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rekbender

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  1. Like
    rekbender reacted to Sam Buchanan in Electric fuel pump   
    I removed the mechanical pump and installed a 6v Carter pump just ahead of the rear axle. The same pump is also available for 12v and I ran one of those for many years on my kit-car.
     

     
    A 3/8" steel-braided hose connects the new tank to the pump, the rubber hose connects the pump to the new 5/16" fuel line to the carb. I ran a wire from the ignition switch back to the pump, it has a 10a in-line fuse at the switch. The pump works great and no regulator has been needed. I didn't want the pump piggy-backed onto any other circuit since this car is now electric pump dependent.
  2. Like
    rekbender reacted to Sam Buchanan in Installing a Spin-on Bypass Oil Filter (photos)   
    In a previous thread the discussion was centered around whether or not a bypass filter is needed and the best oil for our mature engines. Based on that discussion and pondering this topic for a few days after pulling the oil pan I decided to install a spin-on filter on my non-filtered engine. I've seen a couple of photos on the forum of filter installations but decided to offer a more complete tutorial for the benefit of owners who may want to explore a filter installation.
     
    I chose a mount and filter from Wix because they offer a mount and selection of filters that are specifically for bypass operation. Bypass filters are constructed differently from full-flow filters and provide a finer degree of filtration than conventional filters. I sourced the mount and filter from Rock Auto who have not only the filter I use but also the same filter in three additional lengths. I selected the next to shortest due to the confined space around the engine.
     
    Here is the mount, part number WIX 24755:
     

     
    Note the arrows indicating the proper direction of flow. This mount is only for bypass installations and has a small 5/8" nipple instead of the more common 3/4" seen on full-flow installations. It also has 1/8" NPT threads that allow 3/16" steel brake lines to be attached with only one 90* adapter.            
     

     
    The filter is WIX 51051:
     

     
     
    The other Wix bypass filters that fit this mount are 51050, 51320, and 51704.
     
    A bracket must be fabricated to attach the mount to the engine block. I used 1/8" steel and drilled it for the mount and two studs on the engine head:
     
     

     
    The two fittings on the engine accept 3/16" brake lines with no modification. I found 12" lines to be ideal for this installation. Accessing the fittings and getting the threads straight deep in the engine compartment is kinda tedious....just consider it a character-building experience. Permatex #2 (non-hardening) gasket sealer was used on the brass fitting where they screwed in the filter mount. I've seen teflon tape used in situations like this but that is risky in oil systems unless you really know what you are doing. A small sliver of tape that breaks loose can create havoc if it plugs an oil passage.
     
    A couple of thick washers are behind the bracket to provide clearance for the heads of the bolts securing the filter mount. The threads in the cylinder head are common 3/8" and the nuts on the studs are 3/8" fine thread. One of the studs backed out so I replaced it with a bolt.
     

     
    Prior to installing the filter I filled it with oil. This photo shows the difference between a bypass filter and full-flow---notice the tiny holes through which oil flows in/out of the filter. Filling the filter was very tedious....if I had to do this very often I would rig up some sort of syringe to push oil into the filter instead of spending 1/2 hour adding oil a fraction of an ounce at a time. The filter accepted a cupful of oil before it was satisfied.
     

     
    The finished installation complete with a note on the mileage and date of filter change. The oil lines need to be formed for clearance so the filter can be easily changed.
     

     
    Yes, this is not for those who want a period-correct engine bay, but I like having a modern filter which can be easily sourced through common channels. If my engine is happy....I'm happy.   
     
     
     
  3. Like
    rekbender reacted to Dodgeb4ya in Master Tech filmstrips great resources!   
    Mr tech and his training films...



  4. Like
  5. Like
    rekbender reacted to Sam Buchanan in brake adjustment tool--UPDATED   
    In a previous thread I showed how I made a brake adjustment tool using a length of steel tubing, some all-thread and a piece of angle. The tool worked fairly well but had some inherent imprecision due to the tubing not being a real tight fit on the axle threads. This was really obvious on the rear axles due to the threads being worn.
     
    I've modified the tool and it now works very nicely and accurately. Instead of the all-thread being welded to steel tube, it is welded to a 3/4"-16 nut. This removes any significant play in the indicator.
     

     
    Before removing the wheel drum, one minor cam adjuster is tightened enough to create noticeable drag on the drum. The drum is then removed and the brake tool is threaded onto the axle.
     

     
    The pointer is located over the portion of the shoe that contacted the drum which indicates the ID of the drum and adjusted for a snug fit on the shoe. If you want to get really fancy a 0.006" feeler gauge can be inserted between the pointer and shoe. I tried chalking the shoe to assist with indicating the high point during the initial adjustment but didn't find it to be of any advantage. Notice how these brand new shoes have not yet worn enough to have full contact with the drum. I'll readjust the brakes after some miles have accumulated on the shoes.
     
