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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/10/2019 in all areas

  1. 7 points
    In a previous thread the discussion was centered around whether or not a bypass filter is needed and the best oil for our mature engines. Based on that discussion and pondering this topic for a few days after pulling the oil pan I decided to install a spin-on filter on my non-filtered engine. I've seen a couple of photos on the forum of filter installations but decided to offer a more complete tutorial for the benefit of owners who may want to explore a filter installation. I chose a mount and filter from Wix because they offer a mount and selection of filters that are specifically for bypass operation. Bypass filters are constructed differently from full-flow filters and provide a finer degree of filtration than conventional filters. I sourced the mount and filter from Rock Auto who have not only the filter I use but also the same filter in three additional lengths. I selected the next to shortest due to the confined space around the engine. Here is the mount, part number WIX 24755: Note the arrows indicating the proper direction of flow. This mount is only for bypass installations and has a small 5/8" nipple instead of the more common 3/4" seen on full-flow installations. It also has 1/8" NPT threads that allow 3/16" steel brake lines to be attached with only one 90* adapter. The filter is WIX 51051: The other Wix bypass filters that fit this mount are 51050, 51320, and 51704. A bracket must be fabricated to attach the mount to the engine block. I used 1/8" steel and drilled it for the mount and two studs on the engine head: The two fittings on the engine accept 3/16" brake lines with no modification. I found 12" lines to be ideal for this installation. Accessing the fittings and getting the threads straight deep in the engine compartment is kinda tedious....just consider it a character-building experience. Permatex #2 (non-hardening) gasket sealer was used on the brass fitting where they screwed in the filter mount. I've seen teflon tape used in situations like this but that is risky in oil systems unless you really know what you are doing. A small sliver of tape that breaks loose can create havoc if it plugs an oil passage. A couple of thick washers are behind the bracket to provide clearance for the heads of the bolts securing the filter mount. The threads in the cylinder head are common 3/8" and the nuts on the studs are 3/8" fine thread. One of the studs backed out so I replaced it with a bolt. Prior to installing the filter I filled it with oil. This photo shows the difference between a bypass filter and full-flow---notice the tiny holes through which oil flows in/out of the filter. Filling the filter was very tedious....if I had to do this very often I would rig up some sort of syringe to push oil into the filter instead of spending 1/2 hour adding oil a fraction of an ounce at a time. The filter accepted a cupful of oil before it was satisfied. The finished installation complete with a note on the mileage and date of filter change. The oil lines need to be formed for clearance so the filter can be easily changed. Yes, this is not for those who want a period-correct engine bay, but I like having a modern filter which can be easily sourced through common channels. If my engine is happy....I'm happy.
  2. 5 points
    49D-24BusCpe

    DeSoto Pickup!

    Just your local neighborhood DeSoto V-8 pickup!
  3. 5 points
    Frank Elder

    DeSoto Pickup!

    I put a V8 in the fridge, no modifications needed.
  4. 5 points
    ggdad1951

    Check this thing out

    erf...that's one FUGLY truck
  5. 4 points
    I've been looking for a set of C-clamps for my 48 DeSoto bus. coupe for months now. They don't come with a U-joint kit and they are not parts commonly carried by parts dealers, including Andy Bernbaum. These are the little parts that without them, the car don't go! Where I laid my C-clamps when I removed them some 35 years ago, I can't say. Some people told me about junk yards with 1940s Chryslers and DeSotos, but I found that beyond taking your name and your wanted parts, they are not any help. At least not for just some fasteners under a car. The president of the DeSoto club said he had a 47 DeSoto parts car, but when he went out there to get the parts, he found that the car had no drive train. So after advertising in several old car venues, DodgeB4ya, contacted me with the parts he had taken off of a 47 DeSoto coupe over 30 years ago. Thankfully, he saved them and even cleaned off 70 years of grime before shipping them to me. I got them today and gave them a quick spray job using Rustoleum Hammer Finish because I happened to have it handy. I bought that spray can to refinish a Comfort Master heater which has that same hammer finish. So thanks Rob! Marc.
  6. 4 points
    Just didn't want to work the way it was suppose to! IPS support (the forum software vendor) got it sorted out the site back online.
  7. 3 points
    westaus29

