Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 08/24/2016 in all areas

  1. 16 likes
    Some of you are connected to me on Facebook, and have seen the pictures, but the back story I want to share here might be of interest. Last week I followed a lead that took me to a house about 19 miles northwest of me where I found another P15c Plymouth patiently waiting for resurrection. The car, a nice example of loving care over its 70 years of existence, is now in my garage and has become the second in my permanent collection. In the past 6 months I've bought two other P15's but that I was tempted to keep, but they've since taken a boat trip to Holland where my business partner will find decent homes for them. The newest acquisition is a convertible. I've yet to have the documentation pulled from the archive, but the car is believed to have been sold in Massachusetts originally. I am very anxious to see which dealer and to be able to see if the building still exists. The original owner was from Lexington Massachusetts, as shown on one of the 30 or so registration cards that came in the glove box. He was a Doctor of Physics and worked at a small institution known as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lincoln Labs. Some may recognize the name of this establishment as being home of a small project code named "Manhattan". While unconfirmed as of yet, there is an endowment left in the owners name and I have written to enquire if this learned individual was indeed connected to Atomic research going on at the time. This gentlemen kept the car for many years, and I suspect the last year of ownership was 1964 which is documented in a Midas Muffler lifetime warrantee also delivered with the car. The glove box was filled with maps of the eastern seaboard and a list of antique shops in each state. Researching his name I found that this man and his wife amassed one of the countries largest collections of Shaker furniture, a portion of which was sold after his death and another portion donated to the Smithsonian in DC. Further research has shown me that the man died at the ripe age of 94, leaving a sizeable chunk of money to create an endowment that reports assets over $1mil today. The second owner of the car is another local gentlemen who owned the car from 1964/5 up until 2001. This gentleman is still alive and well and living in Concord Massachusetts. He started a small business in the 1960's that has now grown into one of New England's largest Asphalt paving contractors and does a lot of private and highway paving work in the region. This man was the last to drive the car up until this past weekend. The car was last on the road (legally) in 1980. In the trunk of the car were many treasures, one of which I was told should always stay in the car. Under a small blanket were a dozen small flat stones about 2" in diameter. The second owner stated he and his wife collected these stones on their first date in Wells Beach Maine. Coincidently my family has owned a home in Wells Beach since 1919, which makes the tie to this car and the story a little sweeter. Amazingly enough the car has never been titled as they were not required or needed during the use of the car with its first two owners. I will likely title the car due to its value and estate reasons, and will become the first titled owner. The fella I bought the car from almost backed out of the deal, having owned the car since 2001, he had ideas of restoring it, but I am glad he left it alone. Among other items in the car were three spare hubcaps, a set of spare leaf spring shackles new in their NOS boxes, an original cloth bag for the bumper jack equipment, a wooden hand screwdriver which I believe may have been Plymouth OE, five brand new pairs of windshield wipers, a dozen spare vacuum radio tubes, and a couple boxes of spare fuses. A few sentences about the condition of the car as found, what I've done in the past week, and what I plan to do; General condition; - The car has not run since 1980 after the keys were lost, but the motor turned by hand so I knew there had to be some life in it. - The motor has a reman tag on it, a sticker on the firewall and yellow grease pencil writing on the firewall indicating it was replaced at 99,257 miles. The car now has 27,175 miles, so relatively new considering. Inspection thru the #6 cylinder port has proven the motor is a 230. (big smiles on my face when I learned that). - The body has two small issues to correct, but I likely won't touch them for several years as the patina is very appealing to me. One area on the front edge of the passenger door, and another paint separation issue surrounding the rear stop light on the trunk. The rest of the car is undercoated (rather thickly too) as well as under the hood. - Braking is terrible at the moment despite replacing the right front lower cylinder to make it yard drivable. Brake fluid is orange proving that what ever is in the tubes is long overdue for replacement. - The interior is trimmed rather smartly in - The top is original to the car and has a HUGE hole in it above the front seat. Mechanism goes up and down by hand easily. Vacuum cylinders are as of yet undiagnosed. - The car came with a factory supplied boot cover that is in decent shape. I will attempt to use this for the moment and in the future have a new one sewn up from its pattern. - The car also came with a rather unique and suspected non-oem option: Full Custom Tonneau Cockpit Cover. At first I said to myself what a shame, then I saw it on the car and fell in love with it. Getting her running; - Drained the 37 year old gas, boy does that stink... now to find a place to get rid of 10 gallons of it. - Replaced a very worn fan belt. - Swapped out the ignition switch for an OEM that I had in my stash. - Swapped out plugs, cables, coil. - Replaced both battery leads with heavy gauge OE style. - Added some MMO to each cylinder, placed the car in gear and rolled her back and forth a few times. - Installed a new 6V battery. - Disconnected the gas line to the carb and hand fed her some gasoline whereupon after several minutes of cranking she jumped to life. (and shot out an dust pan full of mouse crap, acorns and dirt from the muffler all over the garage floor.) She ran fine for an hour then died rather abruptly, whereupon several hours of playing whack-a-mole with intermittent doses of ATF has resulted in some less-sticky valves. Latest suggestion was to run some lead additive and to pull the gas tank and clean it. Plans to get her roadworthy; - Remove the gas tank, and thoroughly clean it. Looking for suggestions as to what might be best to use to clean the inside of the tank, noting that it has been wet with gas so residue is assumed to be fairly motile. - New brake cylinders, new brake lines, new MC, new brake switch, all four corners and in between. Curious as to whether or