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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/19/2013 in all areas

  1. 18 points
    I've been asked a lot of things by a lot of different people in my life. Giving advice, lending a hand, being politely asked to leave..., they are all generally of a similar class of requests such that not many are ever a surprise anymore. That was true most of my life until as of late. Now I'm getting surprised all the time. Here's some examples. Looking for any and every excuse to drive my truck, I took my kids to a birthday/costume party. In a few minutes parents were asking for kids to pose in and on the truck. Why not? A couple weeks later, again looking for an excuse to drive it, we used it to go to the local Chili Cook-off. It was pretty easy to just put the old slow cooker in the back and drive over. I stopped to drop off my entry and then went and parked. Within 30 minutes the organizers were looking for the owner of "that old black truck". They wanted to park it in the middle of the event for ambiance. Well, ambiance and picture poising. So many people wanted to crawl in and out of it, my view was obscured more than once. The wife bought a new mattress and box spring from Sears but refused to pay the $80 delivery charge. She was going to bring it home on the top of the Ford Escape. I mentioned that I had a truck which she had not considered. Not sure why she didn't - too "special?". We laughed. So we drove down to the outlet, tied the new items up and headed home. Near home I was trying to make a lane change but was blocked by some lady in a car. She kept matching my speed! I finally just decided to turn right. She ducked in behind us and followed. I remarked to the wife that if she pulled along side that the truck was $17,5k firm. We laughed and turned left. The lady followed. A couple of stop signs later, the car behind us pulled up and waved for my wife's attention. Seems she was getting married Saturday and wanted to be taken to the church and reception in my truck. My dirty, old, smells like gas, farm truck. If you would have seen her smile, heard her excitement, you wouldn't have said no either. What to charge her got me thinking about one of 48Dodger's blog posts. The question was about being able to put a proper the price on our parts or services. I was struggling with that and it took me a while to come up with a clear answer for myself. In the end I didn't charge her a penny. Couldn't really. There was no price on a blushing bride, clearly happy about going to her wedding in an old farm truck. There was no payment large enough for the looks on people's faces, the thumbs up, as we passed them on the way to the church. You certainly could never have found enough of any payment of any kind for the entire church gathering's collective look as we drove off with the newlyweds in the front cab. I got paid with this story. With smiles. Good feelings all around. I'm lucky enough to be in a position to make some people happy. Whether you know it or not Tim, you do the same thing for a lot of people here. Did for me.
  2. 15 points
    Brent B3B

    get out there and mingle

    Half the fun of this hobby for me, is getting to meet the people who share the same passion. please feel free to add your photos of you and forum members you met to this thread (along with a classic) this year I have been fortunate enough to do some traveling and meet and visit with some folks. it started in April at the BBQ in CA. unfortunately, I was so busy "BS ing" with people I didn't take any photos then I had a visitor in June (space reserved for 48D photo ) Tim brought his new bride to Oregon ( I think it was just so he can reflect later and say "at least we don't live there ) was able to meet some guys at the BTT50's GGdad, John U Brent and Young Ed and ggdad, Mike B-1-D-116 EVEN was given a ride in FEF (that was Awesome!) this weekend capped off an unbelievable summer for me, made the drive to see DodgeB4YA and BIG RED EVEN was given a ride in BIG RED! (that was also Awesome!) I am privileged and humbled by the hospitality and knowledge you folks give! Julie and I thank you for a great year! (hey I just noticed.... looks like I better change my shirt )
  3. 14 points
    I just wanted to say I'm sorry to the guys who have been trying to get parts form me this last year....I've been pulled from so many different directions and have had a few life changes at home. Before as a single man (a widower actually) I was able to drown myself in everything Dodge related, stay up really late and sleep in on my days off.....for years!!!!!! Since getting married, to a super fantastic woman who took the time to restore me, It seems like I have been reinventing myself. In a good way of course. But that has come with a few sacrifices, and hopefully I'll be able to play with my spare parts soon. After months of work, we finally sold her house. It was a huge undertaking involving several remolding projects and repair work, but it paid off. That of course led to a dream of mine to own a building in town (clements, ca) to have a business that deals with vehicles. She has embraced that dream too, and now we own a building I've had my eye on since 2009. It took some fancy foot work to get from point A to point B.....but all that paperwork, phone calling, meetings, more paperwork, sweating, more phone calling......etc. again, it paid off. We now own that building!! Today will be our first day with the keys. Its been a new beginning for me since the first time I laid eyes on my wife and I feel very, very fortunate! Digging through the yard parts, pulling suff that guys really need, is a lot of fun work......soon I will be back doing that, but right now I'm enjoying the changes in my life and hope it keeps going. After working more than 30 years for "the man"....it will be fun trying out the other side of the desk...lol. It will be a slow transition from my current job, but I'm looking forward to the adventure. 48D
  4. 14 points
    Enough. If you don't like the rules then don't post. I'm closing this thread and if you start another with the same rant you will be banned. We have very few restrictions and the one for limiting ads to the classified section is based on the negative experiences members had when we allowed them in the forums. I pay for the bandwidth, I get to set the rules. Bashing mods/members is not acceptable. Any thing else PM me again and we will address it off line.
  5. 13 points
    Don Jordan

