JBNeal

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JBNeal last won the day on March 1

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About JBNeal

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  1. additional information
  2. FWIW I recently tried the candle wax trick on The Blue Bomber's downpipe flange bolts before upgrading to the 4" exhaust...after the 1 hr drive back from work, I would apply the wax til it ran off the flange, did that for over a week...I was pleasantly surprised when not only did they back out, but they didn't even squeak a peep...totes amazeballs
  3. FYI I put a mini-tach on my old 4cyl Dakota that required the cup to be removed to access a toggle switch for 4, 6 or 8 cyl use...it had a 4th wire for its backlight
  4. The cursory reading of this build card has yielded some interesting information. The format of the build card appears to have changed mid-year 1951, and this format includes more optional equipment. I have no idea where this truck was delivered as the destination is not recognizable. The build date of August 19, 1953 was later in the model year than I originally estimated; the body numbers match as well as the engine number. However, my engine appears to be spray painted ford blue, so I am guessing that it might have been rebuilt at some point. I have not seen a rebuild tag on this block, but it might be located behind the starter and out of sight. column 23 and 60: color code 6 punched for each but I am unsure of what hue this should be or if this is the paint code for the two tone treatment column 640: code 1 punched as this truck has a factory rear bumper column 641: code 1 punched as this truck has factory front bumper guards This truck does not appear to have any special equipment, powertrain upgrades, or interesting options other than being a long bed half ton Express model with that rare two-tone paint job...I'll have to do some more digging to find out more information on this truck
  5. The cursory reading of this build card has yielded some interesting information. This Dodge had spent almost its entire existence in the Texas Panhandle and Western Oklahoma before I dragged it home in 2001. The story I was told of its origins went back to the original owner in Western OK, who passed away in the 90s, and his widow never drove the truck so it sat for years before she passed away. Their son sold it to the man I bought it from in Shamrock, who never got around to fixing it up and had to downsize due to health issues. The build date of February 4, 1949 is 3 years to the day prior to Mom's birthday...she found that amusing. The body numbers match, and the truck still has its original engine. column 29: Dodge Truck Green appears to be color code 5 column 31: 4.1 axle ratio appears to be ratio code 4 column 32: full-floating axle appears to be axle code 3 column 34-38: the wheels are 16 x 5.5 lock ring for single wheel one tons, so the tires are probably 7.00-16 or 7.50-16 for tire code 19 column 39: could be SHIP VIA punched out; I am guessing this is a mode of shipment code for truck, train or ship column 44: rear spring code D appears to be an optional rear spring setup for the single wheel one ton column 48: shock absorber code 3 appears to be an optional shock absorber package for the optional springs column 49: transmission code 1 appears to be the 4 speed spur gear option column 54: code 3 punched for bumpers; I am unsure if this means front bumper with grill guards or no rear bumper column 55: code 1 punched for delux.body; this truck has cab corner windows, door vent windows, vacuum windshield wipers, and driver visor; no dome light nor arm rest column 60: code 5 punched for mirrors; this truck has the driver side telescoping mirror arm column 63: code 5 punched for air cl. o. f.; this truck has a 1 quart fluid capacity oil-bath air filter No codes are punched for optional generator, visor, battery, or special accessories, so this truck appears to be a work truck model with a deluxe cab. The custom rear bumper that has been attached to this buggy for over half a century will probably be replaced with a nicer looking unit, and I will have to do something with the aftermarket heater as it probably needs a good cleaning and leak-tested...I plan on adding functional seat belts and maybe some sort of radio, but that's a little ways off yet. So another piece of the puzzle has been found and a picture of what my goals are for this project have become clearer.