not I will need the miller brake tool (or reasonable facsimile) since I will be using the shoes/pads that are on the car as they are nearly in new condition. Any opinions here? - New top on order from Bill Hirsch to match the original factory colors; Black on tan, (my irish blood appreciates this a lot). Local trimmer has been selected and reports having done two 40's mopars in recent months. (they are on my hit list for names and addresses...) - Fluid changes - ALL of them, including oil, coolant, gear box, and rear end. During the winter months; - Interior betterments. Haven't decided if I want to rescue the interior or go new. I am partial to the patina, but if the cost would be too much to repair it may make sense to spend some dough on new correct color leather. The leather is in decent shape with no holes, but the cotton stitching has disintegrated on the front seat. - Passenger side vent wing window has a broken pivot point and the threaded post that attaches it to the doors A-pillar is sheared off. Both will need to be repaired. Glass will need to be removed from the frame before it can be corrected. Working on glass will be a first for me, and with such a rare part, I will have to work myself up to the challenge. - Overdrive swap. Later this year I will haul the sedan down to our house in North Carolina and park for a few years storage until we begin to full time in the winters down there. Before she goes down I will likely pull the OD and replace shelve it for installation in the convertible. And before I end this, a few notes of thanks for guidance in recent days; - Robin Weathersbee for his enthusiastic support and un-ending archives. - Greg G for giving me his phone number 7 or 8 years ago and allowing me to ask random questions in the middle of any given day or evening. - Young Ed is always there with his matter of fact - Bob Toft for sending me a dozen emails and a bunch of pictures of his car which convinced me to open the safe. I'll be a pest to all you for a while - bear with me. - lastly to my wife, to whom endured the "surprise look what I bought!" without sending a waffle iron flying in the air towards my head. And to her credit has instructed me to hurry up and get it done summer is here! AND said why would you consider selling Ruby?! AND doesn't understand why a 70 year old car is so special but allows me to spend every waking non-wage earning hour with it.
  2. 14 likes
    Who says a flathead 6 can't beat a hellcat. Did it today
  3. 14 likes
    I just wanted to say I'm sorry to the guys who have been trying to get parts form me this last year....I've been pulled from so many different directions and have had a few life changes at home. Before as a single man (a widower actually) I was able to drown myself in everything Dodge related, stay up really late and sleep in on my days off.....for years!!!!!! Since getting married, to a super fantastic woman who took the time to restore me, It seems like I have been reinventing myself. In a good way of course. But that has come with a few sacrifices, and hopefully I'll be able to play with my spare parts soon. After months of work, we finally sold her house. It was a huge undertaking involving several remolding projects and repair work, but it paid off. That of course led to a dream of mine to own a building in town (clements, ca) to have a business that deals with vehicles. She has embraced that dream too, and now we own a building I've had my eye on since 2009. It took some fancy foot work to get from point A to point B.....but all that paperwork, phone calling, meetings, more paperwork, sweating, more phone calling......etc. again, it paid off. We now own that building!! Today will be our first day with the keys. Its been a new beginning for me since the first time I laid eyes on my wife and I feel very, very fortunate! Digging through the yard parts, pulling suff that guys really need, is a lot of fun work......soon I will be back doing that, but right now I'm enjoying the changes in my life and hope it keeps going. After working more than 30 years for "the man"....it will be fun trying out the other side of the desk...lol. It will be a slow transition from my current job, but I'm looking forward to the adventure. 48D
  4. 13 likes
    Our local volunteer fire department has an annual car show. I missed it last year, but I was able to take my B-4-B to it this year (won Best Original Truck class). I am not into the trophies, but I was on Cloud 9 when the man I bought the truck from 42 years ago stopped by the truck to visit for a couple of hours. I had tried to buy the truck (parked, bed off, not running for at least 5 years) from his father - the original owner (Gilbert Toepfer - pronounced "Teffer"), but he would not sell. When Mr. Toepfer passed away, his son Marvin called my folks and asked if I wanted to buy the truck from his dad's estate - $100 back in 1975. Marvin is on the right, I am the one in need of a wide-angle lens on the left. He is now 81 yrs young and still quite sharp. We talked all things "old Dodge truck" and our hometown. It made his day as much as it did my son's and mine. Marvin told me that he never remembered the truck looking this nice since it was always a work truck. Because of its work status, he's pretty sure that no "back in the day" photos exist of it (but he will look). BTW, the man in the lawn chair on the left was showing his 1971 Barracuda (not a 'Cuda) convertible. He is the original owner. He joked that my truck was bringing the folks in, then they would look at his Barracuda to be polite. His car actually took top place at the show.
  5. 13 likes
    Loving my Truck. Just need to try and get a bit more speed out of her. Getting about 40 mph. 360 Flathead 4 speed. Don't believe you can buy ring and pinions for these anymore can ya. Maybe a 5 speed transplant is in need, would take care of the no syncro tranny also. Anyways sorry for rambling I just wanted to share my truck with the group. Have a great weekend! Scott
  6. 13 likes
    With no radio, no windshield wipers, no phone I decided to visit my cousin in Cloverdale, California. It took me 10 hours to get from Southern California to the San Francisco bay area. Next day 3 hours to get to Cloverdale. It was about 1156 miles (round trip). I'm going to figure out how much gas I used and see what my mileage was. The car drove like a champ. I don't like driving at night because I don't have dash lights - I don't have dash lights because I don't drive at night. Going across the Golden Gate bridge gave me chills. It was 1948, I was lost in dreams. At my cousins he took apart my WS wiper motor (and told me it's not a motor but we couldn't figure out what to call it). I am going to have wind shield wipers. I don't want to make a novel out of this but just wanted to say all the money I've put into that silly car was worth it.