    I did it!!

    With no radio, no windshield wipers, no phone I decided to visit my cousin in Cloverdale, California. It took me 10 hours to get from Southern California to the San Francisco bay area. Next day 3 hours to get to Cloverdale. It was about 1156 miles (round trip). I'm going to figure out how much gas I used and see what my mileage was. The car drove like a champ. I don't like driving at night because I don't have dash lights - I don't have dash lights because I don't drive at night. Going across the Golden Gate bridge gave me chills. It was 1948, I was lost in dreams. At my cousins he took apart my WS wiper motor (and told me it's not a motor but we couldn't figure out what to call it). I am going to have wind shield wipers. I don't want to make a novel out of this but just wanted to say all the money I've put into that silly car was worth it.
  6. 13 points
    I find that guys like me, on the DIY sites, never seem to think anything is rare or as valuable as stated on Craigslist or EBay. It might be guys like me are not the ones to ask. I can fabricate, paint, tweak, locate or trade whatever I need when it comes to the 48-53 dodge trucks…I got friends too. So maybe it just seems easier for me, which somehow translates to cheaper? Maybe less valuable? I have to look at a recent event that made me think about my attitude. Why pay a mechanic 500 bucks when you can do it for 20? This just happened to me. I fixed Mom's 2004 Grand Marque for 12 bucks. The Light Control Module had failed.....the dealership wanted 650 bucks (replace the LCM), the other shop (2nd opinion) wanted 560 bucks. I was like "What??? Let me look at it" I did the research on the internet, found the common problem disscussed on a forum, and fixed it with improvements recommended by the thread starter. A failed relay needed replacing; 12 bucks in parts....took me maybe an hour. It’s not original, but using wires to relocate the relay that has problems, outside the module, makes it easy to replace when it fails again. The price of a new Light Control Module ranged from 100 to 400 dollars.....the relay was 3 bucks (wires, etc made up the rest of the cost). Of course this was Mom, but I got to thinking.....why don't I see what I did as valuable? Did I just want to prove those wrench heads are overpriced???? If it wasn't Mom, would I have charged 90 bucks for the time and 12 bucks for the parts? I don’t know, I did take a free lunch and the satisfaction of knowing I saved my Mom from the wolves. Or did I? The shop was charging for the part and the labor. It seems my default is to undercharge based on some moral dilemma I created in my head based on the fact I personally can do things cheaper for myself. I paint cars on the side, but do it cheaper because my overhead is lower etc….but how is that my fault? Again, I think it’s a Do It Yourself mentality that’s skewed my interpretation of value. Looking at Craigslist, I see 48-53 trucks that are clearly over priced….uh….that I think are overpriced. And the crooks on EBay that have NO idea how to price a damn vintage fender….err…I FEEL are uninformed of a reasonable price for classic steel. It’s there that I wonder if I should take a closer look at how I’m applying said worth to the stock pile of parts I sometimes give away or sell cheap to fellow vintage truck owners to help them out. Not that I want to change my practices (I know you’re reading this Mike aka Trampsteer, lol) but maybe bring myself into the 21st century and give the guys who are charging possibly the “right” price for these trucks and the parts a break from my attitude, and maybe give myself a bigger pat on the back when I make a what I consider a good deal. Okay….so maybe this is where it really started. It’s been a few months since I fixed Mom’s car, when she calls me and says she received a notice in the mail. Ford sent her a letter stating that her year car has been having troubles with the LCM. They would like to extend the warranty to have the problem fixed. If it has already been fixed by a non dealer, etc… to provide the bill to Ford and they will reimburse the money…….damn. Ford owes Mom 12 bucks and a lunch, lol.
  7. 12 points
    1940plymouth

