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JBNeal

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JBNeal last won the day on December 22 2018

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About JBNeal

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    Unleaded Contributor

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    76564
  • My Project Cars
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  • Biography
    [edited for content]
  • Occupation
    Mechanical Engineer

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  • Location
    76564
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  1. JBNeal

    Me and the B-1-D

    horn button information
  2. JBNeal

    Engine problem

    To clarify: you can estimate engine rpm by sound and by calculating using indicated speed, tire diameter, axle ratio, etc. When the problem occurs while in motion, estimate engine rpm, then try to duplicate the problem with the truck parked but increasing engine rpm. If the problem cannot be duplicated while parked, then the problem has a vibration or momentum component... I always fall back on checking ground continuity on these old buggies, as they are prone to electrical issues when corrosion is present at every path to ground. One way to verify continuity is to run temporary jumper wires that parallel a circuit...this is one way I found that my ignition coil on my '48 had a weak ground path, as a jumper from the coil ground to battery ground really woke that engine up during testing...I replaced the defective wires, cleaned mechanical attachment surfaces and lubricated threads with electrical contact grease to displace moisture, and the engine had more noticeable power climbing hills... Your issue sounds like some kind of dithering, which could be indicative of a weak ground path or insufficient fuel delivery...I would not rule out a fuel issue just yet, but my experience is that fuel issues have a surge effect, as fuel pressure gradually falls off until ignition terminates, but engine momentum allows mechanical fuel pumps to continue to build pressure, so ignition may start up again as long as the engine continues to spin and spark delivery continues. Electrical issues have a more rapid effect, either complete ignition shutdown or rapid interruption of signal. Dithering in these low voltage system can best be determined with analog multi-meters as they can show real-time results with needle bouncing, whereas digital multi-meters tend to have slow, intermittent results that can hide the peaks and valleys of current delivery. If the engine problem can be duplicated with the truck parked and engine rpm increased, then the analog multi-meter will be needed to check voltages at increased engine speeds...this will greatly aid in zeroing in on any electrical issues
  3. JBNeal

    B3 Cowl Vent Hose

    That rubber plug is in the vacuum wiper hose firewall hole... After further review, I don't think the drain hose had a grommet, just sorta sits in the hole for B-1 cabs, allowing any "air" in the engine compartment to seep into the cab... The B-2 cab I have by the house, as well as the B-3 & B-4 cabs, all have the flanged hole that better seals the cab from the engine compartment
  4. JBNeal

    Me and the B-1-D

    battery tray information battery cable information
  5. JBNeal

    B3 Cowl Vent Hose

    My '48, '49, and late '53 all have a rubber hose attached to the drainage nipple, routed through a firewall grommet
  6. JBNeal

    Long journey

    additional information
  7. JBNeal

    Dodge 1950 B2 Pilothouse

    These trucks did not have a fuse box from the factory, but if ya get creative, you could have fuses and relays and whutnot
  8. JBNeal

    Me and the B-1-D

    I asked Dad why the rear fenders were so tore up on the '48 while the rest of the truck was fairly straight... He said that kind of damage always seemed to occur in the mud in the winter and early spring, sliding around trying to get in and out of cattle pasture gateways and either bouncing off of or hanging a fence post...I have a similar fender dent that can be figured by the truck sliding in the mud, with the rear yawing so that the tail light hooked a cedar post that tilted forward, slamming into the upper radius of the fender...the custom rear bumper was added years later
  9. JBNeal

    Dodge b series coding

    Maybe the "A" code was for preproduction runs... Route Vans were "DU" & "EU"... Maybe the "I" code looked too much like the number 1 or a lower case "l" which could cause confusion... When I worked for an OEM, we had certain production codes that were off-limits for a variety of reasons: some were to eliminate confusion, some were for tooling, some for prototypes, some for testing, etc.
  10. JBNeal

    Me and the B-1-D

    I had that brochure scanned and tried to get it posted in the downloads section awhile back, but a comedy of errors exacerbated by photobucket zapping it from my account kinda told me that it wasn't meant to be...I may try again later, but that all depends on if PB will play ball... As for windshield wiper parking, the B-1 and B-2 parked wipers outboard...I can tell you that swapping from vacuum to electric wipers requires not only changing the motor but the linkages and pivots as the geometries are different
  11. JBNeal

    Me and the B-1-D

    According to Bunn & Brownell's Dodge Pickups History and Restoration Guide, there were 31,110 1-tons made in the US for 1948, with 188,294 trucks manufactured that year... According to Bunn's Dodge B-Series Trucks Restorer's & Collector's Reference Guide and History, your truck appears to be sporting some Dodge Truck Dark Blue...
  12. JBNeal

    Me and the B-1-D

    Hey dual horns...NICE
  13. JBNeal

    1953 Dodge - What have I got into

    Dad told me when I started fiddlin' with the '48 while I was in high school: "quit playing with the steering wheel...if the motor don't run, ya ain't going anywhere...get the book and figure it out"
  14. JBNeal

    Me and the B-1-D

    wheel color information
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