  7. 12 likes
    My baby. This is Fiddy. I had a 2005 Harley FatBoy, her name was Fatty.
  8. 11 likes
    Today my Grandson came over and we spent the afternoon working on my P-15. With my guidance he is a pretty good wrench spinner. Unfortunately my arthritic hands make it almost impossible for me to hold on to a wrench without dropping it. After a couple of hours we ran the engine. Problem with the number 2 carburetor but it should be an easy fix. Grandson turns 15 this coming weekend and gets his learners permit.
  9. 11 likes
  10. 11 likes
    Hello comrades; I decided to write down this story, as may it be not known in US, but when production of Chrysler 6 ended? And what was the last car using it? You'd probably say, that in 70s and it was used in trucks. That's truth, but not all the truth. To understand it well, we have to go back to Soviet Union to early 40s. As You may know, in GAZ (Gorkovskij Avtomobilnyj Zavod- Car Factory in Gorki) at this time GAZ A and GAZ M1 were produced, first one being license of Ford A, second- 1934 Ford with Ford A engine. As it became outdated by early 40s, they decided to design new car, but well, after 22 June, 1941 they had more important problems, such as "how to make paint on tanks dry faster". As the situation on front get better, in 1943 idea of a new car came back. They copied front suspension from Opel Kapitan (GM), took some minor parts from Ford, copied Chrysler's engine, but changing all diameters from imperial to metrical system, so most parts, such as pistons and bushing are not interchangeable. All these parts were put in modern uni-body and that's how GAZ M20 Pobeda (Victory) was born. Car was shown to Stalin, he was quite satisfied, but, well... "... 6 cylinder? Passenger cars should be more economical, fuel is more needed for the army!" As arguing with uncle Jossif would probably end with government-sponsored 15 year vacation in luxury resort in Kolyma, with such attractions as a uranium mine or cutting down forest, engineers decided to cut engine and change it into 4 cylinder one. That's how GAZ M-20 engine emerged. Production of GAZ M-20 started in 1945. Of course, 6 was also produced, but it was used in trucks (GAZ 51), army vehicles and special Pobiedas, made exclusively for KGB. In late 40s/early 50s, license for Pobeda was given as a Stalin's present for Poland. Production started in 1951 in FSO in Warsaw (Fabryka Samochodów Osobowych, Factory of Passenger Cars- so romantic name!). Car was named "FSO M20 Warszawa" Production of Pobeda ended in 1958, of Warszawa- in 1973. Engine was also used in GAZ 69, something in kind of Soviet Jeep. But... In late 50s, in FSC (Fabryka Samochodów Ciężarowych, Factory of Trucks) in Lublin and ZSD (Zakład Samochodów Dostawczych; Facility of Delivery Cars) in Nysa, Poland, using all mechanics of M20 Warszawa two delivery cars were built. Żuk (Beetle) and Nysa But, that's not the end of a story... In middle 60s FSO found out, that 45 HP flathead 4 with fuel consumption around 14 L/100 km is not a modern powertrain. Money were on shortage, so instead of developing new engine, old flathead was re-designed, and became... OHV. "Down" of the engine, pistons, crankshaft, oiling system etc. was untouched, "Top" was new. And... S-21 engine emerged. Also, a 40s fastback wasn't the most modern body style in early 60s(well... they could wait 5 years, it would be fashionable again) and the funds was as always, on shortage, the biggest change in Warszawa production run occured- it became a sedan, called 223 (with S-21 engine) and 224 (with flathead) Production of that car without any major changes ended in 1973. But, production of deliveries not. Nysa got new body in late 60s, Żuk got face-lifting in early 70s. After end of production of Warszawa, Żuk and Nysa started using OHV. Production of Nysa ended in 1994, of Żuk- in 1997, but in 1993 it (FINALLY!) got diesel, and the story of Chrysler flathead 6, which became OHV 4, ended. Joke. In 1958, in Only True Korea GAZ 51 was copied... and it's still in production, with good old Flathead 6. And it was face-lifted recently! (in 2008... 10 years ago... let's say that it was recently) So, always when You see old Mopar flathead 6, remember about his 4-cylinder little brother in Poland which carries vegetables to the market or about big brother in North Korea, which caries... probably army. Is it anything else in North Korea? PS. You'll probably found out, that I'm not an English-speaker, so it would be great if someone correct or re-write this article. PS2: If You ever wondered, what was the first SUV, it's not Jeep Wagoneer. It's GAZ M-72.
  11. 11 likes
    I got vinyl lettering for Dolly's sign.. When I was in High School I had a wood headboard with the same sign.
  12. 11 likes
    I found a NOS d24 clock on e-bay but it was priced over $500 dollars! I decided to remove the clock and install a quartz movement which cost less than ten dollars. A slight modification with a cut off to make room for the Quartz movement and put the clock back in the car. The double A battery should last a year or more and the clock is accurate with in a few seconds a year.