    Just wanted to share

    This coming Friday it will be two weeks that I found out I have multiple myeloma which is a cancer of the bone marrow. I had a biopsy of my bone marrow done that day and a full body pet scan this past Friday. This coming Friday I will find out the results. I have posted this on the POC Facebook page and for those who know me, I am always posting photos of Cooper and I being out and about with the old Plymouth, well this afternoon when I got the mail there was an envelope from Andy Bernbaum's. Now I haven't ordered anything from them recently and didn't know what to expect. I opened up the envelope and there was this great letter along with some neat Plymouth information. I have attached the letter to share with each and everyone of you as it make me cry and my heart warm with the thought that old car people are some of the best people on the face of the earth. I hope it will be large enough to read Merry Christmas, Bob, Patty and naturally Cooper
  8. 12 points
    Duskylady

    She's Finished!

    It's taken a long while but we got her put together this spring. Her name is Bettie. She ran so well that we chose to take her to the Hot Rod Dirt Drags in Monte Vista, Colorado. Won 1-3 against a big black merc. Blew up a second flex plate and found out the steering column needs a new bearing. Even with that she drove there and back home without a complaint! Woot!
  9. 11 points
    · · For Decades I have listened to people talk about Flathead Mopar 6 Cylinder Engines in terms of intakes, what is the best carb configuration for their particular situation. Discussions on putting two carbs and those who claim to be sure that is too much carburation or that it will use to much fuel. Then every once in a while the discussion of 3 carbs comes up, and that almost always sparks the debate on how it would take a race motor to need it, or how the engine will bog, or run poorly. In the last 20 years with a good friend of the AoK boys coming across a huge stash of 2 barrel carter weber carbs which were designed for slant six engines, the discussion on utilizing a 2 barrel instead of two singles comes up. I just smile, but then I know that when the stash of 2 barrel carter webers were found, its finder put them on his website as a carb for a flathead mopar. Its amazing how a market can be created and how quickly – “this is the way to go” spreads like rapid fire, without as much as any background check into something. But 1st, let me go back to the 1st time I heard the discussion on multiple carbs vs a single multi-barrel carb, or put another way, comparing that “old technology carter ball and ball vs a modern 4 barrel carb”.. It was about 45 Years ago, when I 1st heard someone in a conversation with my Grandfather and my Dad, suggesting they knew a lot about Flathead Mopars and were sporting a 4 barrel carb on a homemade intake. This gentleman had played with flathead Ford v8s and had came across a Dodge 2 door sedan from the mid-50s. He was suggesting he had built the ultimate flathead Chrysler Engine and he was one of those guys that whatever he had at the moment was just the best and the only way to go. Well after my Dad explained he had far from the ultimate flathead Chrysler, and that his wife’s daily driver (my Mom) was good enough to kick his ass, Dad pulled out my Mom's pickup. It was sporting a bored out 265, with a cam, a factory dual intake and exhaust with a pair of carter ball and balls, and an a833 4 speed tranny. After a little bit of fun that really wasn't much of a contest, licking his wounds sort of speak, Mr "Ultimate Flathead Chrysler" started down the road of excuses when Grandfather shook his head and cut him off at the pass. Grandfather like my Dad were automotive Engineers, and Grandfather literally knew more about Chrysler Flatheads than any person alive. Given he saw the very 1st flathead roll of the line in Windsor, Ontario Canada in 1935 and saw the last block cast in 1959, he had some pretty good credentials to give a lecture. What is explained in a few minutes was not only how the flathead engine worked, but why the engine this gentleman had came with only 1 carb failed to perform. Most think that 1 carb was put on the engine and that it has sufficient carburation for the engine, and if it needed more, Chrysler Engineers would have put more on. On a basic level that is true, but what engineering was building was an engine to a specific HP, torque and fuel consumption target and not to get the most out of the engine, make it as efficient as possible or even have it run to anything close to 100% optimum performance. By Optimum performance I am not talking maximum hp or maximum rpm or optimum fuel mileage on a vehicle. Grandfather then explained that in fact when Chrysler was faced with the need to meet a 5 ton truck specification for dump/plow trucks asked for by Canadian Municipalities during the winter of 1950, that the requirement had filtered to engineering in late 1950. They developed the 265 ci motor which was 3 7/16" bore and 4 3/4" stroke and have dual carbs and dual exhaust on them, which was what was in Mom’s pickup. Few realize that that engine actually had more hp than any other engine on the market. I will attach the picture of the poster that was on Grandfathers office at the time. I gave it to George Asche Jr years ago. In any case you can see the hot v8 mopar had in 1952 was 133 hp and the flathead 6 had more hp. As an