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NiftyFifty

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NiftyFifty last won the day on April 26 2016

NiftyFifty had the most liked content!

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About NiftyFifty

  • Rank
    Guru, have been a long time contributor

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Shilo ,MB Canada
  • Interests
    MOPAR
  • My Project Cars
    1950 Dodge D, 1967 Dodge Monaco 500

Contact Methods

  • Biography
    Forage Seed Seller, with a mechanic's heart!
  • Occupation
    Sales for Forage Seed

Converted

  • Location
    Oak Lake, Manitoba CAN
  • Interests
    sleds, mechanincs

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  1. 5/16 line is pretty easy to bend, aluminum is more prone to kinks and cracks. Get a $20 princess auto bender and your golden, now 3/8” line I just did for my 67 Monaco...that sucked, and maybe aluminum would have been nicer
  2. Why do you want aluminum line?? Fuel lines should be steel, just head to CTire or Piston Ring and you can get a roll for $30-40. Even copper is acceptable in low pressure applications, but aluminum would be more for efi or just plain show if you wanted to polish the line.
  3. A lot....lol hood and front sheet metal supports(two bars from the firewall) have to be removed and the fan blade and water pump pulley usually, past that my mind is blank.
  4. I got a new collapsible shaft from Summit or alike in the DD format, that is an absolute must, but you will have to cut it, so you need to know both full extension and full collapse when you set everything up. And full extension needs to be springs hanging for awhile with no upward pressure, if your truck sees a hoist like mine does, you dont want that u joint holding the weight of the axle up because it's too short for full travel. I actually put limiters in for the max ability to collapse so I wasn't chancing any touching of the rack and oil pan or alike, but my front springs are a bit worn out.
  5. Do you have the Langdon distributor or the Frankenstein slant 6 one? My Langdon has be fantastic so far, and easier to get parts up here for it, then a new points and condenser, but typically electronic ignition works or it doesn’t, not much intermittent usually. Is your carb bowl always full?
  6. Just finished our big SuperRun week here in Manitoba, was a great turn out and beautiful but hot weather. I put the truck in with a couple of my old sleds on a deck I built for the show...funny how much interest there was in snowmobiles in 90 deg weather 😆
  7. It’s not a high gloss paint job, and factoring in that a lot of parts, trim, screws and clips will be missing or some un useable, needing everything that would go into it to put it back on the road, I’d say you have a $4-6000 truck there that will be hard to move to anyone except someone with the knowledge of what goes where and how. It is a bit of a blank slate for customization, but then again being a 3/4 ton hurts it, and again knowing what all would be needed to build, it needs another $10,000+ just to fully complete. Sadly all the above comments are true on your investment value and paying for bodywork doesn’t increase the value, it just puts it in line with any truck done properly at home.
  8. Sounds right, been forever since I measured things. Not sure if a set screw would do much to hold when it can’t bite into anything, but better then nothing, and the way mine is it’s not going anywhere anyway with it holding the adapter on the inside tie rod end
  9. Looks like a hair crack to me as well, but honestly if your using sealer on both sides in the saddle, then it should plug that too. PA might be on the right path too, is it bent a bit?
  10. I have been working on ol rufus and laid out the omni rack every thing looks ok. When you posted a picture of your tie rod modification is that a solid stock drilled out to to fit both the rack and the old dodge tie rods? I could not locate any discussion on the tie rod ends. thanks for the help.

    1. NiftyFifty

      NiftyFifty

      Good to hear, yes I had a machine shop drill out solid stock, think it was around 1 1/4”, 1/2 way for inner tie rod tap size and 1/2 way for outer. Only thing I would change is you should have a jam nut against both ends, I only did the inner side because the outer was very very tight to get on anyway.

       

      i also used two of the same r/h thread outlets, vs original uses one r/h and one l/h 

    2. garyanna2

      garyanna2

      Thanks heading to the metal shop and have that done as well as putting 90 on the 1/4" plate. The slant six fit real well removed it to do this work and hook up the brakes. I finely see some light at the end of this build.

       

  11. You need to remove the trans, flywheel and the bell housing bolts, however I found it much easier to pull the engine with the bell housing attached, as getting the flywheel bolts off can be pretty difficult.
  12. Really not sure what you would gain, and the chances of a belt fitting might be difficult as well, almost have to build it around a certain belt, and then make sure you have a spare if it’s not a popular size, and find a tensioner that would work properly as well. I would go double V belt and run the AC off it’s own dedicated belt and water pump, alt, p/s pump off the other, or could split it up differently
  13. Someday I’ll get back down there, I just hated trailering all that way, and a few bad memories from the past trip have kinda kept me and wife from really getting the urge to go back, but one of these years I’ll make the journey....hopefully tho in a 440 powered swept line
  14. http://p15-d24.com/topic/37458-converting-to-rack-and-pinion-power-steering/#comments
  15. Here is about the best I can do, just remember everything you add is a parasitic draw on the engine, so if your running a stock 218 your going to eat up a couple ponies to drive accessories
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