  13. 10 likes
    A few pics from this evening's cruise. These darn cars make me eat so much ice cream. I wonder how many cones have been eaten in this car over the past 64 years? I was experimenting with my iPhone tonight taking some pics. You can get some groovy distorted looking images. Lots of fanatical waves and thumbs up tonight during my cruise route. I stopped for gas and a guy approached and said he loved the car. Could he take a few pictures? Of course, I replied. Thank you. I took her up several good hills tonight. Testing her for speed and watching the temp gauge. I hit my local hill in 3rd, pulled hard, shifted into 4th and pushed on up, hitting 50 MH. Speed limit was 30 MPH so I did not go any faster. She ran great. Great cars these old Chryslers.
  14. 10 likes
    So far sooooooooo good ! She's back together now and running surprisingly strong. The throttle response is lightning fast and the engine pulls harder than the 251 in my old Yellow truck. I am happy happy happy !!! I'm going to drive it for a couple days and then check the compression on all cylinders.
  15. 10 likes
    From this mornings home town parade.Happy Independent Day to all!
  16. 10 likes
    My first hobby is photography. My son, Jacob, decided at age 14 that he wanted 'an old car' when it came time to drive. I searched around and found this 1950 P20 Special DeLuxe Club Coupe that had been restored two owners ago. The previous owner bought it from the prior's estate. The PO had the bumpers rechromed, found some trim, redid steering tie rods, and a few other things. I've primarily just been doing maintenance, but Jacob is starting a Scarebird Disc Brake install real soon. I don't know why I haven't taken the time to take a photo of the car -- perhaps all the time my wife's kitchen remodel is taking? That project started at the same time we got the Plymouth -- hmm. Anyway, yesterday, 4 July 2017, I finished repairing the parking brake and then asked my youngest daughter to put on a dress and we headed out to take some photos. I started at local college campus but got run off by security. Headed to a park that has an ancient stone gazebo, but being a national holiday, the park was overrun with people. Decided I would head down to this pull off across the river as it has a place without any time telling details. Favorite shot of the youngest daughter with the Plymouth.
  17. 10 likes
    This is an old farm truck I pulled out of a fence row in Colorado. An afternoon with a hose, soap, and some Mother's cleaner wax got me here.
  18. 10 likes
  19. 10 likes
    I have several classics and am a member of forums for each of them. In some cases more than one. I must say by far this site is the best. It has the typical curmudgeons but even those are nowhere as bad as some of the other sites I use. My goal when visiting a site is to obtain information that will help me get/keep my vehicals going while when I can, help others do the same. As one of those Chrysler people who have crashed this site, I am thankful that most here don't mind and are willing to assist because I have yet to find an exclusive site to my old Windsor that is as good as this one and that has the volume of activity. As an example, I also have a '73 D100. There are a few sites that have sections for theses trucks but none that I can ask a question on in the middle of a job and get multiple answers in just a day. This is is a public site, be like a duck and let things roll of your back and be glad that there is a place you can turn to for help with 60+ year old cars and trucks. Without it many of the great cars I see photos of on here would be nothing but rusting hulks.
  20. 10 likes
    I'm going to be about 600 miles from my truck for the next week, so I won't be able to participate on the 'IWOYTD' this year. However I did do something good on Monday. I drove my blue 52 Desoto truck about 60 miles south to visit the original owner (Ernest) for his 100th birthday. He & I share the same birthday, but I'm 50 years younger! He was a little tired on the day so he didn't get to go for a ride around the block this time. He's still 'as sharp as a tack' in the mind, but his body is wearing out. He was my inspiration to keep the restoration of the 'Ernie' truck as original as possible. We did manage to snap a few cool pictures at an old church on the way home. Hope the attached photo inspires others in their MOPAR activities...
  21. 10 likes
    February 6 1932 my good friend and second Dad, the Grand Master of Flathead Mopars - George Asche was born. Yesterday was his surprise Birthday Party and today is George's 85th Birthday! The picture below is rumored to be when George Graduated High School, but I think really that should be a diploma of future Flathead Chrysler, Desoto, Plymouth, Dodge/Fargo's mastery ! In the background is his Dad's Dodge truck which George still owns today! Happy Birthday George! Oh and if your wondering what George was up to for Birthday. Well - Lunch with his Boys at the shop (George III, Rob and Tim), then building some carbs up, then over to the machine shop for some consulting as the AoK dual carb intakes were rolling through 7 different station. The picture of George with the prototype and the very first one to be completed which of course is his birthday present.. lol A few pictures of the Dual Carb (23 1/2" USA small block) and Triple Carb (25 1/2" Canadian Big Block) intakes going through the steps, and being test fitted on blocks setup with exhausts so that every intake has been checked for a perfect fit. Then it was off for Supper in Knox (Horse Thief Capital of the World) and back to George's shop and setting up tomorrows trip, which is believe it or not, were heading down to pick up George's Uncle Harry Hiens - #90 who is in the Nascar Hall of Fame. Harry lives in Mars PA. Were bringing him up to check out the AoK intakes and take George's newest 1929 Desoto for a ride!
  22. 10 likes
    Is it OK if I sneak this one in here? It's a pre-Mopar Dodge Brothers, and it's not a six cylinder... 27 DB
  23. 10 likes
    I wanted a hose clamp for the vacuum line on my old Plymouth. And I did not want it to be a modern screw style clamp. Looking around on the web I found a commercially manufactured tool that allow you to use wire to make hose clamps. But no store near me carries those tools (or a similar competitor). While it is possible to make your own tool, I really only need to do one small hose which is already a pretty good fit so does not need a lot of clamping force. So that was more work than I wanted to do. And then I found a write up on a way to do this using stuff I already had in the garage. I thought I'd pass it on.