aside Grandfather with the cam grind out of the 1952 Chrysler that engine exceeded 150 hp at the time, but given the time, energy and money that have been invested in the new Hemi v8 that was never going to see the light of day on any marketing information. That engine and the fact it had a factory intake, immediately became a stock car favorite in the 1952 season, when Mopar dominated stock car racing everywhere it landed. In any case Chrysler didn't just put on a second carb on it because they needed more carburation. By then Chrysler already had Carter building Ball and Ball carbs from 85cfm - 425 cfm each and we now know they had a 625 cfm carter ball and ball single barrel carb if they needed it. The reason for two was the basic issue, some would call flaw, but Grandfather would call basic restriction to taking the engine to the next level. I say that folding back to the earlier point that Chrysler was building engine to a spec of "x" hp, "y" torque and "z" fuel consumption. The flathead 6 build by Chrysler has 3 Siamese intake ports, each of which feed two cylinders. Setting aside the exhaust for a second, and keeping in mind that an engine is really just a giant vacuum pump, putting 1 carb in the middle of the block, basically over the middle intake port feeding cylinders 3 and 4, means that if all cylinders are the same in compression ratio and ability to create vacuum and suck in a fuel mixture coming from the carb, then cylinder 3 and 4 are going to get more fuel than the intake ports feeding cylinders 1 and 2 or 5 and 6. Yes Chrysler made intake modifications to help that, but they again were not trying to make the perfect engine, just have it meet specs required. As a little aside if your look at intakes from the 1930s through to the 50s you will notice Chrysler Engineers raised the level of the carb. With the Dual Carb truck intake it also was raised further with governors placed under the carbs. The height of the carb mounting above the intake posts can easily be seen to rise from the 1930s to the 1950s. Its also why if your look at some of the aftermarket dual intakes made in the 30s and compare them to say the 3rd generation Edmunds in the 50s you will notice a huge difference in height. The raising of the carbs and providing a smoother run from carb to the intake ports saw huge benefits in performance. Of course maybe buried in the story is the fact that early intake was designed for a marine application where quick rev was far more the desired trait than was torque. When the intake was moved to an automotive application you would find a quick rev with the clutch engaged, but disengaged there is a significant loss in torque and it will actually burn more fuel than a single carb. But back to my story, if we now add the exhaust component into your stock Mopar flathead (or L-head) which depending on what year engine and what vehicle, has the single exhaust exiting at one of a few different locations. For this discussion lets say it exits at the back as does the post ww2 cars. What you find is as the cylinders push out exhaust there is almost no restriction or back pressure at cylinders 5 and 6, but there is a great deal of back pressure at cylinders 1 and 2. So here we have the most back pressure making it tough to push away the exhaust and actually the front intake port receiving the least amount of fuel. While the engine meets specs with no problem, its clear that if you can balance the exhaust, by having 3 exhaust cylinders exit through 1 exhaust pipe and the other three through a 2nd pipe, you can better balance the exhaust back pressure. We sort of glossed over the fact that while there are only 3 intake ports, each cylinder does have its own exhaust port. Something that changed with the introduction of the slant 6, which had 6 equal intake runners each feeding a cylinder. Back to the flathead, if we can better distribute fuel to balance the opportunity for each of the 3 Siamese ports to get fuel, then the engine will run more efficiently. So if you were to take a big block 25 1/2" engine, and anyone of them, not just the 265 and put the factory dual carb and dual exhaust setup on it and then put on the appropriate carter ball and ball carb on it, it will gain hp, torque and improved fuel mileage. The reason is it runs more efficient. The same takes place with the 23 1/2" USA small block which has the same intake and exhaust configuration, although slightly smaller ports. If you take it one step further, putting 1 carb on top of each intake port, you can provide the optimum amount of fuel efficiency for the engine. Back to our 4 barrel friend, putting on a large carb just provides a further opportunity to over fuel the center siamese intake port. When he hammered the throttle it was actually not able to burn all of the fuel in the middle two cylinders and was “bogging” ,until it could gain enough RPM to use some of the fuel. When he was running against Mom’s pickup which had more balanced back pressure, and a better distribution of fuel he had no chance even if the engines were internally the same. Of course they weren't but that is another story. Years later when we created the AoK triple intake, we placed the first intake on an almost rock stock 201 ci motor. It had been rebuilt stock, although required to be bored out 10 thou to clean up cylinders. Beyond that it was a stock cam, intakes etc. With 3 of the smallest CFM carter ball and ball carbs on board and headers made from a stock exhaust systems, the car ran smoother, had better acceleration and got 6 miles per gallon better highway mileage over the single carb and single exhaust. In the end, it is just a myth that you need some bored out, cammed up engine for 2 carbs and a full race motor for 3 carbs. The reason why Chrysler didn't run 3 carbs was simple. 