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  2. Almost got the car wiring completed. Thought I get the Yankee turn signal switch I went through this past summer mounted to the column and wired in. I hated to use a hose clamp, although in honesty it would probably solve much of the problem I'm having with clearance, but I will admit I'm guilty of thinking how crappy a hose clamp looks when you see it around the columkn of one of these old vintage rides....anyway - this Yankee switch came with one of the mounting ears and a piece of old rusted metal strap. The strap had rectangular slots cut about every 1/4" and you slid the ears through the correct slots and ran a bolt through the hole in both ears to tighten the strap and signal switch to the column. I made a second mtg ear (since I only received one with the switch when I found it), and since the strap was pretty much junk, I found a matching 3/4" wide piece of stainless at .025 thick, and made a mounting strap for the 1 1/2 " column. With the P15 having 3 spokes in the wheel, and in effort of being able to see the indicator light on the switch, I initially indexed the signal switch to the column where the switch was riding just above the left horizontal spoke. It seemed to look completely wrong in that position and depending on how high above the wheel spoke you positioned it, it tried to somewhat obstruct the view of the gauges...so I then relocated the switch to just below the left steering wheel spoke, trying to keep it as high as possible (just to where the indicator could be seen with the wheel in the straight forward position) and this seemed like a much better placement. Even in this lower position, this signal switch tries to take up all the real estate available on the column between the wheel and the column gear shift. (I also tried placing the switch on the dash side of the gear shift lever, and again, it didn't look right to me, also seemed like it might even get in the way of a knee mounted in this slight downward position. Finally I carefully worked it in to position as shown in the attached pictures, however placement (as it is mounted at present) has it extremely close to the shift arm (when I pull the arm up simulating a future shift into reverse),...I figured OK, this isn't horse shoes - extremely close is OK,...I won't know until the tranny is in, I'll leave it as is for the time being and if I have to clearance the strap a little later down the line, that should be do-able. While doing the above, trying to get this switch in just the right place , before I tightened her down,..I also had checked how close I was to the back of the steering wheel spokes, and I had about 1/8" clearance on one spoke, and maybe a tad less on the other,....it was at this point I thought "did I check all 3 spokes" better do that, and sure enough that far spoke on the right side only clears the turn signal switch by what looks like maybe a couple of thousands,....I mean you can't even see daylight between the back of that spoke and the front of the switch, it's not hitting but it's too close to leave and I got a feeling that once it's bolted down it sure might. Two ways I could fix this without cutting on anything. (actually three ways I suppose). 1: move the turn signal switch from where I have it , to behind the gear shift to column attachment point. 2: if I change the indexing of the switch so that it rides the column above the left horizontal spoke of the steering wheel, this will allow me to move the switch back from the steering wheel just a bit. The reason it will allow for the movement is due to the mounting ears sliding through the rectangular slots in the strap. The thickness of these ears keeps the mounting strap held out/away from the column a little over a 16th of an inch right where the mtg ear is positioned. By moving the entire switch upward on the left side, the strap moves downward on the right side, and the high part of the strap, directly above the mtg ear moves away from the back of the gear shift arm.... 3:If I placed a shim washer, bushing washer, etc...into the column to move the steering wheel out a bit,....maybe something like 40 thousands or so max,...I would obviously gain that amount of clearance between the switch and that 3rd spoke of the wheel, but I also would be removing that much of the spline to spline connection between the steering wheel and the steering column shaft.. At this point, this option 3, is my preferred choice, but I'm reminded of how often the easiest choice is many times not the correct one...IS THIS A BAD IDEA GUYS ? AND OR GALS ? Thanks for the help. Steve
  3. nonstop

    Ban, BABY IT'S COLD OUTSIDE ?

    Just read a story today, a local radio station is bringing it back! And in the SF Bay Area of all places! There still is hope!
  4. Today
  5. BobT-47P15

    My First Car -- P15 1947 Plymouth Deluxe

    To DJ194950................Yes You are correct. Sometime in the 1970s I purchased a local car, a 1955 Chrysler Saratoga New Yorker two door hardtop which had those wheels. Removed them and replaced with original style steel rims.....then re-sold the Chrysler. Would have been a nice car with quite a bit of work ..... had a hemi and a continental kit spare, was two tone green and cream. Have run those wire wheels ever since with no problems so far.
  6. billschwindt

    Merry Christmas

    Gary Those wheels are stock Dakota ,I stripped them and then powdercoated dark shiny gray.
  7. Radarsonwheels

