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'41 Fat Bottom Girl

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About '41 Fat Bottom Girl

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • My Project Cars
    1941 Dodge D19 Business Coupe, 1969 Corvette Stingray

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  • Biography
    Built and worked on motorcycles and cars, mechanically, body work and paint. Rock & Blues musician.
  • Occupation
    Retired Mechanical Engineer

Converted

  • Location
    Queen Creek, Arizona
  • Interests
    Working on cars, Play drums, songwriter, record music

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89 profile views
  1. Super- That sure sounds like the way to go. Excellent write-up explaining what you did, and your findings certainly give credence to the oil separator addition. I am looking forward to making the changes. Thanx very much for taking the time to detail your set-up and the results. Great stuff!
  2. "The Oil Soup"- what a great handle! I had to chuckle... From the threads (thanx again, Plymouthy Adams) when I do my PCV valve setup: I will go from a hose fitting on a non-vented oil filler cap on the filler tube to a brazed fitting at the bottom of my oil bath air filter- giving me filtered air to the filler tube. Then will do a setup similar to Adam H P15 D30 with a vertically oriented stubbed-out downdraft tube with a hose fitting. Will go from that to a PCV valve and then into the intake manifold. What I am going to try in addition to these setups as described in the threads is an oil separator immediately before the PCV valve inlet. Per Steeda (tm): They Connect to the PCV hose to prevent oil and crankcase vapors from getting into the intake manifold and decreasing your fuel octane. They are fully sealed to ensure no vacuum leaks, and are simple to service. They hold up to three ounces of fluid for service intervals lapsing each oil change. Includes hardware for installation. Steeda's oil separator kits reduce detonation, oil burning and deposits on the valves by removing oil drawn through the PCV system before it can contaminate the intake charge. This is why I was interested to try one. Hoping to limit oil/vapors getting into the intake, cleaner smell while running, and side benefit of no visible downdraft tube blow-by. So then I would have a "closed" PCV system with the possible advantage of a separator to trap unwanted oil into my intake. Looking at doing my rebuild later this summer on my 80k miles flathead 6, and if I find any interesting results (positive or negative) using a separator I will post them. Maybe somebody in the forum has tried one already, but I didn't find it in the threads I found.
  3. Hi 40plyguy, I'm pretty new to the forum myself...Per Plymouthy Adam's suggestions, I tried related words and had success. I found if I went to "downloads" and entered "crankcase " in the search window, I found threads about adding PCV valves (mixed in with other crankcase stuff, but I did find PCV info going through those pages). Haven't looked for info converting to a T5 tranny though... Good Luck!
  4. I don't know if this is the right way to do this (still learning about the forum), but I thought it would be of interest to start a new topic about PCV valves. These are excerpts from a previous subject "Old Flatheads and Today's Gas". My thanx to James_Douglas and Adam H for raising the topic, I didn't find anything on previous threads and I am really curious if anyone has recommendations... Comment from James_Douglas 7. I just set up a PCV after running the new engine for 15 years and 60K miles. The oil stays cleaner longer and there is no visible blow by at stop signs! Question from Adam H P15 D30 James - Do you have a picture of your PCV set up? I found mine sucks a little oil on long decels. My engine is fairly fresh with good compression, I am probably going back to the draft tube.... Questions/ comments from me: I was thinking of getting rid of my draft tube also when I do my rebuild. I anticipate some oil in my future PCV tube because of the usual minor drip I had from the crankcase down tube with past and current flatheads. Always seem to have a bit of blow-by no matter the engine condition. I was thinking of fitting a crankcase filter screen (Dorman #47064 and Motorcraft FA1068 are a couple available) between the draft tube (stubbed out raised up in vertical position as Adam has in his photo) and the PCV valve. To contain the filter in some sort of housing I would have to get creative with a piece of suitable I.D. rubber tubing and fittings both ends to attach PCV hose, or do something like that. Another thought I had was an oil separator (Steeda makes one for Mustangs I was thinking of) and put it in the line between the PCV valve and carb base. I suppose the possible advantage with that is it visible whereas thescreen at the draft tube would not (for maintenance?) I will have to look on this forum to see if there are any posts on the subject. If not, maybe some of the members have had some preventative fixes. Interesting you brought that up! Great stuff...