1) The cost of 3 carbs was no inconsequential 2) They could meet the HP, Torque and Fuel useage targets with 1 carb. The exception was when there was a time window where the dual carb, dual exhaust 265 ci motor was released, but with overhead valve v8s and Hemi's coming shortly after the multiple carb flathead life-cycle was short lived. There is a bit more it than that. I have glossed over a bunch of the engineering parts of why you don't just put a carb directly to each intake port with no equalization tube, but I am sure you get the drift. Unlike a v8 where you might try and make carbs progressive because your feeding a intake plenum that equally or close to equally feeding all 8 cylinders, the flathead engine has 3 intake ports each feeding 2 cylinders so progressive carbs just are not effective. On the flathead Mopar, with either 2 or 3 carbs you want them to produce the exact same fuel to feed each of the Siamese ports exactly the same. Its not progressive in terms of additional barrels or carbs, its progressive by pushing on the gas peddle. The key is making sure both or all three carbs are identical and that you have linkage that operates all of them exactly the same. Its a common misconception that they must be hard to keep synced. We have engines with tens of thousands of miles on them with multiple carbs and are never adjusted. George Asche's 1929 Desoto that he has owned since 1950 likely has an unbelievable amount of miles on it and likely the carbs were only touched when George has redone the engine. I own vehicles with 100,000 + miles on them and the linkage for the dual carbs has never touched. That has a lot to do with just how good Carter Ball and Ball carbs are.. We also get asked quite often about modifying the block to provide 6 intake ports, or using webers or other carbs, or running fuel injection. Dad and Grandfather with too much time on their hands, as my Mother would say, did modify a couple of engines to provide 6 intake ports. There were several intakes made including one with an 18" runner set on it, one with 6 side draft webers and one with modified hilborn fuel injection. At the end of the day, with various levels of success, nothing seems to outperform an Edmunds triple carb intake with riser blocks and 3 matched 1952-56 Truck carbs on them and maybe with some jetting changes. Of course, since then we have developed a couple of new cam profiles and of course the AoK triple which utilizes better and modern casting technology, as well as better flow bench testing and computer modelling that neither Chrysler or Eddy Edmunds had. Have we thought about digging out the 6 intake port block that is still in Dad's shop, well yah we have, but that is another project and a blog entry for another time.
  10. 11 points
    Good afternoon all, I have had my truck for about a year and a half and have decided to post some pictures! Started out as a barn find farm truck from Kansas that was brought to Ohio a few years back. That owner did nothing with it until I purchased it as it was when it came from Kansas. Did all of the usual work such as brake overhaul, cooling system, fuel system ETC to get her going. Been driving it consistently for about a year, and it runs and drives great! It's a 1948 B1C, 4 speed. As original as it can get. I love the original patina and it gets looks everywhere it goes. I am pretty much done with the big work, now just fine tuning some stuff. I know my user name says '49, but it was until after I discovered it was actually a '48! Feel free to ask questions and enjoy!
  11. 11 points
    February 6 1932 my good friend and second Dad, the Grand Master of Flathead Mopars - George Asche was born. Yesterday was his surprise Birthday Party and today is George's 85th Birthday! The picture below is rumored to be when George Graduated High School, but I think really that should be a diploma of future Flathead Chrysler, Desoto, Plymouth, Dodge/Fargo's mastery ! In the background is his Dad's Dodge truck which George still owns today! Happy Birthday George! Oh and if your wondering what George was up to for Birthday. Well - Lunch with his Boys at the shop (George III, Rob and Tim), then building some carbs up, then over to the machine shop for some consulting as the AoK dual carb intakes were rolling through 7 different station. The picture of George with the prototype and the very first one to be completed which of course is his birthday present.. lol A few pictures of the Dual Carb (23 1/2" USA small block) and Triple Carb (25 1/2" Canadian Big Block) intakes going through the steps, and being test fitted on blocks setup with exhausts so that every intake has been checked for a perfect fit. Then it was off for Supper in Knox (Horse Thief Capital of the World) and back to George's shop and setting up tomorrows trip, which is believe it or not, were heading down to pick up George's Uncle Harry Hiens - #90 who is in the Nascar Hall of Fame. Harry lives in Mars PA. Were bringing him up to check out the AoK intakes and take George's newest 1929 Desoto for a ride!
  12. 11 points
    ggdad1951

