55 Fargo Spitfire

Member with a blog
  • Content count

    9,458
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    17

Everything posted by 55 Fargo Spitfire

  1. Park on a steep hill, and leave truck in gear, do not apply parking brake and get out of the truck you will find out quickly. no don't try this it could result in injury or damage to the truck, just kidding. All of the above posts will confirm your question...........
  2. Yes these Industrial 265s are rated at approximately 7:1 compression ratio, the design and specs for a Combine or what have you. But again no replacement for displacement, and mine is already a 270 ci, 200 hp, well doable, even a stock build with a raised compression ratio and 1 carb and single exhaust could yield 130-140 hp. Add in 2 or 3 carb intakes, split exhaust and a different cam and even more compression, well 200 is within its range. I don't know if my build will be 200hp, but it will be much better than 100 hp, and plenty enough power to push my Fargo around and look good and sound good at the same time.... Got yah
  3. Does anyone happen to know specs for the 265 Chrysler Industrial Engines, mine is a 1960s version used in a Massey Combine. I am looking for Torque, HP and Compression ratio ratings. I have found limited info both on this website as well as Google searching. It is reputed that these engines have lower compression than the car and truck 265s, as well as less HP and torque specs at a lower RPM, which is a cam duration and lift difference for these engines. I do not have a manual, and cannot get any specs so far. Those who want to know why I am concerned with this, reasons are , prior to building or using this engine want to know what I am starting with. The combustion chamber in the head, are huge and a 1/2 inch deep.........
  4. There is at least 1 47 Chrysler there right now apparently. The interlake is a treasure trove of old flathead powered stuff, but scrap is getting high priced again, so lots will be hauled....
  5. Apparently late 50s big truck 265 head is the way to go. The spitfire head might work too, once cut... The Oliver, like the Cockshutt and Massey were rated at 93 hp, this has to be because of the heads used and lower duration and shorter lift cams. Designed for max grunt work at a lower rpm, I am thinking.
  6. As far as the slant 6 distributor conversion, is concerned, You can buy aftermarket Modules including the use of a GM HEI if you like the distributor itself is pretty rugged. Lots love the Pertronix, including a few of my local friends, and lots hate em, I am neutral, and still use points, even though I built a slat 6 dizzy, keeping that for another project... what are you running a Langdon GM conversion
  7. I did not say used lifters, I stated stock OEM tappets, and if they are in excellent condition only. Frank was referring to a different size or type of tappets, at least that's what I thought he meant. It was never stated that I was using the same tappets if in poor condition, used new or NOS otherwise. So not sure how you deduced that, but not a problem, will most likely be using new tappets if warrranted, and perhaps I am more of a risk taker than you. Too bad you are so far away, once this engine is built have no problem going at it pedal to the metal against you on the wide open highway................LOL
  8. Listen, you do not need that Pertronix piece of work, but sure a divisive camp of people who have used them, some love em and lots hate em. Here is a real simple mod, you use a slant six distributor and eci, heck you can use the GM HEI module with it if you like. It involves taking the slant 6 dizzy apart, and using the chrysler flathe head 6 distributor shaft assembly, I have done it, not overly hard, and works great. But I have no issues with points either, and if you need a distributor, Manitoba has lots of them around yet.
  9. Thank you
  10. Nope your wrong or misinformed, change cam and hub, and tappets are the same...........
  11. Here are pics of the head and combustion chambers, 1 is the 265 Industrial and the other a 1960 Canadian 250.
  12. Nope, tappets are not different, no govenors, and regular intake being a down draft. combines ran a little higher in the RPM band. But agree fully this cam and the head are built for comfort not speed......
  13. Well thank you, no it's not a Jasper engine. Its right out of a Massey Super 92 combine a 1961, it's a 265, and was rebuilt by "Piston Ring" in Winnipeg, in it's heyday they were rebuilding over 3000 engines per year. Chrysler flathead 6s were a staple item on there floor. Its rated at 93 hp on a Massey or Oliver combine, not sure what is different, has to be the head and cam, can't be anything else...