  24. 9 likes
    The Local Council I work for recently cleaned out the records area. Amongst the old contract files were quotes for a new utility for the electricity department. Here's one for a DeSoto. Rick
  25. 9 likes
    after too many years, I finally got my shop built and got to pull the 53 out of the pile of crud that slowly enveloped it and put it in the new shop. My plans are to be driving this gal next summer.
  26. 9 likes
    ...that I got my car back to road. Want to say thank you for this great forum and the help of all posts while looking for information during restoration and the answered questions I ask. First 250 mls I drove and hope a lot more will be added... Andre
  27. 9 likes
    Making a old school looking fuel pressue gauge mount bracket for my 52 dodge PU...... nbeed to paint it and get it mounted next week....
  28. 9 likes
    Forgot the final pictures of the install....many thanks to my better half for the assist....lol 48D
  29. 9 likes
    Steve and I ran our Plymouths at The Vintage Nationals at Santa Pod (UK) today. It was great fun. Steve's coupe ran very strongly and took the honors with a best ET of 20.6 secs at 65 mph. My convertible ran 20.82 at 64.61mph. I'm pleased with that... until the next time! If you're on facebook here's a video of one of our heads up races... https://www.facebook.com/christopher.reynolds.5203/videos/10154763507078795/ If the video link doesn't work for you, here's a still...
  30. 9 likes
    A few years back my city slicker over protected granddaughter was at our place for a few days in the fall. Her grandma picked some green beans and ate them right in the garden. Our granddaughter couldn't believe grandma did not wash it first. Now she comes over and will pull out a carrot and wipe if off on her pants and eat it right in the garden. Another time I had her drive my utility tractor and she was to light so I put a jumper wire in the safety switch so she could drive it without the tractor shutting off. Her mom showed up and she had to show her how she could drive grandpas tractor all by herself. Her mom overheard me telling someone that I had to override the safety switch, mom just gave me a dirty look and walked away. The good news is that the parents have realized that the kids get a great education when they are here.
  31. 9 likes
    If you are watching "The Dogs Purpose" you will see both my trucks in the movie .We where asked to be extra's in the movie but I think the trucks got more screen time , I had to put the factory rims back on the 59 and I wasn't allowed to wash or wax it .
  32. 9 likes
    I think smiles per gallon is a more worthy goal
  33. 9 likes
  34. 9 likes
    I just got a shot of me and my dad with the *Major Award* that we picked up at this years Clements Tailgate BBQ for "Longest Distance Truck." It wasn't as luxurious, or speedy, or climate controlled a ride as my Camry was on previous visits, but it sure was a lot more fun! My thanks to Tim, Merle, and the rest of you fellers for the assistance and advice these last few years. Great forum (and great annual bbq!). Ralph (& dad)
  35. 9 likes
  36. 9 likes
  37. 8 likes
    After reading i decided to make my own tool using the old upper pivot bar, pivot bar bushings, 2 bolts with 4 washers and 2 washers. I cut the pivot bar to the right size for mounting the shortened pivot bar bushings. I also welded a washer on the pivot bar bushing. I made the just fitting between the arms and secured it with the 2 bolts on the new pivot bar. I mounted the tool on the new bar and mounted the new bushing a few turn to center the bar, see also the link above. Now i could turn both old bushing out,1/16 inch each to spread the upper arm and mounted the new bushing according, see also the link above. After mounting the bushings i turned the old bushings in and removed the tool, the movement of the new bar and bushing is as it should be. Dan Old pivotbar and bushing converted to miller tool
  38. 8 likes
    · · For Decades I have listened to people talk about Flathead Mopar 6 Cylinder Engines in terms of intakes, what is the best carb configuration for their particular situation. Discussions on putting two carbs and those who claim to be sure that is too much carburation or that it will use to much fuel. Then every once in a while the discussion of 3 carbs comes up, and that almost always sparks the debate on how it would take a race motor to need it, or how the engine will bog, or run poorly. In the last 20 years with a good friend of the AoK boys coming across a huge stash of 2 barrel carter weber carbs which were designed for slant six engines, the discussion on utilizing a 2 barrel instead of two singles comes up. I just smile, but then I know that when the stash of 2 barrel carter webers were found, its finder put them on his website as a carb for a flathead mopar. Its amazing how a market can be created and how quickly – “this is the way to go” spreads like rapid fire, without as much as any background check into something. But 1st, let me go back to the 1st time I heard the discussion on multiple carbs vs a single multi-barrel carb, or put another way, comparing that “old technology carter ball and ball vs a modern 4 barrel carb”.. It was about 45 Years ago, when I 1st heard someone in a conversation with my Grandfather and my Dad, suggesting they knew a lot about Flathead Mopars and were sporting a 4 barrel carb on a homemade intake. This gentleman had played with flathead Ford v8s and had came across a Dodge 2 door sedan from the mid-50s. He was suggesting he had built the ultimate flathead Chrysler Engine and he was one of those guys that whatever he had at the moment was just the best and the only way to go. Well after my Dad explained he had far from the ultimate flathead Chrysler, and that his wife’s daily driver (my Mom) was good enough to kick his ass, Dad pulled out my Mom's pickup. It was sporting a bored out 265, with a cam, a factory dual intake and exhaust with a pair of carter ball and balls, and an a833 4 speed tranny. After a little bit of fun that really wasn't much of a contest, licking his wounds sort of speak, Mr "Ultimate Flathead Chrysler" started down the road of excuses when Grandfather shook his head and cut him off at the pass. Grandfather like my Dad were