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Showing most liked content on 01/21/2018 in all areas

  1. 4 points

    Coffee cup holders

    Made this for my '36 Plymouth.
  2. 2 points

    1 ton tires

    After watching that video I'm so tired I'm going to bed! Someone must have pushed in long studs to use those spacer plates...
  3. 2 points
    Jeff Balazs

    Scare of my life.

    Fiddy; I drive my 52 3/4 ton daily in relatively heavy and fast moving traffic here in SoCal. As you are already aware these trucks are from a completely different era of traffic and road conditions. I knew as I began my build of this truck that there were some serious upgrades required to handle the traffic conditions it now faced. Good reliable and predictable braking was at the very top of the list. Some people will tell you that the original brakes are more than adequate. I don't agree. The folks you share the road with these days have no idea and don't care if your pride and joy can stop as quickly as their new whatsit can. I get constant reminders of this almost daily. I went to the extra effort of putting 4 wheel disc brakes in my truck and I am very glad I did. I have had to use them to their full capability more than once. As a bare minimum I would suggest putting discs on the front of any of these trucks that anyone intends to use in regular traffic. It isn't that expensive or complicated. And done carefully it may just save your day...... Jeff
  4. 1 point
    Plymouthy Adams

    Scare of my life.

    here where I live they would refer to that as PECISION PARKING
  5. 1 point

    Flush convertible top cylinders

    Don't know for sure but it's probably denatured alcohol which will remove moisture from the system by absorbing it and then evaporating . Seeing that it's not a life critical system like brakes, you could probably just flush with enough ATF to effectively remove/dilute the brake fluid and moisture from the system. BTW - here is link to a film strip on servicing convertible tops from the 1950 Chrysler Master Service Technician Conference. Watched it the other day and there are some good tidbits regarding filling the system and so on: MTSC Convertible Tops
  6. 1 point

    Me and the Meadowbrook

    Show Off............lol..............have you got the tape measure out yet?..............lol......................nice mopar ........andyd
  7. 1 point
    I have a 1955 1.5 ton with a 270 poly......I'll shoot some pictures and see if it holds any info that's helpful. 48D
  8. 1 point

    First restoration project

    All it takes to ruin the hardening of steel is about 1000 degrees. You can affectively remove the hardening from a cold chisel when grinding it too long and allowing it to get too hot. But I agree, there is nothing to hurt when heating the cylinder head or or a spark plugs. If cast iron is for cooking, should we run bacon grease in the crankcase? Ha! Greg
  9. 1 point

    First restoration project

    Well how much are we calling too much? Most of the annealing processes I've seen are for stress relieving where you "cook the metal or parts " and let them cool slowly allowing the molecules to "relax". In my opinon if you heat that broken plug red and let it cool then try to remove it your not going to hurt anything. The head is cast iron. Trust me it's seen a lot of heat it it's time. They say cast iron is for cooking anyway. lol
  10. 1 point

    First restoration project

    Too much heat can aneal a heat treated steel but I doubt the cylinder head has any heat treat anyway. After all it's cast iron, is it not? Greg
  11. 1 point

    First restoration project

    If all it took for you to change the hardness is heat the company I work for wouldn't waste the time and money on quench oil and Polymer. I use heat to remove rusted and stubborn bolts on a fairly regular basis with no problems. Using the heat will cause the metal to expand and contract ( heat cycle ) breaking the bond of the rust.
  12. 1 point

    Search Help

    Ok, this may get moved or copied to the other forums, but I know people get a little lost on the search function. MAYBE this will help clear things up. So, say I want to search "tail light". FIRST I have to decide if I want to search the MAIN forum or within a SUB-forum. If you want to search them ALL, then make sure to search while on the Forum main page (where all the forums are listed). This is a MAIN forum search: but I KNOW I want something in the truck forum so I will go to THAT forum and search there: enter my search term "tail light" and hit the looking glass to search: This search returns this: You can be even more detailed in your search if you go to the "+ More Search Options" and enter information there: I this case I remembered a post by "ggdad1951" that had the info in I needed so I select "Search by author" and enter that search term: that results in a more defined search like this: Of course you can do all sorts of advanced searches with the check boxes to help you find things and you can also do a Boolean search to help refine early on in the process. Boolean searches include the "+" or "-" to either include or exclude things you are looking for. In the example below in the red box I put the "+" in front of tail light and truck. This will return ONLY search that have BOTH terms, see the yellow boxes. It will also pop up the GREEN box to further help you. More about Boolean search can be found via Google or your favorite search engine. Hopefully this helps! IF you have a suggestion to make this tutorial better, PM me. Thanks!
  13. 1 point

    Horn doesn't blow on 47 Dodge

    You have had the car since December. Has the horn ever worked? Look at this as 2 circuits. Circuit 1: Power is available at all times at the battery terminal (BAT) of the horn relay. It waits there until the horn relay is energized. Once the horn relay is energized the voltage passes on to the horn. Circuit 2: When the key is turned to the "ON" position power is then present at the IGN terminal on the relay. Pressing the horn button on the steering wheel provides a ground, and energizes the relay. (the generic diagram is labeled "S" (for switch). Your relay is labeled GND) The 6 volts that was waiting at the BAT terminal now connects up with the wire going to the horn. Things you can do in the order of your choice. 1) as suggested --a jumper wire from the battery to the horn to see if it toots. Just a touch, and pull away. If the horn does not toot, most likely a ground problem. If it toots with a jumper: 2) Check for 6 volts at the BAT terminal 3) Check for 6 volts present at IGN terminal when the key is "ON" If 6 volts is present at BAT, and IGN: 4) With the key "ON" use a jumper wire from the GND terminal to any suitable ground. (this bypasses the horn button, and the wire that runs up the center of the steering column.
  14. 1 point
    Tim Frank

    Head milling

    I agree with Nile, it is a non-linear relationship. Here is a link to check if you are interested. http://www.bgsoflex.com/cr.html