    New digs

    Well, after a few months of anguish and stress it should finally be happening. I've sold my house in suburbia and am moving to the "country"! The g/f and I looked online for a while and found a place that was only up for a few days, went and looked at it and immediately it would be home if we could get it. I've avoided saying much about it, but yesterday the last pieces fell into place and not much can kill the deal now. That being said some details, 9.96 acres of land, 4 acres heavily wooded, 3 acres of pasture and 3 acres of yard/buildings and grove. I close on this August 17th. House is nice and has a awesome great room and the g/f is happy as all get out about the house....but....I was a little excited about this:
  13. 11 points
    P15-D24

    Some Changes Are Coming...

    and I wanted to loop you all in. Currently the site runs forum software from Invision Power Services (IPS). Our current version is 3.4.x and it provides the functionality for most of the site including the forums, photo gallery, store, chat, blogs and downloads. I use third party products for the classified section, links and the member map. Approximately 18 months ago IPS announced a new 4.X version of their packages. This is a complete rewrite of the all the core software using more modern development tools and mythologies. Plus it provides additional functionality for tablet and smartphone users. Because it is a total rewrite the publishers of third party packages have to rewrite their packages also. Along with this announcement 18 months ago IPS informed customers 12 months after the release of 4.x they would stop all development work and bug fixes and declare the 3.4.X product as EOL (End of Life). They would continue to support the 3.4.X version for another 12 months providing only critical security patches and updates. So currently we are about 6 month out before the software becomes totally unsupported. My current plan is to do the 4.X upgrade in the late August or early September timeframe. I have already been doing testing for months to make sure the process is smooth but I can tell you it is not an easy or straightforward upgrade. I suspect it may take several days. So if it ain't broke don't fix it, right? Unfortunately the internet is not a friendly place and sites like this are constantly under attack by hackers and it is essential to maintain updated systems for site integrity. To give you a feel it is not unusually to see over 100 hack attempts per night from China, Russian and here in the USA. So the upgrade is not an option, but required. Good news is we get some upgrades too! Drag and drop picture posting, better performance, better and faster search, what is called "responsive design" which means it formats correctly for smartphones and tablets without having to use a specific app and more. In working with it on my test bed system it address many issues members have raised in the past and overall will be a positive update. Which brings me to the last issue, classified ads. First as mentioned above the classified section is provided by a third party publisher. It is nicely integrated into the site commerce system so I can easily sell classified ads. (Part of the reason it is so well integrated is it was written by an IPS programmer as his own product) The bad news is the system has still not been updated (pretty much all the other 3rd party products used have been) and he doesn't know if and when it will be ready for release. If this situation continues (and I see not reason it won't) the classified section will go away in the near future. To address this issue starting July 16, 2016 you will no longer be able to place a new classified ad. The existing ads will continue to run to their scheduled termination with the last one closing out August 13, 2016. At that point in time the classified page will no longer be available for viewing. Also on July 16, 2013 a new forum section will open for classified text ads. They are for individuals only, no images allowed, and will run for 30 days. After 30 days they will auto delete. At the same time we are introducing a new policy where commercial ads will not be allowed in the classified section. So if you run a cottage or garage business on the side, provides a service, manufacture a product for sale or have lists of products you want to sell you will need to move into a banner ad. Commercial ads will be deleted. Reposting will get you banned. Think of the classified ads as the digital equivalent for the personal ads in the back of your paper. Banner ads start at $35.00 month and I'm delivering you over 4 millions hits a month. The banners ads are a bargain and if you don't have a website with the purchase of an ad we will provide a landing page. If the third party publisher comes through at the last minute I will not start the separate forum section for classified ads, but the policy regarding commercial ads will be the guideline moving forward. Change are coming and if you have any suggestion please add them to this thread. You can see with the IPS software is all about by visiting their website. GT
  14. 11 points
    Don Coatney

