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austinsailor

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Everything posted by austinsailor

  1. austinsailor

    What was my original engine?

    As to putting the 23" block in, I did this in a Fargo. I welded an extension on the front motor mount, bolted it in. Add a fan shroud and find hoses to fit, you're done. Rear is the same, nothing moves. As to your present block,invest in a pan gasket. Pull the pan, get some plastigauge, find out what your clearances are. You might get buy with some undersize bearings (.001 or .0015 under) if they are now standard. You may also find that your oil pump is worn. I'd do a little diagnostics before going the route you're suggesting.
  2. austinsailor

    Work bench height

    I find that whatever height they are, if I add casters so I can easily move things around, they are then about right. Being about 6'2", I find that most things are too low for me as they come. Casters solve 2 problems.
  3. I've seen these come apart as JBNeal describes. I agree, not worth the potiential problems.
  4. austinsailor

    Stupid carburetor!

    "I know you eliminated air leaks as a possible cause early on, but just to double check, wave an unlit propane torch, gas on, not lit, around the carb base, vaccum line connections, and all manifold to block connections." That certainly could fit my symptoms, although I'm not sure what could be leaking. I don't recall having this problem before changing motors, so it's more than likely. Wiper vacuum is already shut off, now all I have to do is locate a propane torch! Surely there is one somewhere in my shop. I did put on a different manifold to replace the original cracked one. To make it even more likely, I didn't realize the choke on this does not increase the idle setting, no connection between the manual choke and throttle. However, with just a bit of choke it runs reasonably well, just at a much higher speed. That would indicate it's getting air from somewhere, and the choke is making it rich enough to run. No choke, it's drawing too much air, mixture is too lean even if the idle circuit is working. Symptoms all fit, much as I hate to admit it this late in the game. Maybe I just need to put on one of my dual carb setups! That would make things simpler - not!
  5. austinsailor

    Stupid carburetor!

    Got my B1B running and driving well, except it won't idle. Have to keep it revved up a bit. I know the idle circuit in the carb is the problem, but I've had it apart a couple times and can find no problems. Pulled 4 other carbs off of other vehicles and all have set so long they'll all need a major rebuild before they do anyone any good. Not looking for help, just bitching! Oh, well, I'll eventually figure it out. In the meantime I'm getting in it and heading to the cafe for lunch.
  6. austinsailor

    Stupid carburetor!

    Well, I spent some time putting it back together. All looked good. No change. I'm missing something. When I get time I'll probably take another carburator that is in worse shape and start over with it. This is really frustrating.
  7. austinsailor

    influence of high octane...?

    My 40 dodge required something like 70 octane, according to the manual.
  8. austinsailor

    influence of high octane...?

    Our old cars have the fuel exposed to the atmosphere. Today's don't, with fuel injection and sealed systems. Today's gas evaporates much easier when exposed to the atmosphere. Has nothing to do with octane level. On another note relative to this thread - a few years ago I listened to a chemical engineer explain a lot of things to do with chemicals. Most was boring except his talk on gas and the different octane levels. As mentioned elsewhere in this trread, higher octane burns slower. Or more accurately, takes more to make it explode rather than burn evenly. When this guy explained it at the molecule level, it made sense. The higher the octane, the more even and rounded the molecule is. The lower the octane, the more jagged and odd shaped the molecule. So when it burns, the higher octane molecule has less surface exposed to the flame or heat, so it doesn't ignite as quickly. Sort of like trying to burn a stack of newspapers(high octane) or a crumpled up newspaper (low octane). The crumpled up one ignites nearly all at once, the stack slowly burns from the edges. In the fuel, the low octane starts burning all over, actually makes an explosion if hot enough, where the high octane doesn't have enough surface exposed to burn to the core at once unless it's really hot (higher compression). So, there it is, octane for dummies, something even I could understand!
  9. austinsailor

    CHANGE TITLE "Fuel Pump, Putz"

    I just read this entire thread, and am left with one question - why does anyone think welding a lump on the fuel pump arm will increase the stroke? It'll alter the starting point of the stroke, but not the distance. ???
  10. austinsailor

    Stupid carburetor!