    Once the pointer is adjusted to match the high point of the shoe that was adjusted against the drum, the tool is swept over each shoe so the major and minor cam adjustments can be set so each shoe is concentric with the drum. Hopefully this will remove some of the mystery of adjusting the brakes and provide visual confirmation of proper adjustment.
     
  6. Like
    rekbender reacted to Craigdodge in Introduction   
    G'day.
    I found your site just now so I thought I would slip in while no one is looking.
    I have this 1955 D49 Aussie built Kingsway in pretty good nic, not the hemi only a flat six.
    Im not going to mod it to much just tyres and rims and set her low. so any suggestions on wheel and tyre widths would be appreciated.
    Cheers

  7. Like
    rekbender reacted to sser2 in Required maintenance for my ‘37 windshield crank?   
    The most critical lubrication point is worm gear. It has to be lubricated with moly or synthetic grease, applied in proper place and in proper quantity. WD40 may do more harm than good in a long run.

  8. Like
    rekbender got a reaction from Dodgeb4ya in Lets see pic of your trucks   
    This was my 1953 B4C. It had belonged to a horse farm in Kentucky. I sold it in 2009 to purchase a '36 Plymouth coupe. Has anyone seen this truck? 

  9. Like
    rekbender reacted to Young Ed in Show your tools.   
    It is a fan blade wrench. Makes tightening the bolts into the water pump way easier. Not something you'd use every day but it sure comes in handy when you use it
  10. Like
    rekbender reacted to desoto1939 in Show your tools.   
    Just purchased the Miller TruBrake Shoe grinding tool. This is a Mopar factory tool that was used to  grind the high spot off the brake linings and is done with the toll on each axle.  You also need to have the Miller MT Brake Tool which I have both of these tools. The picture was taken when the tool was attached to my work vise. The motor spins and the unit slides very nicely on the two arms.  This is the first that I have ever seen this tool. I have also attached the documentation that was copied from my Miller Tool catalog. This will explain the whole process of how the dealerships used both tools to get the brakes setup properly for each drum. Enjoy the reading and history lesson.
     
    To read about the tool go to the last picture and then double click on the link Miller Trubrake Document.
     
    Rich Hartung 



    Miller Trubrake Document.pdf
  11. Like
    rekbender reacted to joecoozie in Just HAD to buy this one....   
    This came up and I HAD to buy it.
    I am partial to Woodie Wagons so I was a goner from the get-go



  12. Like
  13. Like
    rekbender reacted to Gregarious13 in Show your tools.   
    Just picked up these from the local community college auto department. They replaced them with Chinese tools from harbor freight 🤔
     
    They are not allowed to sell them and can only  scrap or give away. I know someone there and he let me have them.
     
    Three phase grinder and 55 ton press. Grinder has 3 new wheels, 2" wide 12" diameter. It will take 30 years to wear them out!
     
    Greg


  14. Like
    rekbender reacted to Tom Skinner in Wishing Everyone a Merry Christmas   
    Merry Christmas everybody!

  15. Like
    rekbender reacted to desoto1939 in Wishing Everyone a Merry Christmas   
    Hope everyone and their loved ones have a  very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.  If you are traveling to family and or friends please drive safe and arrive back home safe and sound.
     
      Hope everyone arrives with Bells on. This is an old saying that refers back to when in the winter time you would use a horse a sleigh to gets to your destination.  If and when you got stuck in the snow the people that helped you get out of being stuck you would give them one of the sleigh bells that were attached to the horse as a way of saying thank you.  So if you made the entire round trip will the bells still on your horse then you had no issues, So then you arrived with Bells on your sleigh.  The bells were also used to warn other people on the road or going through the forest that a sleigh was approaching, so sort of our horn on our old cars.
     
    Since I live near Valley Forge PA I am thankful for all of the people that had stayed with General Washington at valley Forge during the winter encampment to help gain our Freedom and to form the Great United States of America. Least we forget about these strong willed men and boys that stood up to get this Great nation started and also to our current men and women that are serving in our Armed Forces to still support our freedom and to protect our great country.  If you know of any family that might have a person serving please tell the family that you thank them and their family member for their support.
     
    Rich Hartung
    Valley forge, PA
    Desoto1939@aol.com
  16. Like
    rekbender reacted to Bob Riding in Surprise! My Plymouth Wagon Is a Covergirl   
    I was absentmindedly thumbing through the latest issue of Old Cars Weekly, when I saw an ad saying there is still time to buy your "Old Cars Weekly Riders Ride 2019 Calendar" The B&W picture was a woodie that had to be a '40-'41 Plymouth. They are the only production woodie wagons that I know of that all four doors are full rectangles -all other have a dogleg cutout for the second set of doors. As I looked closer I realized that it was MY wagon! I had forgotten that I sent pictures to OCW six months ago for the 2019 calendar, but they never told me I had made the cover! Below is a picture of when I found the wagon on eBay in 2003, and last year after I had it pretty much finished. So I guess I should say get your calendar now?