    It is officially on the trailer

    My new car is due to arrive Sunday. Pretty much original with a couple exceptions. Six volt positive ground with an alternator. Pertronix ignition module, DOT 5 brake fluid, and an overdrive transmission in the trunk. Engine was rebuilt a few thousand miles ago. Minor rust in a couple of areas but overall very sound.
  15. 11 points
    Don Coatney

    Forum Member BARABBAS

    A big thanks to forum member Mike Barone (BARABBAS). He stopped by my house this morning to assist in getting my engine hot wired and running. He even brought some spare parts but thankfully they were not required. It is really great when forum members assist one another. Thanks Mike.
  16. 11 points
    I am the second owner of my truck, got it back in 1975. I drove it through college, dating and married life, the start of our family, and on the ranch till it really needed an overhaul. Unfortunately, the machine shop really screwed up the engine, then left town and screwed me, so the truck got parked in '98 with the goal of "getting to it someday." Kids finally got through school and college, so that day arrived in about 2000. I pulled it all apart, gave the engine to a competent builder, and started doing a whole lot of work myself. Found a young paint and body man that was willing to do the body work cheap, but on his schedule, so the project drug out a year or so longer than expected. However, that allowed me to get lots of good info here, and to read about everyone else's projects. As of today, the truck is back together and I put 12 miles on it...and nothing fell off (that I know of )! Still needs some tuning and more test driving, but it's alive! BTW, I had forgotten what it was like to drive a no power steering, no power brakes, no AC vehicle in 90 degree, 85% humidity.
  17. 11 points
    mrwrstory

    My Friend Mike

    A little side bar to share while waiting for the paint to cure. While working on the Burb awhile ago, young Josh showed me a school project he had just finished. The assignment was to do a diorama about a famous person. He chose Henry Ford and constructed this tribute. I think it's just spectacular! Most of the model is built from his stash of used and left over model parts. Check the overhead conveyor made from spare model truck parts and smoke stacks made from Nurf Gun bullets. -
  18. 11 points
    Some more pics.. would not have been able to complete this restoration without the help from this forum! many thanks
  19. 11 points
    STORY 1 OF 7 George from Oregon. I met George last year at the 2014 BBQ. I learned about him and his family through out the day as I made my rounds that Friday before the big day. First I saw the beautiful truck he had put together and the truck and trailer it was transported with. When I asked "Who owns the 38?" I was surprised to see a bright eyed gentlemen zip on over on his motorized wheel chair and have a nice lady say to me "He's the owner". I asked the usual questions, where did you find the truck, what motor, how long did it take to put it together...etc. He stood from the chair shaking, but walking, and shook my hand and answered my questions. It was a pleasant meeting and nice to see a guy get around so easily on my gravel roads with his powered chair and have enough strength to walk as well. . As the day wore on I realized they were leaving the truck and heading to the hotel for the night. I knew I would get a private moment with the truck which was important because I have a 38 in my fleet of unrestored trucks, and was in need of a good role model. I took pictures later and marveled at how clean it was. The next day, they showed up early and we decided to move his truck to front of the shop. I found out he had never driven the truck and may never due to his illness. It was then I started asking questions about his health. Without hesitation, the group of us said "Get in the truck George, we'll push it in place and you steer it!" The picture Dave posted of George smiling through the driver side window, was that very moment. It was a cool thing to see and experience the smile he had on his face. As I rode my ATV around helping and such, I came upon a "kid" working on his diesel truck in the parking area of the ranch. I offered him my tools and whatever help he needed from my shop to fix it. He smiled and said "that's ok, I have all the tools I need" his smile look a lot like George's...."isn't this George's tow truck?" I said, "yeah, I'm his grandson....I drove it" He went on to say he took his leave from the military so he could help get it to the BBQ. "This BBQ is on his bucket list....he really wanted to get here"......That statement put a chill up my back and about at a loss for words, "really?" I said with a hint of doubt. "Yeah....been really looking forward to it." To me its always about the people, the guys and gals getting together to have a burger and a truck to talk over.....but this was different. Or it seemed different. Or should it be different? ....I really thought hard on it and realized.....no, its not different. I was determined to give George the same experience everyone else was having......a burger and a truck to talk over. He was a dude like the rest of us and fit right in. Because of his health, and the work he did to get to the show....he earned "The Tough Trucker" award, and rightly so. That Sunday after the BBQ, they packed up the truck, said a bunch of goodbyes to the remaining crew and were on they're way. I knew they would be back next year!..... When I heard George had a stroke, seemingly right after he had just packed up for his second trip to the BBQ, I was worried. When I heard that he was not likely to make it.....I teared up. When Dave had us cheer for him over the phone at the show, I clapped and smiled. When I heard he had passed away on Sunday...I cried. He was a tough trucker, a good ol boy, he was one of us. I'm proud to have met George. 48D
  20. 10 points
    MBFowler