    Yes, less than half. Thanks. NAPA failed me on this one!
  11. austinsailor

    Identifying a T786 motor

    Still trying to figure out what this motor is. I believe it's a 413 but can't find it listed anywhere. It's in about a 55 wrecker, may or may not be original.
  12. austinsailor

    Identifying a T786 motor

    Brian has a selection of molyblocks in his yard, including the 413 industrial in his truck he uses regularly. When he replaced the original 331 many years ago he found his starter pedal rubbed the block because it was wider. He and I measured several motors and found his industrial 413 was a bit wider, I think about 1/4". Head bolt to head bolt, where we measured them, were not the same.
  13. austinsailor

    Identifying a T786 motor

    All the 30" motors had 12 ports. I have a couple 331 ci motors, 12 ports.
  14. austinsailor

    Industrial engine into truck

    Probably also the distributor to get vacuum advance and proper advance curve.
  15. austinsailor

    Identifying a T786 motor

    The 413 block is a bit wider than the 331, although it's close enough you'd have to put a tape on it to tell. Not sure about a 377, never saw one to tell. when I saw this motor I thought it would be simple enough with the factory motor number, so I didn't check other details. I regret it now! not sure if it's stuck, so even if I was there checking the stroke might be a challenge. i asked here a few months ago and got no answer, was hoping someone new would see this and have some info. I suppose if I get serious enough I'll just have to make a trip.
  16. austinsailor

    Identifying a T786 motor

    If it in fact is.
  17. austinsailor

    Identifying a T786 motor

    If it in fact is.
  18. austinsailor

    Identifying a T786 motor

    Flathead 30" dodge molyblock. I'm 1500 miles away, so more details would be hard to get. I thought at the time the motor number would be sufficient, but it doesn't turn up anywhere. dual carbs, dual exhaust. don't know what an "Rb" is.
  19. austinsailor

    Stupid carburetor!

    I've been kind of quiet for a few days. My girlfriend decided it was time to pull the carpet out and tile my house (we'd talked about it for some time) and she was here volunteering to help. Stupid carburetor was put on hold and sat in the laquer thinner for days while we put in 12 hour days on tile. I did tile while she mixed mud, cut tile and mowed my yard and pulled weeds when her part was caught up. Carb could wait - I know my priorities! Almost done, so I slipped away last night and rinsed it, put it in WD 40 rust desolver (couldn't find any evapo-rust locally) overnight. That stuff did a good job. Slipped out a couple hours ago, washed it all, blew it out and put most of it together. Might get to finish tomorrow. I do have to wonder why a Carter BB kit has gone from around $21-$22 to about $50! How the heck did they manage that?
  20. austinsailor

    Stupid carburetor!

    Got a fresh kit in hand, carb is completely disassembled and soaking overnight in a gallon of lacquer thinner. For what it's worth, dwell, timing etc is all set. No vacuum leaks. Just a clog somewhere, I'm sure.
  21. austinsailor

    little Hit and Miss going on here

    Amish in this area still use them.
  22. There is someone else on the board who will ship his to you with a deposit. I'll let him jump in or PM you if he's inclined.
  23. austinsailor

    Stupid carburetor!

    Idle screw has no effect, in or out. Vacuum leak it would idle fast with some adjustment, in my case, when it's slow enough to go on the idle circuit it just dies. Seems pretty certain no gas is being delivered through the idle circuit, not so simple as to why. if you could still buy a decent carb cleaner that might get it solved. But I won't go down that political rabbit hole! i can, and do, still drive it. I just have to pull the choke enough to run the rpms up when I stop.
  24. austinsailor

    little Hit and Miss going on here

    When I was a teenager these were common at auctions and had no use, therefore kids could buy them cheap. 25 cents to a dollar or two. We'd run the heck out of them for no particular purpose. Put a 3-4 foot straight pipe on them, let them cackle. i wonder what happened to all of them?
  25. A word of caution. If these are riveted shoes you can probably tell their shape. If bonded, I've found many that have set for years the lining will come loose from the metal. Rust between them, aging of the glue or whatever. also, you might think of adding your state to your profile. If you are anywhere near you could borrow my brake adjusting tools. I have no idea where you are, though. Right now you'd have to wait till a guy in Kansas City is finished, though.
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