  6. The cursory reading of this build card has yielded some interesting information. My great-grandfather's Dodge has spent almost its entire existence in Texas, being delivered in Mineola before finding its way to the Ira Young Plymouth - Dodge Truck dealership in nearby downtown Temple. And as Dad pointed out to me, the only time the truck left Bell County for the next 19 years was to cross the border to the cotton gin or feed store 20 miles north in Moody...Dad then drove it to Lubbock for a year cuz Papa was nearly 90 and couldn't drive the thing anymore, and after Dad finished college, it went back to work as a farm truck for another 9 years before it got parked for burning too much oil and didn't want to start when it was below 50 or when it rained. The build date of June 23, 1948 was later in the model year than I originally estimated, but the truck has the "early" bed fenders; the body numbers match. The motor number of T142-31870 jives with the title I have for the truck, as that is the truck's documented VIN...and since the truck has had a '55 Plymouth 230 in it since sometime in the 60s, the title VIN is no where to be seen on the truck, which gets kinda tricky to explain to the uneducated state vehicle inspectors. column 29: Dodge Truck Green appears to be color code 5 column 31: 4.1 axle ratio appears to be ratio code 4 column 32: semi-floating axle appears to be axle code 1 column 34-38: the wheels are 16 x 4 disc, so the tires are probably 6.00-16 or 6.50-16 for tire code 4 column 39: could be SHIP VIA punched out; I am guessing this is a mode of shipment code for truck, train or ship column 54: code 3 punched for bumpers; I am unsure if this means front bumper with grill guards or no rear bumper column 55: code 3 punched for delux.body; this truck has cab corner windows, door vent windows, electric windshield wipers, dome light, and driver visor and arm rest column 63: code 5 punched for air cl. o. f.; this truck has a 1 quart fluid capacity oil-bath air filter No codes are punched for optional springs, shocks, transmission, generator, visor, mirrors, battery, or special accessories, so this truck appears to be an economy model with a deluxe cab or it may have been a custom cab that had been updated sometime in the 60s as the vinyl seat covering and door panels are not original. The custom rear bumper that has been attached to this buggy for over half a century will stay, and I will not be adding a heater as I don't like to drive this truck when it gets below 40...I plan on adding functional seat belts and maybe some sort of radio, but that's a little ways off yet. So another piece of the puzzle has been found and a picture of what my goals are for this project have become clearer.
  7. After cross-referencing the factory parts manual, I am thinking the AIR CL. O.F. stands for Air Cleaner Oil-Bath Filter, with either a 1 pint or 1 quart fluid capacity. Depending on the truck's standard equipment, upgrading to a 1 quart could have been an option. The punches for running boards and rear fender have me stumped; maybe it has something to do with the chassis model...? On p.13 of Bunn's Bible, there is a picture of a cab and chassis model with running boards and fenders but no bed.
  8. Three weeks after re-submitting my requests from eight months ago, I received a bigger envelope and was very surprised to see my three request payment checks paper clipped to my letter explaining the quality of the original build cards...welllll allrighty then
  9. additional information
  10. A closeup of the hub splines and the opposite side of the grips might help to determine where this belongs
  11. additional information
  12. I have gotten a few spares cheap on eBay, rebuilt a couple and they ran fine...make sure they aren't rusted stuck...adapting to a 2 bbl might require a new throttle linkage...choose widely
  13. Removing the hood is a zero cost step in the diagnosis of a truck that has an engine and a radiator installed that was not originally designed for the engine compartment. Another step is to put the hood back on and remove the side access panels to monitor heat being removed from the system, another zero cost diagnostic step. If there is no change in the heat being released by the cooling system, then the air flow through the radiator is not the problem, so any modifications made to sheet metal (adding louvers) will have no effect. So the diagnostic procedure shifts back to the cooling system's ability to remove heat from the engine. As there has been coolant flowing observed with the engine running, then the water pump is working, but maybe not effectively...removing the thermostat has been observed as having no effect, another zero cost diagnostic step...next is to change rad.caps to lower pressure ratings, preferably what that system was originally designed for...possibly might need an infrared thermometer to see if any hotspots in the system...if still no change but high heat in the system, engine may be running too lean...so the diagnosis now focuses away from the cooling system and towards the heat generation... but bottom line, starting with no cost system modifications is an economical approach to high heat diagnosis