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Uncle-Pekka

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Uncle-Pekka last won the day on March 25 2015

Uncle-Pekka had the most liked content!

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About Uncle-Pekka

  • Rank
    the Breeze - I keep blowing down the road...
  • Birthday 11/25/1962

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  • Website URL
    http://public.fotki.com/mobilisti/1948-dodge-d24-cust/
  • Biography
    Born in early 60's, raised in a country village/small town in Finnish west coast
  • Occupation
    Sales engineer, industrial drives

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Jyvaskyla, Central Finland
  • My Project Cars
    1948 Dodge D24 Custom 4D sedan, mounted a R10 OD (taken from a '54 Savoy)

Converted

  • Location
    Jyväskylä Central Finland, '48 D24 4D
  • Interests
    1948 Dodge D24 Custom 4D sedan, late serial nr. probably Dec. '48 or Jan. '49

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  1. Uncle-Pekka

    Electrical issues

    Hi 49wind - Did you mentioned, that your ampere meter was "clicking"? I've noticed that it does clicking noises (and whips needle from zero to full) if there's a short circuit somewhere in the system. Notice, that there are no fuses for starter, generator nor for the lights. Check all the wiring and replace every suspicious cable. The ones for courtesy lights are the hardest to follow. Unfortunately they are also most prone for short circuit by loosing insulative cover, because they run between the roof and head liner where it gets very hot due the sun.
  2. Uncle-Pekka

    1942 chrysler windsor

    Congratulations for the awesome find, Monsieur Adrian! I like the 1942 C the best of all 40's Mopars, it has clean design, the best looking front end and the coolest brightwork. The 40's Mopars drive as good as any 50's US car and the flathead engines are reliable as work horse. Grab it, enjoy it, and keep us posted! The P15-D24 forum is the best web page for any informatio or advise you possible will ever need. Welcome to our crowd!
  3. Uncle-Pekka

    Old car heaven

    Mouth watering Mopars, indeed! Great collection. Would be very interesting auction to attend.
  4. Uncle-Pekka

    Interesting photos I have run across.

    Never seen such set up live. Would you care to share the story behind this picture? I'd be interested. The lathe is small, for a particular purpose? I guess it takes power from the car transmission? Is there a special clutch or do you need to jack up the rear end while turning...?
  5. Uncle-Pekka

    How to keep the mice away?

    Cats. The. Only. Logical. Answer.
  6. Uncle-Pekka

    Fire at Country Classic cars

    Also Hemmings covered the accident. https://www.hemmings.com/blog/2017/08/09/five-alarm-fire-causes-extensive-damage-at-country-classic-cars/?refer=news
  7. Uncle-Pekka

    Detail question on the wheel cylinder rubber sealings

    After searching the cabinets I found my parts book. Looks like there's only one part number for the piston and piston seal, the cylinder end boot as well. Thus the conclusion would be the rubber sealings must be the same for all rear, front upper & lower cylinders, see below page...
  8. Uncle-Pekka

    Detail question on the wheel cylinder rubber sealings

    Thanks Tim, Yes, mine is the common 4D sedan, thus 11" drums. Now that I take a closer look, the Dorman 12222 says bore 1 1/8, all other say 12" drum, thus the first one would fit all my wheel cylinders. Thanks again, Pekka
  9. Uncle-Pekka

    Detail question on the wheel cylinder rubber sealings

    It's been years I opened the brake drum, thus I cannot recall the dimensions in detail. The question is; Are the front wheel upper and lower cylinder diameters the same? (thus the rubber sealings would be the same size) See the below "RockAuto" catalog; E.g. WK112 kit would fit "front upper" and rear wheel cylinder, but not "front lower"...? I see front lower has some extra metal pins, but those have much longer life time than the rubber. Thus the question is; If I simply keep 2-3 sets of Dorman 12222 or Raybestos WK112 in by garage drawer, am I equipped to service whichever wheel in my D24? Thanks, Uncle-Pekka
  10. It's been years I opened the brake drum, thus I cannot recall the dimensions in detail. The question is; Are the front wheel upper and lower cylinder diameters the same? (thus the rubber sealings would be the same size) See the below "RockAuto" catalog; E.g. WK112 kit would fit "front upper" and rear wheel cylinder, but not "front lower"...? I see front lower has some extra metal pins, but those have much longer life time than the rubber. Thus the question is; If I simply keep 2-3 sets of Dorman 12222 or Raybestos WK112 in by garage drawer, am I equipped to service whichever wheel in my D24? Thanks, Uncle-Pekka
  11. Uncle-Pekka

    More Miller Factory Tools

    More Miller tools...
  12. Uncle-Pekka

    1930 Dodge "off road" promo video

    "True Spirit of Motoring!"
  13. Uncle-Pekka

    Offy dual intake

    Hi T-bag, Is it like the one offered by Summit Racing? See below?
  14. Uncle-Pekka

    Replacing D24 upper control arm outer bushings

    Thanks! I guess I'll be first replacing only the outer bushings. When having the outer bushing off, I suppose it will be easy to check the inner shaft play when there's no load in it?
  15. Uncle-Pekka

    Dash knob repaint?

    Casper, I've been painting those engraved texts using the method familiar from scale model painting, commonly referred as "black washing" (In this case "white washing..???) Anyway it is based on capillary attraction of the paint, thus the paint needs to be just correct thinned - about the same as for air brush. Use thin point brush and lightly touch the tip to the bottom of the letter, the paint will run down the groove and fill it nicely. You probably need to do the top and bottom part of a letter by two touch. A scale model enamel paint is easy to work with, Humbrol or Tamiya are the best quality available commonly. Also One Shot striping enamel should do good. You will need to do it a couple of time to get the touch, but with enamels it is safe, since you can easily wipe the excess off with a rag and turpentine.
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