automotive Engineers, and Grandfather literally knew more about Chrysler Flatheads than any person alive. Given he saw the very 1st flathead roll of the line in Windsor, Ontario Canada in 1935 and saw the last block cast in 1959, he had some pretty good credentials to give a lecture. What is explained in a few minutes was not only how the flathead engine worked, but why the engine this gentleman had came with only 1 carb failed to perform. Most think that 1 carb was put on the engine and that it has sufficient carburation for the engine, and if it needed more, Chrysler Engineers would have put more on. On a basic level that is true, but what engineering was building was an engine to a specific HP, torque and fuel consumption target and not to get the most out of the engine, make it as efficient as possible or even have it run to anything close to 100% optimum performance. By Optimum performance I am not talking maximum hp or maximum rpm or optimum fuel mileage on a vehicle. Grandfather then explained that in fact when Chrysler was faced with the need to meet a 5 ton truck specification for dump/plow trucks asked for by Canadian Municipalities during the winter of 1950, that the requirement had filtered to engineering in late 1950. They developed the 265 ci motor which was 3 7/16" bore and 4 3/4" stroke and have dual carbs and dual exhaust on them, which was what was in Mom’s pickup. Few realize that that engine actually had more hp than any other engine on the market. I will attach the picture of the poster that was on Grandfathers office at the time. I gave it to George Asche Jr years ago. In any case you can see the hot v8 mopar had in 1952 was 133 hp and the flathead 6 had more hp. As an aside Grandfather with the cam grind out of the 1952 Chrysler that engine exceeded 150 hp at the time, but given the time, energy and money that have been invested in the new Hemi v8 that was never going to see the light of day on any marketing information. That engine and the fact it had a factory intake, immediately became a stock car favorite in the 1952 season, when Mopar dominated stock car racing everywhere it landed. In any case Chrysler didn't just put on a second carb on it because they needed more carburation. By then Chrysler already had Carter building Ball and Ball carbs from 85cfm - 425 cfm each and we now know they had a 625 cfm carter ball and ball single barrel carb if they needed it. The reason for two was the basic issue, some would call flaw, but Grandfather would call basic restriction to taking the engine to the next level. I say that folding back to the earlier point that Chrysler was building engine to a spec of "x" hp, "y" torque and "z" fuel consumption. The flathead 6 build by Chrysler has 3 Siamese intake ports, each of which feed two cylinders. Setting aside the exhaust for a second, and keeping in mind that an engine is really just a giant vacuum pump, putting 1 carb in the middle of the block, basically over the middle intake port feeding cylinders 3 and 4, means that if all cylinders are the same in compression ratio and ability to create vacuum and suck in a fuel mixture coming from the carb, then cylinder 3 and 4 are going to get more fuel than the intake ports feeding cylinders 1 and 2 or 5 and 6. Yes Chrysler made intake modifications to help that, but they again were not trying to make the perfect engine, just have it meet specs required. As a little aside if your look at intakes from the 1930s through to the 50s you will notice Chrysler Engineers raised the level of the carb. With the Dual Carb truck intake it also was raised further with governors placed under the carbs. The height of the carb mounting above the intake posts can easily be seen to rise from the 1930s to the 1950s. Its also why if your look at some of the aftermarket dual intakes made in the 30s and compare them to say the 3rd generation Edmunds in the 50s you will notice a huge difference in height. The raising of the carbs and providing a smoother run from carb to the intake ports saw huge benefits in performance. Of course maybe buried in the story is the fact that early intake was designed for a marine application where quick rev was far more the desired trait than was torque. When the intake was moved to an automotive application you would find a quick rev with the clutch engaged, but disengaged there is a significant loss in torque and it will actually burn more fuel than a single carb. But back to my story, if we now add the exhaust component into your stock Mopar flathead (or L-head) which depending on what year engine and what vehicle, has the single exhaust exiting at one of a few different locations. For this discussion lets say it exits at the back as does the post ww2 cars. What you find is as the cylinders push out exhaust there is almost no restriction or back pressure at cylinders 5 and 6, but there is a great deal of back pressure at cylinders 1 and 2. So here we have the most back pressure making it tough to push away the exhaust and actually the front intake port receiving the least amount of fuel. While the engine meets specs with no problem, its clear that if you can balance the exhaust, by having 3 exhaust cylinders exit through 1 exhaust pipe and the other three through a 2nd pipe, you can better balance the exhaust back pressure. We sort of glossed over the fact that while there are only 3 intake ports, each cylinder does have its own exhaust port. Something that changed with the introduction of the slant 6, which had 6 equal intake runners each feeding a cylinder. Back to the flathead, if we can better distribute fuel to balance the opportunity for each of the 3 Siamese ports to get fuel, then the engine will run more efficiently. So if you were to take a big block 25 1/2" engine, and anyone of them, not just the 265 and put the factory dual carb and dual exhaust setup on it and then put on the appropriate carter ball and ball carb on it, it will gain hp, torque and improved fuel mileage. The reason is it runs more efficient. The same takes place with the 23 1/2" USA small block which has the same intake and exhaust configuration, although slightly smaller ports. If you take it one step further, putting 1 carb on top of each intake port, you can provide the optimum amount of fuel efficiency for the