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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/30/2017 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Intake time.... Couple of dilemmas here, my 49 has a heater box hanging on the firewall and I wanted to center the 2 carbs between the 3 intake ports as best as I could. Some careful measuring here but I did make a couple of boo boo's. First, I underestimated how bulky these Weber carbs were going to be so I goofed a little on the spacing. Second I mis-measured on the back carb and got too close to the heater box. The results were choke removal on both carbs to fit. Oh well, I live in CA so it will be fine... What to use for intake runners? I didn't want to use standard bends but I wanted a gradual bend from the intake log to the port, off to Home Depot I go. I found 90 degree bends in the EMT section that will fit the bill perfectly. Now to clear the heater box, remain symmetrical and be able to center the carbs between the ports I had to lean the outer intake runners toward the middle a little Adding the horizontal part of the intake Risers for the Weber carbs
  2. 1 point
    Gregarious13

    New member with a new project

    Hi everyone, My name is Greg, I've been into all things automotive since I was 12 (I'm 32 now). I grew up and still live in the California bay area where I'm an automotive technician at a hybrid and electric car specialty shop in San Francisco. I've been a professional technician for 15 years now. I just purchased a 52 Dodge Wayfarer business coupe, a D41 I believe. I'm sure someone knows for sure. The car came with a 50 Coronet that ended up going to a friend. We're in the process of making the 50 road whorthy before I start on the 52. The Coupe doesn't have an engine or transmission and all the paint was removed by the previous owner in hopes of finishing the project. The engine and transmission are lost somewhere so I don't have them. I do have all the interior and outer trim and front end for the car, literally everything else but the engine and transmission. The plan is to buy a donor car (a 1992 to 2000 Jeep Cherokee is the plan so far) and use everything from it like engine, trans, rear end, brake master, climate control... I will keep the car looking as original as possible, inside and out, but with modern amenities and drivability. Once the 52 is under way, I'll share the progress. I'm sure I'll have questions along the way too. Thanks, Greg
  3. 1 point
    Don Coatney

    Spitfire head

    I used a dial indicator to measure valve lift with my reground cam to insure I had ample valve to head clearance with the shaved head I installed.
  4. 1 point
    Brad47

    New to Plymouth need some help

    Need to see a photo , nice rag top mark !
  5. 1 point
    I chose to finish the headers with a hand file. My OCD is showing... I didn't like the caps I welded over the removed 4th exhaust tubes so I made some covers. Warpage can be a problem so I had to bend it back a little. (pitfall)
  6. 1 point
    Jerry Roberts

    How do I remove these 2 bulbs?

    On the dome light just pull the bezel and lens away from the rest of the fixture .
  7. 1 point
    That was my original thought that might have gotten lost in the rest of the posts. First choice would be a vintage Hemi of the Chrysler, Dodge or Desoto type. Seems the Chrysler 331, 354 etc is the easiest to get parts for. I am somewhat partial to the 315/325 Dodge version and it will look retro cool under the hood! Second choice would be a 318-360 Dodge with some old school finned accessories.
  8. 1 point
    No did not think you were Mack. Just was adding comments based on tbe vehicle you mentioned in your post. Its all good and at the day of someone dropped in a ????whatever thats really their business. The Chrysler flathead 6 in healthy form and correct gearing is certainly up to the task for most modern roadways...
  9. 1 point
    Cadillac sittin' like a ton of lead, 110, a half a mile ahead..
  10. 1 point
    I didn't recommend the Iron Duke for a P15 or D24, merely commenting on the engine and my experience with it. I owned a couple of them and am well aware of their shortcomings and their strong points. Mr. Aubuchon was asking for V8 options and thread drift took over leading to discussions of V6's and 4-cylinders. So to get back on track, if I wanted to stay all Mopar I'd use a 318. If brand loyalty wasn't an issue I'd use a GM 5.3 or a 5.0 Ford. All fine motors and readily available. Ya know, now that I think about it I remember way back in the early '70s I helped a guy put a Pontiac 389 in a '55 Dodge pickup and that worked out pretty well...
  11. 1 point
    Adam H P15 D30

    Exhaust(ed)

    Yes, I installed the new exhaust and muffler when I still had the OE manifold. I just finished fabbing the new intake and exhaust so I haven't run it yet, I'll follow up in a few weeks when I get back on it. Maybe I'll do a thread with some of the build pictures?
  12. 1 point
    FlashBuddy

    Bernbaum Bowl Fuel Filter

    Pretty sure the OP is talking about this (see photo) found here http://m.oldmoparts.com/parts-fuel.aspx
  13. 1 point
    Desotodav