    1938 Aussie 7 Passenger Plymouth

    I have visited this site a few times in the past but recently started again and have been impressed with the activity, the assistance offered and the relevance to my interests. I currently have a 1929 Plymouth tourer with body by Holden Australia restored on club licence since 1999, a 1955 Plymouth Belvedere Suburban RHD built in Detroit with 259 V8 and 2 speed auto also on club licence, and a 1938 7 passenger Plymouth with Aussie Richards body, in a million pieces. This my first attempt at a post with pics so hope it works. I purchased the '38 running and licensed in Feb 1981 with the plan of having a car I could use for club events while I slowly rebuilt my 1929 Plymouth from a wreck. It was painted black, the engine barely ran and the leather upholstery was falling apart, but we drove it onto the trailer under its own steam. I cant find any pictures of it as bought but I must have been dazzled by the fact it was a 7 passenger and had all its chrome and fittings. There was no water in the radiator and It turned out the engine had a hole in the head above No 1 cylinder, every pot had broken rings, and water had corroded the bearings, crank and camshaft. The bottom of each centre door post was rusted out, and there was rust in the boot (trunk) area. By July 1982 I had it on the road with new paint (Ford Neptune Blue), new tyres and a temporary engine out of a 1936 Dodge utility (pickup) that we found abandoned up in the hills, and sheets tacked over rebuilt seat frames. My daughter in the pic below is now 41! In the next couple of years I fixed oil leaks, replaced spring bushings, brakes and wheel bearings and changed the diff from original 7 passenger 4.3 to standard 4.1 ratio as we tend to travel longish distances. By 1984 I was ready to replace the interior with upholstery in original blue leather. When I stripped the hood lining I discovered I had serious rust issues under the lead used in large quantities on the roof, which was fabricated from a standard roof cut in half with a central insert about 18 inches wide. The repairs were completed by Nov 1985 and the car was back on the road, however the upholstery guy was no longer available. In 1988 we had a surprise addition to the family, a baby girl after 17 year drought! The upholstery money went on adding a bedroom. In the meantime the car was used as a daily driver by my wife on the school run - rule was "no running in the car"! By 1995 the brake lines had rusted thru, the radiator had collapsed for the second time, the exhaust was shot, valves keep sticking and to cap it off I backed it into our Falcon wagon and badly dented the boot. I deregistered it in disgust as by that time I was making progress on the 29. Fast forward to 2012 and we have changed address, I now have 1/2 acre and a 5 bay shed. However to fit the 7 passenger in it I had to remove the front clip. The car is now a mobile storage unit for surfboards, wetsuits and a couple of broken chairs. But it still runs! I plan to post an outline of the rebuild process which started in 2012, but here is a recent pic of the body on a home made rotisserie - stripping back roof to bare metal after a VERY bad sand blast and prime job. Jim
  8. 3 points
  9. 3 points
    Douglas

    Woodgrain Thoughts

    I was able to find a guy near me that did my wood grain with Hydrographics. Dash and all frames for about 600$ with a satin clear coat
  10. 2 points
    10th anniversary party for my tattoo shop was tonite at Neshaminy Creek Brewing Co. My band played and a few others- I went in style!
  11. 2 points
    Jerry Roberts

    DeSoto Pickup!

    I drive my 1941 Plymouth truck a lot . Front disks and ' highway ' gears .
  12. 2 points
    Mr tech and his training films...
  13. 2 points
    Yes, you are correct on your pressure/return connections at the block. If you look at the upper one it is part of a full length ridge along the block that is the oil pressure gallery. I believe there are 4 plugs along this gallery. One of them is used to feed oil to your filter. The bottom connection point is just above the oil pressure control valve. The oil returning from the filter has to pass through this valve. (I believe Mr. Coatney has a good cut-away photo of this valve showing it's operation) When the engine is producing good oil pressure the valve will open to relieve the excess pressure and dump it back to the sump. At this time it also opens a path for the return oil from the filter to return to the sump. If the engine oil pressure drops below the working limit of the valve the valve will close to maintain all pump flow to the bearings. At this time it will also close off the return flow from the filter to ensure that all oil flow from the pump goes to engine lubrication. As for the filter connections, this depends on the manufacturer. You state that you have a Wix filter housing that calls for a PC10 filter element. And, as you have stated, this crosses to the modern Wix 51010 filter element. This is a cellulose (pleated paper) type filter element. Pleated cellulose filter elements are typically designed to filter from outside-in, which would require your feed like to connect to the outside of the canister so that oil will fill the canister and flow through the filter to the inner tube, where it can return to the engine. One of the photos you posted above is my engine with a filter from the Deluxe Filter Company, and it calls for a JC filter element. This JC element crosses to the Wix 51011, which is a sock type element. I prefer the Baldwin JC405 as I find they fit the canister better. In my Deluxe filter the canister is stamped at the ports, IN and OUT. The OUT is at the top side port. In this filter setup the oil enters through the center post, flows through the sock type element from the inside-out. These filters are a tight fit into the canister so the oil has to migrate up through the filter media to the top of the filter where it can then flow back to the sump. Under the cap is a perforated dome that holds the filter element below the return port and squeezes it tight into the canister. As Pete said, you may need to clean and inspect your filter canister to correctly determine which port is truly the Inlet and which is the outlet. If you haven't had the cover off in a while it may be time to do that, and replace the element. That will give you the opportunity to study the filter canister a bit more. Merle
  14. 2 points
    White Spyder