engine. Back to our 4 barrel friend, putting on a large carb just provides a further opportunity to over fuel the center siamese intake port. When he hammered the throttle it was actually not able to burn all of the fuel in the middle two cylinders and was “bogging” ,until it could gain enough RPM to use some of the fuel. When he was running against Mom’s pickup which had more balanced back pressure, and a better distribution of fuel he had no chance even if the engines were internally the same. Of course they weren't but that is another story. Years later when we created the AoK triple intake, we placed the first intake on an almost rock stock 201 ci motor. It had been rebuilt stock, although required to be bored out 10 thou to clean up cylinders. Beyond that it was a stock cam, intakes etc. With 3 of the smallest CFM carter ball and ball carbs on board and headers made from a stock exhaust systems, the car ran smoother, had better acceleration and got 6 miles per gallon better highway mileage over the single carb and single exhaust. In the end, it is just a myth that you need some bored out, cammed up engine for 2 carbs and a full race motor for 3 carbs. The reason why Chrysler didn't run 3 carbs was simple. 1) The cost of 3 carbs was no inconsequential 2) They could meet the HP, Torque and Fuel useage targets with 1 carb. The exception was when there was a time window where the dual carb, dual exhaust 265 ci motor was released, but with overhead valve v8s and Hemi's coming shortly after the multiple carb flathead life-cycle was short lived. There is a bit more it than that. I have glossed over a bunch of the engineering parts of why you don't just put a carb directly to each intake port with no equalization tube, but I am sure you get the drift. Unlike a v8 where you might try and make carbs progressive because your feeding a intake plenum that equally or close to equally feeding all 8 cylinders, the flathead engine has 3 intake ports each feeding 2 cylinders so progressive carbs just are not effective. On the flathead Mopar, with either 2 or 3 carbs you want them to produce the exact same fuel to feed each of the Siamese ports exactly the same. Its not progressive in terms of additional barrels or carbs, its progressive by pushing on the gas peddle. The key is making sure both or all three carbs are identical and that you have linkage that operates all of them exactly the same. Its a common misconception that they must be hard to keep synced. We have engines with tens of thousands of miles on them with multiple carbs and are never adjusted. George Asche's 1929 Desoto that he has owned since 1950 likely has an unbelievable amount of miles on it and likely the carbs were only touched when George has redone the engine. I own vehicles with 100,000 + miles on them and the linkage for the dual carbs has never touched. That has a lot to do with just how good Carter Ball and Ball carbs are.. We also get asked quite often about modifying the block to provide 6 intake ports, or using webers or other carbs, or running fuel injection. Dad and Grandfather with too much time on their hands, as my Mother would say, did modify a couple of engines to provide 6 intake ports. There were several intakes made including one with an 18" runner set on it, one with 6 side draft webers and one with modified hilborn fuel injection. At the end of the day, with various levels of success, nothing seems to outperform an Edmunds triple carb intake with riser blocks and 3 matched 1952-56 Truck carbs on them and maybe with some jetting changes. Of course, since then we have developed a couple of new cam profiles and of course the AoK triple which utilizes better and modern casting technology, as well as better flow bench testing and computer modelling that neither Chrysler or Eddy Edmunds had. Have we thought about digging out the 6 intake port block that is still in Dad's shop, well yah we have, but that is another project and a blog entry for another time.
  39. 8 likes
    My cousin gave me a 52 Concord 2 door when I was 14, didn't run had lots of rust and the exhaust was rotted off from under the seat back. But it was all there, my next door friend and I got it running after a weeks wait to get money together to get a used battery from the junk yard down the street. Drove around the field, taught all the 12 and up kids in the area how to shift and drive, charged them 50 cents or two gallons of gas for a half hour behind the wheel. Even set up a spot with hay bales to practice parallel parking and three point turns which was part of the NY drivers liscence test. Every kid who practiced passed their tests first time. It was a killer way to meet girls, they came from surrounding towns to practice. Drove it for two summers on the lot, never used my own money for gas after the first week it was up and running. Put on a cherry bomb and a side exit tail pipe. Rebuilt the carb, fuel pump, the Genny,and rebushed the starter. Sold it to a neighbor for 50 bucks. Bought my 46 when I was 21 for 200 dollars in 1970 from the original owner. Done 80% of the work to put it in its current form. Drive it about 3000 miles a season, and endeavor to put one long road trip a year on it. Other than a fan belt and a couple of hot start problems it has never left us stranded. Plymouth builds Great Cars.
  40. 8 likes
    It's been a while. Moved and been driving the wheels off the old truck. It has been great! What a good little workhorse this truck is. No problem keeping up with traffic here anymore. Guess it just needed to be pushed hard and a bit of MMO to get the rings to re seat. I think I even startled some yoyo in a Tesla this morning when he was poking along in front of me. Too bad......wonder what he was thinking as my grille loomed close? For those of you who want to use one of these trucks as a daily driver.......It can be done without too many mods. Jeff
  41. 8 likes
    47 DeSoto: Auxiliary panel I cobbled together. (I found a vinyl stick-on that looks a lot like the engine-turned finish.)
  42. 8 likes
    Ever seen a flat 6 race engine with a BRASS head? I'm guessing the builder used brass to reduce the corrosion problem race boat engines have to deal with. A friend of mine that knows I love flat inline engines sent me this. Anyone else ever seen one?