    Bernbaum Bowl Fuel Filter

    Are you talking about the in-line sediment filter Dennis? If so, there should be a small spring between the filter and the bottom of the glass bowl.
  14. 1 point
    55 Fargo

    IFS question

    Them Ole Fords need a Dodge spension just to get it right....lol
  15. 1 point
    Worden18

    Water distribution tube needed

    Stumbled across this: http://www.robertsmotorparts.com/store/water-distribution-tube-short-6-cyl-engine-works-with-201-218-230-1
  16. 1 point
    OT, but a truck backed into my "new" 04 car the other week and totaled it (dash cam video available upon request). Splurged and got a new car (same make, etc.) and there is a world of difference even in the last 14 years between cars. Not sure about the basic functionality, getting from place to place, etc. But the electronics are hugely different. Have to say though, that when I get in my old Plymouth everything feels familiar and functional even though the technology is from a different century.
  17. 1 point
    Don't get a speeding ticket now.
  18. 1 point
    ssnowden

    New (to me) Truck

    It's been a while since I provided an update. I had another project (48 plymouth) that I put ahead of this one, but now I'm back on the truck. The cab is in primer and I've stripped the paint off the outside doors and front fenders and front. For the most part, the cab is in great shape. The dash had some heavy pitting though. I hadn't used it before, but I shot some Slick Sand high build polyester primer hoping I wouldn't have to skim coat the whole dash. I built it up where I thought I got the thickness of most of the pits. I sanded on it for about 4 hours and I was very happy with the results. You can see from these first two photos, the pitting was bad. I have one more coat of Slick Sand to put on after I finish sanding the whole cab, and I'll use a finer grit sandpaper on the next coat to eliminate the sanding marks left with the 220, but the dash is going to go from rough as a cob, to velvety smooth. Next, as we all are prone to do, I changed my mind on the drivetrain. I've decided to put a little more power under the hood. The flathead is cool, but I didn't find myself wanting original as my end result. I want more of a resto-mod with an automatic and more power. So, I happened upon a guy locally via CL that had just pulled this 400 big block and A727 transmission from a 69 Satellite. His customer that has just bought the car decided to upgrade to a modern Hemi drivetrain from a wrecked Challenger. This 400 has about 3000 miles on a rebuild, new carb, stainless headers, a Purple Shaft camshaft and the transmission was just rebuilt too. So, I'm looking forward to having a bit more pep under the hood when it's done. Well, that's about it for this update.
  19. 1 point
    59bisquik

    IFS question

    The nice thing with kits like the Fatman is the engineering and geometry are already figured out for you. The clip can have a lot of variables depending on the installer and donor vehicle which is why I would lean towards a kit if the choice was between the two. With that being said... as for my front end, it Has been completely rebuilt along with new gas shocks and radial tires. With the 3.73 rear gears, she sees 70 mph out on the highway on a normal basis. In my experience, you don’t necessarily need to have ifs to have a comfortable and nice driving truck.
  20. 1 point
    John-T-53

    Dual exhaust set up/ route

    Countdown in.....5....4....3....
  21. 1 point
    4mula-dlx

    IFS question

    http://www.fatmanfab.com/product/mii-kits-mustang-ii-kits I wish every day I had just gone this route, but I was under a time restraint on my first go round, so I did just front disc conversion and the after a rack and pinion power steering upgrade. Fatman is about the best on the market and have a kit for your truck
  22. 1 point
    Jeff Balazs

    IFS question

    Radials and an inexpensive set of gas shocks from Napa are quite effective on these trucks. Take the time to check the kingpins and make sure to inspect and grease things up. These trucks are capable of a being very good commuters for their age. Just takes some attention to details. Jeff
  23. 1 point
    Merle Coggins

    IFS question

    Mine will do 75+ with 3.73 gears, but you'd better sort out your steering/suspension issues first.
  24. 1 point
    Jerry Roberts

    IFS question

    Do you have radial tires ? They make a big difference from the old bias ply tires on the grooved roads . Welcome to the forum .
  25. 0 points
    wayfarer

    IFS question

    IFS is a dirty word to some folks...well, ok three words.... The oem suspension was top-notch for its time but, that time was 60 years ago. As we, well some of us, get older we like an 'easier path' and driving old trucks is sometimes like herding cats when all we want is a decent ride and the ability to park the damn thing. There are plenty of various front IFS swaps on the web and the quality of the finished job is always a function of the ability of the fabricator and the fitment of the shop. And like many aspects in life, we always hear about the bad stuff before we hear about the good jobs. I am a fan of the Gen I Dakota since the frame widths are similar at the firewall, it has excellent parts supply, the bolt pattern is the same and the ride height is set at the install.


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