    512 cid C series on Dakota chassis- build thread

    Jeez Plymothy I don’t look down my nose at a fuel cell equipped truck but I definitely get it. I had that spun aluminum round tank in my truck with the flathead for a while and while it worked a treat it kind of reeked of a certain kind of streetrod wannabe racer deal. I think I feel the way you do when I see a car that sits below the scrub line or that ‘cambered’ ‘stanced’ german car with stretched tire thing, or even worse a tonneau cover hiding a hideous non functional bed interior that contains ill advised suspension parts instead of hauling capacity. I do like seeing an old pickup at the track with well a well fabricated cage and four link and big slicks in the bed- but it better not run a 13.5 second 1/4 mile. In any case I do agree with you enough that I want a bed that can be used to haul a mattress or a couch or bags of mulch for the missus’ garden and not have to unload at the gas station.
  8. Wow, lots of great advice. How will I know if it is an nos seal or a newer seal? Dodge logo, part number stamped on face? Thanks
  9. I agree with everyone who has commented on your sketches 👍 i wouldn’t be too concerned leaving gaps around the mounting bolts. As long as the wood has room to move, it will crush the grain in the small area around the bolt. Keep in mind that the wood will also expand upward - very little but enough to eventually loosen the strips. If you cut a slight bevel instead of a 90 degree notch, you will get some spring action out of the metal strips. Rather than pull the bolts down tight, let the edges of the strip pull tight against the wood and leave a very slight gap in the center.
  10. NickPick'sCrew

    My First Car -- P15 1947 Plymouth Deluxe

    Thanks for all your support gents. Nicholas really appreciates the encouragement. Nicholas has decided on a color that goes perfect with his favorite suit so he's all set 😜
  11. vikingminer49er

    1953 Dodge pilot house

    B-2-B was a 1950 model. Nice truck. Already have about 50 old Dodge trucks. Don't need another right now. Good luck on your sale. Tom Anderson
  12. Dan Hiebert

    Amtrak questions

    I imagine you've already researched travel accommodations, but I'd echo that you'll get what you pay for. Our daughter and son-in-law took Amtrak from Albuquerque, NM to Portland, ME in the fall. They travelled on a package deal that got them basically a small room to themselves and meals. They loved the trip. My brother and I travelled by Amtrak from Laredo, TX to St. Louis, MO in the early '70's on cut-rate fares, just had bench seats and had to buy meals separately in the dining car, the scenery made the three day trip quite tolerable even for a couple of 12 year olds. Remember that the railroad routes were there first, you'll see scenery that you'll never see by car. Their schedules are almost always messed up due to the aforementioned railroad priorities. You do have to be careful with valuables, trains are still relatively inexpensive ways to go a long way if one isn't in a hurry, my former agency inspected the Lakeshore Limited and Empire Builder (In PA and NY) on a regular basis, there were occasionally some pretty nasty folks and conditions on the low fare cars.
  13. Dodgeb4ya

    LEAking rear end near u joint

    Modern soft thin steel and rubber coated seals remove fairly easy even by the deck screw method which I use a lot. On the factory MoPar original old seals I only use the miller or eqivalent tools as shown above... even then the seal face gets distorted
  14. Dan Hiebert

    Looking around for snow plow found this

    That would be a fine snow-plow in northern Maine, too. It's short for good maneuverability, and an airplane tug should have good weight, but it'd still need chain. I echo Uncle Pekka's sentiment, it has a construction blade on it, would need a much higher blade to work well here, typical good snow day is 12-18 inches, bad ones are 18-24. We've already got two feet on the ground this year. Uber cold and windy here, too. I don't currently have a tractor or riding plow, but I've used my neighbor's without a cab in the winter - the clothing is easy (for here), and I just wear my snowmobile helmet. Looks goofy as all get-out, but works quite well.
  15. Stock type newer seals remove well with these removal ways. But I ran into several of the original seals in the trans and rear-end that were made of armour plate steel? and multi-leveled of same. I dd drill holes all over that that dammed trans seal with ever type of pullers I could find! Maybe someone super glued them in?? Ended up with holes in that thing everywhere. I finally took chisels to the edges of the seal and got it out. When I came to the real end drive line input seal it was of the same type. Here I go again! I way able to borrow with a sizeable down payment the tool (original type) as shown above. Life was easy! Hope you find a replacement type seal on yours! Best of luck with your project! DJ
  16. johnsartain

    Ban, BABY IT'S COLD OUTSIDE ?