    Rear brake work time

    Got it! Used a 4' pipe over my 1/2 inch drive. When it let go, there was a loud bang and I thought I had broken the driver. Getting that side drum off was also tough glad I invested in the puller.
  15. 2 points
    check your coil, though it runs good cold, it will overheat if on the way out....it will die and later restart when cold. You can still see a light amount of spark but it is not strong enough to fire a lean engine...
  16. 2 points
    Well the Mississippi River is there for a reason and there is always those that say we have a left coast and a RIGHT coast...and that western coast some day folks will ask what became of it.. and the answer will still be correct to say it LEFT
  17. 2 points
    Silly Yankees and Rebels, everyone knows the West is the Best, our old Mopars don't rust!
  18. 2 points
    Fixed your post for you...
  19. 2 points
    Okay this is too cool. Went on vacation in the U.P. MI on Round Lake this week end where my dad use to go when he was young. Great grandfather had a cabin that now my dad's uncle owns. My great Aunt showed me a picture of my great grandmothers plymouth. The picture was in Graford TX and the girl is my great Aunt. picture is black and white but she says it was charlotte ivory. I know its four door and mine is a two door, but I'm starting to believe the car (and the color) picked me rather than me picking it.
  20. 2 points
    tom'sB2B

    Cheers To Wives Who Support Us

    My old lady is a keeper too. Never gives me a hard time on money spent. Always pestering me to go for a ride in one of the vehicles. She doesn't like to get dirty, but helps out when I need a hand.
  21. 1 point
    Hickory

    Radial tires on original wheels

    rim flex, it's real.....
  22. 1 point
    you just tire of the run around these days trying to find something to work with for a car that has long outlived its prime time....today that magic number is often 7 years..
  23. 1 point
    I've found puppy training pads to be a nice addition to the shop when working with old vehicles that aren't completely housebroken: They can be cut up into smaller pieces to catch drips and dribbles when an oil filter is changed. I keep one under the P15's transmission that insists on marking its territory in spite of my training efforts.... Also works for me if I'm in the middle of a repair job I just can't turn loose of !!?!! 😆
  24. 1 point
    Frank Elder

    1948 Dodge Other Pickups

    Its got a hemi in it. And not a 48....
  25. 1 point
    Dodgeb4ya

    1947 Chrysler steering column removal

    Do exactly as you said as long as the floor plan does not interfere...
  26. 1 point
    Brent B3B

    Cheers To Wives Who Support Us

    Where's the "old lady" ? Geez, If she has a drivers license yet, let her drive the D24 to the next BBQ and you follow in the B2 😁
  27. 1 point
    MackTheFinger

    Home shop projects?

    No matter how hard you try you just can't make a Corvette look good..
  28. 1 point
    Plymouthy Adams

    DeSoto Pickup!

    yes, but the very fact that your dad did not knuckle and buy you a cool car may well be reason you alive today....say Thank you dad...
  29. 1 point
    Steve, thank you for the read and kind comments. I'm reminded of the old adage...."Paralysis by Analysis"........ The Wix filter mount I have appears to be well machined and no operational issues have popped up. If the casting was defective it would be apparent when test fitting a filter on the bench. It really is a simple component, not much to go wrong. The nipple threads are smooth on the adapter I have and the gasket engages evenly. If oil spillage is a concern, just place a plastic bag around the filter when you initially unscrew it, any excess oil will drain into the bag instead of on the starter that has 70+ years of crud on it....... The original canister filter is certainly a proven design, however, I don't see any operational downsides to the Wix filter installation.........probably best to find something else to worry about.
  30. 1 point
    49D-24BusCpe

    DeVal 265 Replaces 230!