  43. 8 likes
    Thoughts on the 1937 -1939 Chrysler cars.... The 1937 Plymouth was advertised as the "ALL STEEL" car. This referred to the fact that they were stamping the roofs in solid sheet metal and getting rid of the rectangular vinyl insert that was found on 1936 and prior cars. If you take a good look at the 1939 Plymouth the only "flat" exterior body panels were the two vertical drop boards that go between the hood halves and the front fenders. Every other inch of the car has some king of curved or compound curved surface. As a result the 1939 Plymouth Coupes were considered "bulbous" with huge curved fenders, roof line and trunk lid. It seems the technical ability to stamp / press large panels of metal into extremely curvaceous body panels reached a crescendo with the 1939 Plymouth Coupe (and sedans to a lesser extent). As a result some people find the 39's overdone. They look almost cartoon like...and I love it. The 1940 and on redesign saw the bodies widen and the fenders shrink. The 1941 Plymouth might be one of the most balanced designs of the decade and is a poor mans classic. The point is that prior to 1940 the cars peaked in their curvaceous styling and "roundness", maybe a love it or leave it for some folks but none the less a beautiful exercise in design and technical abilities to produce an almost exaggerated larger then life statement. Over 30 years of ownership the 1939 Plymouth Coupe has had many small children literally run from their parents towards the car like it was a "cartoon" car in larger then life scale. Let me know what you think. Pictured below.......
  44. 8 likes
    Oh yeah......its on! APRIL 1ST 2017...really, no foolin. .....just thought I'd warn y'all....get your trucks ready!!!!!! "THIS TIME ITS FOR REAL!!!!!" Or should I say "Damn...Number Ten !!!" Unbelievable, #10 !!!!!....the place where the largest number of Dodge Pilot-House Era Trucks meet in the whole WORLD !! (I think..lol). The people I've met over the last 9 BBQ's has made my life so much better. This time of year is so awesome because finishing an old truck actually has meaning to the crowd you'll see here! Fenders and bumpers to hang on, hoods to lift, parts to swap, and stories to tell! I look forward to it all. Last year was a special one with returning long distant travelers and new ones I hope make the trip again. I've had a busy, busy year since the last BBQ....got married, rebooted a business, traveled the coast to see friends, and continue to get my kids finished up with college. My brother's truck should be up and running, along with my truck looking just a bit better than last year! Its a big one this year, the guys are coming from the north, the south, the east and the west. You know you'll meet someone you know from the forum, and it'll be the coolest thing ever...I know...I have good friends in far away states because this here BBQ. Come on down! "The car crowd is growing and more than welcome to come. I could easliy call it "The Tailgate/Trunk BBQ"!" "I can't tell you how much I look forward to this every year, its a blast and for some, lasts a few days. Campers show up on Thursday or Friday and leave on a Sunday morning.....all enjoying late night chat sessions around the fire pit." "I hope new and old members alike are inspired to make the trip and maybe even drive their trucks the distance....you know we have your back! " "So many good stories around the fire pit the nights before and after the event. I can't tell how cool it is to have forum members stay several days and just relax....." "Looking forward to a great party! Now build it, and bring it!!!" "It was around 2007 when Bob Koch, Jim Shepard, and myself (Tim Estrada), went to Reg Evans' place to check out his "yard". While we were eating hotdogs, drinking cold beverages, solving international and regional issues....we thought "lets have a BBQ". "Get the wheels on, and the tanks full....its time to finish up and git to the Q! It ain't no beauty pageant of trailer queens, its a truck show...so flex your rust as well as your shine!" Tim aka 48Dodger
  45. 8 likes
  46. 8 likes
    Well it took me a while to post it but as promised here one of the pictures with us in front of the 52. Just a couple of youngsters. Kind of a shame we covered up so much of the cab lol.
  47. 8 likes
    Yeah,but even that is more for theoretical purposes than practical use. Probably the biggest factor beyond our control is where and how we have to drive. If you live in a busy city and drive on busy streets with lots of traffic and red lights,the set up that gives maximum fuel economy is irrelevant because that is always listed for highway mileage. If you live in hilly country instead of flat country,that's another huge factor where steady RPM's at cruising speeds are irrelevant. Given the output of our flat 6's and how hard they have to work to just get up steep grades,that's probably be biggest MPG killer of all. BUT......various people here talking about operating different engine,tire,weight,and geared vehicles over various types of roads and conditions gives us all insights into what will GENERALLY work best for all of us. If you expect to get maximum economy under all conditions,your only hope is to buy a new car with computer controlled everything. We,and the cars and trucks we drive operate in a time in space where you are only in a perfect state of tune at idle or wide-open throttle. Which means there is more to fuel economy and drive-ability to us than just a torque curve. We have to make compromises so our vehicles are at least semi-efficient to all our needs. Guys who just take their cars out on weekend highway runs can pretty much dial them in for the majority of the cars use,and so can guys that live in cities and mostly drive to drive-ins or parks for casual shows or meets. The later don't really care about maximum MPG at 60 MPH,but they do care about torque at take off. People that live in snowy mountain country or cities in the frozen north will be more concerned about fluid drives,torque converters,and outright automatic transmissions than they will overdrive transmissions. How boring would this and every other board be if we had a focus so narrow there was always one set of answers to any questions asked? Hell,we might as wlll all buy new 4 cylinder Altimas and be done with it. Providing of course we could all agree on the paint and interior colors.
  48. 8 likes
  49. 8 likes
  50. 8 likes
    This wonderfull 1941 Chrysler Royal Business coupe is now located in switzerland !!!! Alex