    What amazes me is that after 74 years, all of a sudden over the past 2 Christmas's someone has decided that they are so smart that they figured out that the song is about data rape. Everyone before them was too stupid to realize this. Hundreds of thousands, might I say millions of people have all been wrong for YEARS, thus wrongfully enjoying the song. But suddenly the offended few are the only ones woke enough to realize this and now it must be banned. Here's a hint. When everyone else is wrong, and your the only one who's right, re-evaluate your perspective.
  17. Yesterday
  18. Merle Coggins

    LEAking rear end near u joint

    I’ve pulled many a seal with sheet metal screws through the metal flange area. Some with a slide hammer tool, and some by gripping the screw with Vice Grips and prying against the pliers. Or tapping on the plier with a hammer.
  19. Plymouthy Adams

    512 cid C series on Dakota chassis- build thread

    well, that is not a real truck....a real truck would not have a fuel cell with access through the bed floor......I am pretty opinionated, and often this does not sit well with folks but I have zero respect for any fuel cell outfitted build that IS NOT 100% a track vehicle.... it reeks of pure shortcut and no matter how trick it may look, the real trick is to have a functional fuel fill that flows with the body...but remember...this is just my opinion and has nothing to do with the name on the title of your vehicle...😁
  20. Dozerman51

    LEAking rear end near u joint

    If you are going to have to replace the pinion oil seal, this is the factory tool to use to make your job a whole lot easier. You can also drill two holes on opposite sides of each other on the face of the seal. Make a pulling plate drilling one hole in the center of it and 2 holes that line up with the holes on the oil seal. Screw two long sheet metal screws through the plate and into the 2 holes on the face of the seal. Using a slide hammer with the proper adapter in the center hole of the plate pull it out. I have not tried this method, but it is said to work if you don't have the factory pulling tool. Good luck.
  21. Los_Control

    512 cid C series on Dakota chassis- build thread

    how many weeks you think that adds to the build? Not my intention, but when you get a tatoo artist and say "dont do this" I suspect radaronwheels is ready to kick us off the forums
  22. there is the process where you wet the wood with salt?water and then hook a battery charger up to it and let it burn "lighting" streaks in it. kinda cool looking, You might have to Utube it.
  23. Los_Control

    My First Car -- P15 1947 Plymouth Deluxe

    Nick, I love that you love it. Everybody here respects your opinion. I admit to being old enough to know better, but I also may just paint my truck black as it came from the factory. I get a bit of a pass, I have a truck and if it is loaded with lumber and dirty at the same time, they not going to hit me as hard as a car with dirt on it Paint it pink if you want, one poster here used the chalkboard paint so people could write on his car. I really like this idea. The most important thing here, Take your time and enjoy the process. One thing I worry about, I see it happen to others, you get to be too much of a perfectionist, is going to cost money and project is delayed and eventually abandoned. JUST GET ER DID! and then move on to the next project. ..... girls, they are often sneaky and sometimes a bigger project then first thought .... building a 32 ford coupe could be easier. Keep us posted.
  24. Don Coatney

    Looking around for snow plow found this

    Looks like my son in Buffalo has a bit of snow. They belong to my Fudd hat club so they stay warm.
  25. Dan Hiebert

    My First Car -- P15 1947 Plymouth Deluxe

    A well done black paint-job will look awesome cruising up and down Woodward during the Dream Cruise. You'll only "have to" keep it clean for that event, when you cruise your local Big Boy, or go on a date - because you'll be attracting some attention... (When we lived in Port Huron, MI, I noticed that every single Big Boy restaurant had a cruise night, coordinated so adjacent ones didn't have their cruise on the same night. You could cruise a Big Boy somewhere every night of the week. We left in 2008, I assume - rather hope - they're still doing those. Lots of fun.)
  26. Los_Control

    512 cid C series on Dakota chassis- build thread

    Probably best if you do not get ideas about tatoo'ing a tree in the wood, like this guy did
  27. vintage6t

    1951 Meadowbrook 318 conversion advise

    I know for Fords of the same vintage it is common to use an Ford Aerostar spring to lower and maintain handling. Here is one post from this site using the same application on a Mopar. Aerostar Spring
  28. Los_Control

    512 cid C series on Dakota chassis- build thread

    If only there was some sort of T molding made of rubber, you could fasten it to the sides of the wood, top would sit on the wood while sealing up against the bed sides. This would keep it looking clean on the edges.
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