump. They put a plug in the gallery from the oil pan and forced the oil out and into a full flow head and filter mounted on the right frame rail. It them went back into the gallery and to the pump. I got the idea from an article I read a long time ago from a Fram executive who was talking with The Big Three about increased engine life by have a two stage oil filtration system. Fram had showed a great increase in engine life with their tests. But, the Big Three were concerned about the additional cost. I have been using the big full flow canister on my 251 and it works well. This is the conversion that Don used and documented on this forum. The only problem is that with that unit, you have to take it off to get the starter out. I do like the bottom valve to drain it before pulling the filter however. James.
  9. Don't shoot the messenger...should you not be out on the beach someplace :-)
  10. There was a Chrysler technical note, I have it someplace, that they went to a special switch to deal with problems of them going out. It turns out that the flow of the electrons was the problem. They came out of the switch that has a long and short post and was therefore polarity sensitive. When they went to 12 volt, I suspect it was not longer an issue. I pulled my binder with the service bulletin...
  11. My Desoto Suburban has those big ass drums. I took the front off and went to disc's so it stops with less wander at freeway speeds. If I were to do the swap, I would look to see if the knuckle arm height was the same to that one could swap the spindle. BUT. One must be careful with a spindle swap as the kingpin inclination is set by the casting of the spindle and the geometry of the steering knuckle and the control arms. I am not sure if the smaller and large spindles have the same KPI. James.
  12. I would be more concerned about the amount of crap in the jackets from just looking at the photo. Since the cost per a sleeve is several hundred dollars done correctly, you can find a better core for that price. James
  13. That is a good short to the point article. I have been trying to find something like it in my radial and front end alignment thread. I contacted SEMA on that and they do not have anything. This is good on the wheels. But, On my 1947 I had a new set of wheels built as I have disc's on it. I have had micro cracks where the centers meet the wheel. They did not dress the center "edges" before pressing it in and welding it. The weight of my big 1947 Suburban plus the radial stiffness causes the center to flex and the sharp edges to "dig in" to the wheel outer rim and cause the cracks. We have over welded them a couple of times. I finally just put a set of tubes in. They do make a wheel where the center is round and not attached on four points. I may have a set like that made up as they do a continuous weld to the wheel outer rim on that one.... James.
  14. "Not to be blunt but that seems like a lot of effort for something that is well known. You need positive caster for stability no matter what kind of car it is." Then why did the Engineers at Chrysler have the cars in 1949 go with negative one to negative three degrees of castor? My issue is that there is a lot of common mythology running around and too little data on the subject of radial tires on cars that were not designed for them. That is why I am trying to run down facts, data and not repeated "well know" suggestions. James.
  15. Yep, that is what I mean....
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