  17. Like
    rekbender reacted to Don Coatney in Need Ideas for Converting Coins into Paper Money   
    I agree. And if they did try and charge me I would close all my accounts and find another bank.
  18. Like
    rekbender reacted to Dodgeb4ya in Those that do interiors   
    Pfaff and Consew user  here....most important is setting the properly serviced machine up for your sitting height for good treadle control.
    Yes they are sensitive but if the women in factories can run them so can us pansy ass men!
    There is a servo motor kit for those who cannot man up.
    Read, learn, watch video's and practice.... a lot. Go slow and easy ...you can do it!

  19. Like
    rekbender reacted to Dodgeb4ya in Oil Pans Types   
    My 51 Plymouth has baffles, my 53 Savoy did not.... my 52 Dodge had baffles.
    I have not seen baffles in the B series 1/2 thru 1 tons.
    Here is a factory picture out of the 1949-52 Dodge shop manual showing a baffled  oil pan.

  20. Like
    rekbender got a reaction from Conn47D24 in Chain case cover plate gasket   
    The oil pan has to come off to remove the engine mount plate as there is a bolt that goes in from behind.  This bolt goes through the aluminum oil pan plate that bolts to the bottom of the block in front of the front main bearing cap and actually threads into the motor mount plate. Before you remove this plate, mark the bolts still holding the plate after the timing chain cover is removed. The cam timing gear has to come off too. Don't forget to remove the flat head screw next to the locating dowel pin. While the motor mount plate is off, replace the core plug behind it in the block. To re-assemble, I would glue the plate gasket to the plate first with Copper Coat, or gasket sealer so it's firmly attached, then apply sealer to the block side of the gasket.  I'd put some extra silicone around the bottom where the motor mount plate bolts to the oil pan gasket plate. As I remember, there a three bolts that enter the water jacket so teflon tape these threads. I'd would take pictures at each step of the dis-assemblly and keep notes just to avoid aggravation. It's not really bad at all.
     




  21. Like
    rekbender reacted to Merle Coggins in Water pump removal - engine drain cock   
    Your block may be full of crud. Try removing the block petcock fully. If nothing comes out after that you'll have to poke around through the crud until coolant flows. And if there is a lot you may want to remove the core plugs and flush out the block.
  22. Like
    rekbender reacted to greg g in What is the limiting factor on mopar flathead rpm?   
    Why build a race engine for the street??? Factory peak hp was pulled at 3600, it falls off after that.  My machine shop guy suggested 10% over that was safe and a bit meaningful, over that was just more noise.  Also suggested 80/85 % of 3600 was a safe cruise all day speed assuming good engine condition and proper oil pressure. So rather than build for a peak rpm, why not build to usable street able range.  These are torque engines not hp engines.  Torque gets you going, hp keeps you going...  My slightly modified 230, accelerates fairly briskly, has plenty of power to pass and climb hills, and cruises nicely at 65 with overdrive and gets 20+ mpg in the bargain. Personally there isn't much more I require of a 72 year old car.  
  23. Like
    rekbender reacted to sser2 in What is the limiting factor on mopar flathead rpm?   
    High reciprocating mass (pistons and upper parts of connecting rods) combined with long stroke. These conditions create high inertial forces that put strain on rod bearings. Forces at rod bearings are proportionate to square of rotational speed, so at 4,000 rpm the load on rod bearings is 4 times that at 2,000 rpm. Excessive force squeezes out oil film, leading to bearing failure.
     
    Modern engines can run at higher speeds because they use lighter pistons and rods, and because they are generally short stroke.
  24. Like
    rekbender got a reaction from sser2 in 230 dodge w/Edgy aluminum head, problems   
    The problem may be the wrong thermostat.  The thermostat housing in the picture is a by-pass housing like the ones used on earlier blocks without the internal bypass. I've seen three different designs for these housings and each requires a unique thermostat (the old bellows type that don't work in a pressurized system) to block the by-pass passage in the front of the housing when the engine is warm and the thermostat open. If the by-pass passage isn't blocked, too much coolant by-passes the radiator and just circulates within the block. A later housing made for a wax pellet type thermostat may cure the problem. I ran into this  a while back and it drove me nuts until I figured it out. If the housing in the picture is a P18 type, Stant makes a thermostat/adapter package that will work  correctly in the P18 housing. Hope this  helps.

  25. Like
    rekbender got a reaction from sser2 in 230 dodge w/Edgy aluminum head, problems   
    The problem may be the wrong thermostat.  The thermostat housing in the picture is a by-pass housing like the ones used on earlier blocks without the internal bypass. I've seen three different designs for these housings and each requires a unique thermostat (the old bellows type that don't work in a pressurized system) to block the by-pass passage in the front of the housing when the engine is warm and the thermostat open. If the by-pass passage isn't blocked, too much coolant by-passes the radiator and just circulates within the block. A later housing made for a wax pellet type thermostat may cure the problem. I ran into this  a while back and it drove me nuts until I figured it out. If the housing in the picture is a P18 type, Stant makes a thermostat/adapter package that will work  correctly in the P18 housing. Hope this  helps.

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