  14. A little more digging and found this engine rated, on Massey and Oliver combines at 93 hp and 211 ft lb of torque at 1450 rpm for peak torque. Compression ratio 6.8: 1, cam profile, not found, most likely low lift shorter duration compared to a truck or car engine. Than again guys for the help, 15 views and I answered my own question..............
  15. Hi all, 55 Fargo, hauled the rubbish to the dump, then get a free load of vinyl siding and old telephone pole pieces. Let's here from those who used their trucks to do what they were intended to do, and thats "Work"...
  16. Hey once those valves are cleaned aup, here is my engine, it most likely will need boring and new pistons and rings, valve grind possibly. I am very tempted to run it as is on the floor and see what it does. Your engine with a valve job, might be good for a while.
  17. Here is mine on a 108 inch WB 1/2 Ton,
  18. First chance you get, do a Cylinder Leak Down Test, and see how much your cyls are leaking and from where. No point in just pulling the head and doing valves if the rings are leaking bad. My engine has similar compression numbers, but does not burn oil or smoke, oil pressure is very good too. My cylinder leak down test pointed to rings and blowby, if I had relied strictly on a compression test, it indicated leaking valves. You might as well know what your up against before you make the plan...... Running the engine with a "vacuum" gauge hooked up can ell you a few things too. actually you could have a reading of 17 or 18 inches, with a slight quiver, indicating a few valves not sealing 100%. If the gauge is vacillating like crazy, of course a valve could be burnt or sticking. The Cylinder leak down test is a very good diagnosis, other than taking the engine out and apart for a visual inspection and measurements.
  19. Its amazing how these engines keep running even in "wounded and worn condition",. Here is the 265 engine I just bought, sat for 30 years, was rebuilt once, got a little moisture in cylinder 6 so a small spot of rust in the top of the cylinder. The lifter chamber was super clean, the oil pan had a tiny bit of sludge, and the brass water tube pulled out easy and is clean as a whistle. I have not deciced if it will get rebored and new pistons and rings, or measure things and hone with new rings. It was rebuilt by Piston Ring pistons .040, rods .010 and mains .020, and was run a few seasons in a combine. Its a Chrysler Industrial 265 bored to 270.
  20. Drain the system, add a 1/2 cup of Electrosol and pure water into your cooling system, go for an hours drive, get the system good and hot, drain this out, add water run again drain and flush it should be clean now. If it isn't pull water pump, and pull water tube clean and inspect, those should be done with pulling the "welch plugs", and rodding out any debris and cruddy rust. BTW these are not freeze or frost plugs and were never designed as such. They are core plugs or welch plugs.... BTW here is the water tube from y 265 engine I am working on, it was easy to take out and clean as a whistle a good indicator of a clean cooling system. I am building a hi-perf high HP engine
  21. Oil

    Okay well they pump, they do not necessarily keep flowing without occasionally slowing or stopping, the needle valve and float help regulate the process otherwise, you might have fuel blowing out of the carb...
  22. Oil

    have to check em tomorrow and let you know...
  23. Oil

    Okay, here is the deal, you need to go through and verify all ignition, meaning spark plugs all the same NGKs or ACs, autolite, good high tension leads, points condenser, rotor, cap, coil, and ballast if necessary. Does your distributor not have a vacuum advance? how are the wipers operated? Next all fuel, which sounds like you covered. Set this up, tune and see what you have. Have you done a compression test yet? BTW I have 1955 dodge 1 ton truck rims here, 5 of them and a diff and frame and some other junk...
  24. button her up and drive, how well did she run before the bent valve incident? This engine once rebuilt again should put out some nice torque......
  25. Oil

    If you are running 12 volts, you either need a coil with built in resistor, or the type which requires an external ballast resistor, as simple as that. What kinda shape is the carb in?