    Patina for sure

    I got a call about this Sunday evening from a relative of a person I worked with almost 20 yrs ago. He had remembered that I was in to old Dodges and had seen my 49 1 ton when I got it in 85. Anyway, he told me he had this 46 2 ton dump for sale that had been sitting in a barn for many years. I wasn't, but went to look at it anyway. It's now sitting in my driveway. Everything, and I mean everything on this truck works-even the fuel guage. It has new brakes all the way around, and new king pins. The interior is complete with all of the original panels in very nice shape. The sheet metal is extremely solid. The only issue I can see is a stuck intake valve that I'll be working on. I'm not going to restore this one. This will be cleaned up, preserved, and used. And she'll be going back inside.
  21. 10 points
    jpartington

    52 b-3-d starting issues

    Well it took me a while to post it but as promised here one of the pictures with us in front of the 52. Just a couple of youngsters. Kind of a shame we covered up so much of the cab lol.
  22. 10 points
    moose

    Lets see pic of your trucks

    Is it OK if I sneak this one in here? It's a pre-Mopar Dodge Brothers, and it's not a six cylinder... 27 DB
  23. 10 points
    TodFitch

    New (to me) trick

    I wanted a hose clamp for the vacuum line on my old Plymouth. And I did not want it to be a modern screw style clamp. Looking around on the web I found a commercially manufactured tool that allow you to use wire to make hose clamps. But no store near me carries those tools (or a similar competitor). While it is possible to make your own tool, I really only need to do one small hose which is already a pretty good fit so does not need a lot of clamping force. So that was more work than I wanted to do. And then I found a write up on a way to do this using stuff I already had in the garage. I thought I'd pass it on.
  24. 10 points
    TGP

    Lets see pic of your trucks

    MY 47 WDX
  25. 10 points
    1940plymouth

    Cooperstown Doctors Visit

    Yesterday Patty, Cooper and I drove up to Cooperstown for a scheduled visits with my ENT Dr that oversaw my throat cancer treatments during the summer and fall of '12, plus my Chemo Dr. After a complete inspection of my throat and neck area, my ENT Dr told me that many of the reoccurring cancers come back in the first two years, since it has been two years, three months and four days since my last radiation treatment, that I was in the clear and didn't have to see him for a year, unless I felt I should. He also gave me symptoms to look for. I thanked him and went to see my Chemo Dr. He also checked my throat and neck area, was very pleased and told me that I didn't have to see him again. He also gave me symptoms to be aware of. I thanked him, he gave me a big hug and we started the two plus hour drive home. It was as if the load of the world had been taken off my back. I immediately thanked the Good Lord and now I want to thank all you guys for the prayers and well wishes over the past couple of years, they were and are greatly appreciated Thanks so much, Bob, Patty and Cooper


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