  5. I was thinking of getting rid of my draft tube also when I do my rebuild. I anticipate some oil in my future PCV tube because of the usual minor drip I had from the crankcase down tube with past and current flatheads. Always seem to have a bit of blow-by no matter the engine condition. I was thinking of fitting a crankcase filter screen (Dorman #47064 and Motorcraft FA1068 are a couple available) between the draft tube (stubbed out raised up in vertical position as Adam has in his photo) and the PCV valve. To contain the filter in some sort of housing I would have to get creative with a piece of suitable I.D. rubber tubing and fittings both ends to attach PCV hose, or do something like that. Another thought I had was an oil separator (Steeda makes one for Mustangs I was thinking of) and put it in the line between the PCV valve and carb base. I suppose the possible advantage with that is it visible whereas the screen at the draft tube would not (for maintenance?) I will have to look on this forum to see if there are any posts on the subject. If not, maybe some of the members have had some preventative fixes. Interesting you brought that up! Great stuff...
  6. Good info on ethanol and rubber. Didn't have to consider ethanol back in the day. Don't want a car-b-q. Will be careful on rubber. Great advice from all and I sure am going to appreciate those build threads. Sure will help me on my flathead 6. Rebuilt a couple flathead 8's back in the 70's and a couple OHC motors after, but this 6 is a new one for me. Thebeebe5? great tip on your thread re the outfit in Phoenix- to get the block cleaned out if I run into difficulty getting the water passages sludge and caking out. They're not that far from me here outside of Queen Creek. BTW, your '37 looks really cool. Thanx, all!
  7. If seats look in really good condition and no burns or pits, would I just lap them, or is it best to have them replaced? Thanx, all...
  8. In my upcoming rebuild of my flathead 6 (217.8) I was thinking I should at least go with hardened exhaust valve seats. A few questions: -Anything else should I do in the rebuild considering today's gas? Up to this point I have been using gas additives- a lead substitute, and Seafoam, and adding some Magic Mystery Oil to the current 30W non-detergent oil I use. I will probably change to a detergent oil after rebuild. -Is there a recommended oil weight? I am in the Phoenix AZ area, so no freezing temps- just hot in the summertime, so multigrade not really necessary (?) -Should I continue to use any gas additives after rebuild? -Octane rating- 87 good? Any advantage to higher rating considering these are a low compression engine? Regarding compression- Mill the head .040 to .060 for a bit more? Thanx much!
  9. Thanx for the pix, everybody. Great food for thought. My rims, paint & seats aren't original, so what the heck- I sure do like the silver and red combo! Beautiful engine compartment, Cold Blue. Bronze and silver is cool too...decisions, decisions, decisions...
  10. Just goes to show you we all have different experiences, for sure. I have always maintained that the measure of a man, or an organization, is not in the mistakes they make, it is how they address a problem. It is unfortunate we have all had too many bad experiences with different companies these days as we lose the personal care and considerations in our society.
  11. Great! Nuthin' like a picture to tell the story...Thanx, guys!
  12. FYI- This is just my personal experience for what it's worth (2 Cents?). In case you decide to bite the bullet and decide to buy present day repro parts.... In '97 I bought some interior and exterior rubber parts from A Bernbaum and wasn't too happy with the appearance- some weld lines on some, flash and some surface imperfections. I have to be fair, that was a long time ago and maybe they have some new molding vendors since then, and I may have had an experience that they have since corrected. I have had good luck with a lot of other AB parts and I still buy from them, otherwise they have been good. But. In '98, a club friend told me to try Steel Rubber Products and I have bought all my rubber from them since - and I have bought a lot of parts. Steele is also pricey, but I never had a single problem with either fit or appearance or premature aging as the years go by. I looked for alternatives for my quarters too, but found no other solution. Gritted my teeth, pulled out the old credit card and bought 'em from Steele. They did work out great. No wind noise, no water leaks. In retrospect it was worth it. Good luck!
  13. When I rebuild my flathead 6- What was the original color for the engine? I don't need to have an exact color, just to know if it was green or tan, or other- Just don't want to do something like Chevy orange (nuttin' against Chevys, but I like this car being old Mopar!) Motorheads Forever!
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