    Two of us spent four days replacing the '56 Power Wagon 230 that was in my D-24 Business Coupe, with a '90 DeVal 265. My DeVal is a brand new, never-run U.S. Navy JG-75 aircraft tug QEC power-plant. It is a Chrysler Industrial IND-32 clone. The block was cast on 6-19-90! I purchased the car during '12, converted the driveline (to a T-5 transmission and a '65 B-body 8.75 axle) during '13, and finally replaced the engine on 7-19. There's still more to be done!
  31. 1 point
    Not very, I'm near Huntsville, AL.
  32. 1 point
    Plymouthy Adams

    Check this thing out

    probably the only way you would come out ahead....
  33. 1 point
    Coil failure was a problem on some Fords back in then 80's and 90's My neighbor ran his own repair business in his garage and I know he changed out several of the them That did the same thing you describe. I had forgotten about it until the other posters mentioned it.
  34. 1 point
    mrwrstory

    Roadside Art

    ...........Amen!
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point
    I got the new vinyl panel sewn up in the center with a little french seam and wrapped the rear surround ABS plastic panel in diamond stitch. It came out ok but next one I do I will pick some foam off the panels that glue to the reverse side- the foam is glued but the vinyl is only sewn to the vinyl not glued so it tends to ‘delaminate’ on the back side. I don’t think it’s gonna cause a problem once it’s stuffed into place. Fingers crossed it still fits!
  37. 1 point
    Plymouthy Adams

    Roadside Art

    good call…...But looking at the parting line on the hood I am guessing hood is off the hinges and thus strapped to keep it in position while they rip off a buyer, eeer sell this vehicle. Anyway, this is my take on the crime scene
  38. 1 point
    Worden18

    Hi from austraila with a 55 desoto

    Looks good! And welcome. Keep us updated on your progress 👍
  39. 1 point
    tub1

    Hi from austraila with a 55 desoto

    welcome from tasmania
  40. 1 point
    Good idea keithb7. Should read at least be 100 psi or so and all cylinders should be relatively even.
  41. 1 point
    kencombs

    Rear brake work time

    At times like that, I'm sure happy with my IR impact and 165psi shop air! If that's not available, I'd use a good s 3/4"drive six point socket, breaker bar and 4lb hammer. My 1/2" stuff flexes too much.
  42. 1 point
    Pete

    Check this thing out

    It does nothing for me, but I wish I had that kind of time on my hands.
  43. 1 point
    That all depends on the filter design. Some feed in from the bottom and return out the upper side. I know that mine is that way. I would ditch the rubber hoses and rig up some hard lines that would clear the starter.
  44. 1 point
    48Dodger

    Cheers To Wives Who Support Us

    Having Stephanie in my life, is beyond my writing capabilities. She has filled a big hole in my heart and embraced my love and need for the old trucks. She has never been involved with the old truck world like she is now, and loves the friends she has made by being a part of it all. Her beauty is only eclipsed by her intelligence. She manages the books for the house as well as our business. She often gives me the "Ok" for automotive purchases based on a wish list she has me keep updated...lol. Her 1945 COE is a priority and will be underway when we locate The "right" platform (frame) for the project.
  45. 1 point
    I have a pair of '39 Plym rear fenders... They have some issues but are very solid fenders.. For your info, '37-38-39 Plyms all use the same rear fenders.
  46. 1 point
    1949 Wraith

    Splitting a stock Manifold

    I had mine done for my Canadian long block. I have had no issues with carb icing since the heat riser has been removed and I drive the car when roads are clear when temps are down to 20F and that is only because the car has no heater.
  47. 1 point
    Dodgeb4ya

    Back to the 50's 2019

    Looks like that Diesel guy found his limit pulling too long and too big of load. Gotta a diesel ....it'll pull anything😟 don't think so.. There are limits...be safe.
  48. 1 point
    I also have 215 75 on my 52 Cranbrook and have no problems with drivabilty. Air pressure at 35 PSI
  49. 1 point
    BobT-47P15

    Radial tires on original wheels

    I use 215 -75-15 radial B F Goodrich tires from Coker on 1955 Chrysler narrow wire wheels. I like the look of that size. And now they make a narrow tread width radial close to size and look of bias ply. Neither is cheap.
  50. 1 point
    blucarsdn

    Radial tires on original wheels

    I ran P205/75R14 on my '56 & '57 T-Birds for twenty-five years on the stock wheels with no issues. I run 15" radials on my '39 P8. Inflation in the one issue you have to watch, radials are high pressure tires. 32-34 lbs minimum.


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